How to Make Pumpkin Spice Cake Pops

Cake pops or balls are a great and unique way to indulge cakes without having to modify a recipe. Petite in size, they can be enjoyed by kids and adults for any occasion. Enjoy these for Halloween or Thanksgiving.
Makes 48 cake balls.

[Edit]Ingredients
[Edit]Cake Pops
Your favorite yellow cake recipe
1 (15 ounce) can pumpkin puree
2/3 cup light brown sugar, packed
2 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 to 1/2 cup cream cheese icing[Edit]Coating and Decoration
24 ounces white chocolate melts
Cinnamon sugar mixture[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Creating the Cake Mixture
Bake the cake. Follow the specific recipe you are using, in addition to adding the cinnamon, pumpkin puree and spice, and brown sugar. Be sure to follow the regular ingredient amounts, utensils and baking dishes, steps or instructions, oven temperatures, and baking times as well.
Slice the cake. Using a damp knife, cut the cake in sections or quarters. This allows the insides of the cake to cool down faster, rather than having the cake cool down from the outside in.
Crumble the cake. When the cake pieces has reached room temperature or warm to handle, use your hands to crumble the cake in a large mixing bowl. You will want to break down any chunks, especially any hard corners.
Add the icing. Start off with 1/4 cup of icing in the bowl. Use a wooden spoon to thoroughly incorporate the cake crumbs and icing together until you achieve a consistency of dough, as if you’re making cookie dough. Add additional icing, if needed.
Refrigerate the mixture. Having the mixture chilled makes it easier for you to roll it into balls.[Edit]Making the Cake Balls
Scoop the mixture. Use a cookie dough scooper to help you make even ball amounts, about 1 tablespoon (15 grams). To avoid multitasking, scoop the entire mixture and place the balls onto a flat surface (such as a baking sheet or counter top), lined with parchment paper.
Roll the cake balls. Use both palms of your hands and circle each ball in a circular motion, to allow any flat surfaces become evenly round.
Chill the cake balls. For the best results, it’s recommended to refrigerate the cake balls for at least two hours. By doing this, any coating won’t affect the prepared cake when dipping.[Edit]Dipping the Cake Balls
Melt the chocolate. You can either use a microwave-safe bowl or create a double boiler. Stir the chocolate to make sure everything is melted evenly.
Insert sticks into the cake balls. Prick them in the center, just enough to pick them up from the parchment paper and hold.
If you’re wanting to present the cake balls on a stick, it’s recommended to use lollipop sticks, which can be found in specialty baking aisles. Dip about 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) of the stick into the melted chocolate prior to inserting them into the cake balls.
If you’re wanting to present the cake balls in decorative individual wrappers, poke them with toothpicks.
Dip the cake balls. While holding the lollipop stick or toothpick, submerge the cake ball into the melted chocolate. When lifting it back up, gently lift them in a swirling motion or give them a gentle shake.
If you are using toothpicks, remove them from the balls. Add a very small amount of extra melted chocolate to cover the holes. You can use the back of a spoon to evenly spread out any extra coating as well.
Repeat with the rest. Place the chocolate covered cake ball in the same place on the waxed paper. Pick up the next one and repeat the dipping until everything is covered.[Edit]Decorating the Cake Balls
Drizzle additional melted chocolate on top. You can create even zig-zag lines by moving your arm back and forth in a uniform way across the entire sheet of cake balls.
Use the cinnamon sugar mixture on the cake balls. You can either sprinkle by hand or dip it in the mixture while the chocolate is still in a liquid state, if you’re not drizzling chocolate on top.
Chill the cake balls again. To ensure a hard coating and for any topping to appear more uniform, place the cake balls in the freezer or refrigerator for about an hour or two.
Finished.[Edit]Tips
These can also be created into small bars. Instead of rolling them into round balls, mold them into squares before any dipping.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Cookie scoop
Mini cupcake liners
Large bowl
Baking sheet
Parchment paper
Wooden spoon
Lollipop sticks or toothpicks
[Edit]Related wikiHows
Make Cinnamon and Walnut Pumpkin Cake
Make a Pumpkin Spice Cheesecake
Make Armenian Nutmeg Cake[Edit]References
Ankeny, Robin. Cake Balls: Amazingly Delicious Bite-Sized Treats. Philadelphia: Running Press, 2012. Print.
Read More

Today in History for 7th October 2019

Historical Events

1882 – 1st World Series (game 2), Chicago (NL) beats Cincinnati (AA) 2-0
1916 – The German submarine U-53 arrives off Newport, Rhode Island, and sinks 9 British merchant ships in international waters
1926 – Italian Great Fascist Council forms
1935 – Detroit Tigers beat Chicago Cubs, 4 games to 2 in 32nd World Series
1935 – Himmler, Hess and Heydrich inspect the concentration camp at Dachau
2014 – Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura win the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics for inventing blue light emitting diodes

