How to Improve Your Mental and Emotional Health

Your mental health and emotional well-being are important aspects of your overall health. In fact, they are just as important as your physical health. Your mental health can be affected by medical conditions such as depression. Environmental factors, such as your job, also make an impact. Your emotional health can be related to your social life, your romantic life, and your own mindset. No matter what your situation is, you can take steps to improve your mental and emotional health. First, make it a priority. Once you evaluate your needs, you can begin finding ways to meet them. You can also ask family and friends to help you on your way towards improved mental health.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Making Your Mental Health a Priority
Take a self-assessment. In addition to traditional intelligence, everyone has what is known as “emotional intelligence” or EQ. EQ refers to how well you understand your emotions and actions. Figuring out your EQ is a great place to start if you are looking to improve your mental and emotional well being.[1]
You can find online assessment tools to help you figure out your results.
A mental health specialist can also help you determine your EQ. This will help you figure out which areas need the most improvement.
For example, maybe you’ll learn that you are not great at acknowledging your emotions. That could give you a starting point for improvement.
List your priorities. Take some time to look at the big picture. Are there areas of your life where you know you could make improvements? Devote some of your attention to figuring out which of these areas is most important to you.[2]
One of your priorities might be developing a more positive relationship with your sister.
Another priority might be figuring out how to maintain a healthy work-life balance, good physical health, fulfilling relationships, and a satisfying spiritual life.[3] Figuring out what you most want to improve can help you figure out the most productive path.
Set goals. After you have completed your self-assessment, you can clearly identify the areas you would like to focus on improving. Take time to set some clear, attainable goals. These can be both long term and short term goals.[4]
For example, maybe you will set a goal of meditating for 10 minutes every day. That is a short term goal.
You might say, “I would like to feel more confident in my conflict resolution strategies by the end of the year.” That’s more of a long term goal.
Write down your goals. This will help you solidify them and make you more likely to commit.
Process your emotions. An important part of improving your emotional well-being is learning to acknowledge your emotions. Sometimes it might feel simpler to shove aside an uncomfortable emotion. However, it is important to process your emotions. Processing your emotions is a multi-step process. This process includes:[5]
Sensing. This is when you notice the way you are feeling. There might be a physical sensation associated with this emotion. For example, you might feel sad and notice a feeling of heaviness or tightness in your chest.
Naming. This is when you apply a name to the emotion. For example, you might decide that what you are feeling is sadness.
Attributing. This is when you try to find the source of the emotion that you are having. For example, you might attribute a feeling of sadness to a bad day at work or a falling out with a friend.
Evaluating. This is when you think about how having the emotion makes you feel. For example, you might note that you feel angry for feeling sad or uncomfortable for feeling sad. This may be a result of your background or culture.
Acting. This is when you decide what you are going to do to express or cope with the emotion. For example, if you are feeling sad, then you might decide to write about it, go for a walk, call someone, or just sit and do nothing for a while.
Learn how to identify and deal with your triggers. Everyone has different triggers. Yours might be certain people, situations, or places.[6] To cope with your triggers, take some time to figure out what they are and develop plans for how to deal with them.
For example, you might note that you get anxious whenever you are around your sister, so she might be a trigger for you. Therefore, you might develop a plan to cope when you are around her, such as keeping to light topics of conversation, setting a time limit for your visits, or bringing a friend along to act as a source of support.
Gather information. Avoid the stigma that mental health issues are somehow not “real” problems. Your mental and emotional health is just as important as your physical health. Take some time to learn about the importance of your mental health.[7]
Head to the library. Look for some books about the value of taking good care of your mental health.
Research different ways to improve your emotional well being. For example, you might visit a yoga studio to ask them about the mental benefits of practicing yoga.[Edit]Choosing Healthy Activities
Have fun. Good news! Experts say that playing might actually be good for you. A great way to boost your mood is to make time to do something fun.Think of some new ways to enjoy yourself.[8]
Organize a game night. Invite your friends over for board games or cards.
Head to the park. Swinging is just as much fun for adults as it is for kids.