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1917 – June Allyson, actress (Till the Clouds Roll By, Vegas), born in The Bronx, New York
1926 – Marcello Abbado, composer
1934 – Willie Naulls, NBA star (NY Knicks)
1953 – Christopher Norris, American actress (Summer of ’42, Eat My Dust), born in NYC, New York
1960 – Kyosuke Himuro, Japanese singer
1977 – Meighan Desmond, New Zealand actress

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1620 – Stanisław Żółkiewski, Polish military leader (b. 1547)
1944 – Helmut Lent, German night-fighter ace in World War II, dies at 26
1991 – Leo Durocher, baseball player and manager (Dodgers, Giants), dies at 86
1995 – Gérard de Vaucouleurs, French astronomer, dies at 77
2009 – Shelby Singleton, American record label owner and producer (Smash Records, Mercury Records), dies of brain cancer at 77
2012 – John Tchicai, Danish jazz saxophonist and composer, dies at 76

More Famous Deaths »

Read More

How to Play Dominoes

Dominoes is a classic game that has been around for a long time, and it’s not too hard to learn how to play! Two of the most popular dominoes games are “Straight Dominoes” and “Mexican Train Dominoes,” and all you need is a set of tiles and a few friends to play with. Have fun competing against your friends hand after hand until someone emerges as the ultimate champion.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Playing Straight Dominoes
Play the game with 2 to 4 players. If there are 4 players, you could choose to play as partners with the person sitting opposite you, or you can each play your own hands. If you want to play with more than 4 people, use a double-12 set instead of a double-9 set.[1]
A double-12 set comes with 91 tiles, and a double-9 set comes with 55 tiles.
Shuffle the dominoes face down and draw to see who plays first. Lay all the tiles face down on a flat surface in front of you. Have one player mix up the tiles so that they are thoroughly shuffled. Let each person draw one tile—the person with the highest double will go first. If a double wasn’t drawn, the person with the heaviest tile (the tile with the most pips) will go first. Put the tiles back into the pile and give them another quick shuffle.[2]
Every dot on a tile is an individual “pip.”
Because each game of dominoes involves playing several hands, trade off who shuffles at the beginning of each hand so everyone gets a turn.
Have each player draw 7 dominoes for their hand. You can pick from anywhere in the pile, but after a tile has been picked, it can’t be put back into the pile. Set your 7 dominoes up in front of you so that you can see them, but try to keep them hidden from your neighbors.[3]
Play on a hard surface if you can, as that will make it easier to stand the dominoes on edge in front of you.
Place the first tile in the center of the table to begin the round. The person who drew the tile to go first can put down whatever tile they want to get the game started. If this is you, it’s generally a good idea to lay down a tile that you know you’d be able to build off of in your next turn.[4]
For example, if you lay down a tile with 3 pips on one side and 1 pip on the other but don’t have any other tiles with 3 or 1 pips on a side, you wouldn’t be able to take a turn unless someone else lays down a tile you can match.
Take turns building off the tiles on the board with the tiles in your hand. Go counter-clockwise around the table. Each turn consists of a player laying down one tile. That tile has to have a side that matches the open end of a domino that is already on the table. Continue taking turns until someone uses up all of their tiles.[5]
If you lay down a tile with a blank side, it can only be matched with another tile that also has a blank side. In some games, people choose to make the blanks “wild,” meaning you can ascribe any value to it. You can choose whichever option you like best!
Pick up a tile from the draw pile if you can’t play a tile in your hand. If the tile you pick up from the draw pile matches something on the board, you can play it. If not, add the tile to your hand. The turn then passes to the next person.[6]
In this way, you can end up with way more than 7 tiles in your hand during any given game.
Win the round by using all of the dominoes in your hand. Whoever is the first person to lay down all the tiles from their hand onto the table is the winner of that round. There will be at least 7 turns per round, but if everyone ends up having to pick up extra tiles from the draw pile, the game could last much longer than that.[7]
Though you may have won the round, that doesn’t mean you’ve won the game! You’ll have several hands to play before the entire game is finished.
Tally the score by adding up the points left in each player’s hand. Have each player add up the total number of pips on the tiles they have left in front of them. On a piece of paper, add those numbers to the column of the person who won that hand. The first person to get to 100 points wins the game.[8]
Because you have to get to 100 points before the game ends, there are multiple chances for every player to win rounds and ultimately come out victorious at the end![Edit]Competing at Mexican Train Dominoes
Pull out the double-12 or double-9 domino from the set. Choose a domino set with a double-12 for a 13-hand game; choose the double-9 set for a 10-hand game. From whichever set you choose, remove the highest double-sided tile before you move on to shuffling.[9]
In Mexican Train, the game starts with the highest double-sided tile in the middle of the table. Each hand after that starts with the double-sided tile that is one number less than the one preceding it: the first hand starts with the double-12, the second hand starts with the double-11, the third hand starts with the double-10, and so on.
Shuffle the remaining dominoes facedown on the table in front of you. Lay out all of the tiles and flip them so they are pip-side down. Thoroughly mix them up by hand.[10]
Because there are so many rounds played in Mexican Train, have players take turns flipping and shuffling the tiles.
Have each player draw their cards from the shuffled tiles. After you draw your tiles, set them up in front of you on their sides so you can see what you have, but try your best to keep them hidden from your neighbors. You can play Mexican train with up to 8 people if you have a double-12 set. If you have a double-9 set, you can play with only 2 to 4 people. Follow this breakdown to determine how many tiles each person should take:[11]
Double-12: 2 to 3 players take 16 tiles each; 4 players take 15 tiles each; 5 players take 14 tiles each; 6 players take 12 tiles each; 7 players take 10 tiles each; 8 players take 9 tiles each.
Double-9: 2 players take 15 tiles each; 3 players take 13 tiles each; 4 players take 10 tiles each.
Put the remaining tiles into the “train yard” to draw from on future turns. If on any given turn you don’t have a domino in your hand that can be played on either the Mexican train or your personal train, draw one tile from the train yard. If that tile can be played, play it. If not, it gets added to your hand and the turn passes on to the next player.[12]
The “train yard” is also sometimes called the “bone pile.”
Keep the tiles in the train yard face down.
Set the double domino in the center of the table to begin play. After drawing tiles for your hand and creating the train yard, it’s finally time for gameplay to begin! There are sets you can buy that include a little stand for the starter tile, which you’re welcome to use if you have it. If not, simply place the double-12 or double-9 tile into the center of the playing space.[13]
This starter tile is often referred to as the “engine tile.”
Everyone can play off of the engine tile, though each person’s personal train coming off of that engine tile isn’t fair game to other players unless there is a marker on it, which appears when a player isn’t able to take their turn.
Pick someone to start and take turns clockwise around the table. Whoever goes first can lay down a tile only if they have one that matches the denomination of the engine tile. For example, if the engine tile is a double-12, then you must lay down a tile that has 12 pips on one side or the other. The 12-pip side needs to be laid down so it is connected to the double-12 engine tile.[14]
The exception to the 1-tile per turn rule is if you lay down a double tile, meaning that the pips on each side of the tile are the same. If you lay down a double tile, take a second turn immediately and lay down an additional tile.
Win a hand by being the first to lay down all of your dominoes. Once a player has laid down all the tiles in their hand, that particular round is over. Keep score on a piece of paper; have each player with tiles left in their hand add up the total number of pips. Add this figure beneath their name on the scoresheet. The goal is to have the lowest number at the end of all the rounds.[15]
A set of double-12 dominoes will have 13 rounds, and a set of double-9 dominoes will have 10 rounds.
The only other way a round can end is if the entire train yard has been depleted and no one can make a move. In that case, everyone tallies up the pips left in their hand and those figures get added to the score sheet.
Continue playing and keeping score until all the double tiles are used. Each new round is started with the engine tile that is one number lower than the one used in the previous hand (double-9 for the first hand, double-8 for the second hand, double-7 for the third, and so on). The blank double is the last engine you will use before the end of the game (blank tiles can only be matched with tiles that also have a blank side).[16]
The already-used double tiles just get mixed back in with the other tiles when you shuffle between rounds.[Edit]Printable Dominoes
WH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5d9aaa311cc19’)Printable Dominoes
[Edit]Tips
Each dominoes game can have lots of variations depending on how you learned to play and who you’re playing with, and that is okay! Just take a few moments to talk with your friends and make sure everyone agrees on the rules before you start playing.
Try playing dominoes online! It’s a great way to play the game without having to actually own a set of dominoes.
There are many other games that can be played with dominoes, like Moon and Texas Two Step.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Play Backgammon
Play Go
Play Heroscape
Play Hex
Play Squabble
Win at Battleship
Play Moon (Domino Game)[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.dominorules.com/straight-dominoes

↑ https://www.dominorules.com/straight-dominoes

↑ https://www.dominorules.com/straight-dominoes

↑ https://www.dominorules.com/straight-dominoes

↑ https://www.dominorules.com/straight-dominoes

↑ https://www.dominorules.com/straight-dominoes

↑ https://youtu.be/9MeWPTqJsns?t=141

↑ https://youtu.be/9MeWPTqJsns?t=152

↑ https://youtu.be/0Ty6HHUxqKc?t=63

↑ https://www.mexicantrainrulesandstrategies.com

↑ https://www.mexicantrainrulesandstrategies.com

↑ https://www.mexicantrainrulesandstrategies.com

↑ https://www.mexicantrainrulesandstrategies.com

↑ https://www.mexicantrainrulesandstrategies.com

↑ https://www.mexicantrainrulesandstrategies.com

↑ https://youtu.be/0Ty6HHUxqKc?t=204

Read More