Make more jokes. Try something as simple as saying, “Lovely weather, isn’t it?” while you’re waiting for the bus in a downpour. It may not be original, but the act of making a joke can improve your mood.
Be creative. Try to get in touch with your artistic side. Creative activities can be very therapeutic, and can also serve as mood boosters. Consider sketching as a relaxing activity.[9]
Take an art class. Contact your local community center for details. This would also be a great way to make new friends.
Get a coloring book. Kids aren’t the only ones who enjoy coloring. Adult coloring books can help you relax and unwind.
Listen to music. Or, learn to play an instrument. You could find a group class or hire an individual teacher.
Volunteer. Giving back to others is a great way to make yourself feel good. Volunteering can boost your mood and improve your emotional health. Plus, it’s important to help others. It’s a win-win.[10]
Choose something that interests you. For example, if you love animals, consider volunteering at your local animal shelter.
Volunteering can also serve as a way to meet new people. You might even make some new friends!
Spend time outside. Nature is a natural mood enhancer. Being outdoors can help you slow down and relax, which is great for your mental health. Make it a point to head outdoors frequently.[11]
Take a break from work. Instead of eating at your desk, walk to a nearby park to eat lunch on nice days.
Go exploring. Check out nearby state parks and head out for a hike.
Ask a friend to join you on a bike ride.
Learn to meditate. Meditation is a great way to reduce stress and tension. Commit to adding meditation to your routine. If you’re not ready to try it daily, begin by adding two to three brief sessions per week. They can be short–even a 5-minute meditation is helpful.[12]
Download an app that has guided meditations. You can choose the length you want.
Morning and night are both great times to meditate. Just make sure to choose a quiet spot and wear comfortable clothing.
Try to clear your mind. Choose a mantra to repeat, such as “Om”.[Edit]Practicing Physical Self-Care
Manage your stress. The mind-body connection is critical for maintaining good health. If you don’t physically feel good, odds are good that your mental and emotional health will suffer, too. Take care to keep your body in good health. One of the most important things you can do is to learn to control your stress. [13]
Take a time-out. For example, if you are having an argument with your partner, say, “I’m going to take a walk around the block to cool down before we continue this discussion.”
Find coping mechanisms. Everyone experiences stress. The key is to be able to handle it.
Try different techniques such as slowly counting to 10 when you feel stressed. You could also try listening to music or taking a relaxing bath.
Focus on your breath. Breathe slowly and intentionally, in through your nose and out through your mouth. This will help slow a racing heart rate often caused by stress.
Exercise. Physical activity produces endorphins, which boost your mood. Regular exercise can help you to manage stress, feel more confident, and improve your overall health. Try to get at least 30 minutes of exercise most days of the week.[14]
Find an activity you enjoy. You’ll be more likely to stick to the program.
Do you like to dance? Try a Zumba class.
Socialize during your workouts. Ask a friend to go for a long walk while you catch up on gossip.
Eat a healthy diet. Food can definitely impact your mood and your overall mental health. Take care to stick to a healthy diet. Make sure that you eat plenty of fruits and veggies each day. Combine these with lean proteins and complex carbs.[15]
Certain foods are mood boosters. Try adding salmon, walnuts, and avocados to your diet.
You should also look for blueberries and leafy greens, such as kale.
Avoid foods that can negatively impact your mood. Try to stay away from sugary snacks and fried food.
It’s also a good idea to limit your alcohol and caffeine intake.
Get enough sleep. You won’t feel well if you don’t get enough rest. Make getting a good night’s sleep a priority. Most adults need between seven and nine hours per night.[16]
Try to go to bed and get up at the same time each day. This will help your body adjust to a regular sleep schedule.
Limit electronics before bed. Power down the laptop and the television about an hour before bedtime. Avoid checking e-mail or social media late at night.
Lack of sleep can make you irritable, anxious, and unable to focus.[Edit]Connecting With Others
Be social. Socialization is an important part of feeling your best. Being social doesn’t mean that you have to go out every night. It just means that you should make an effort to regularly interact with people. [17]
Say hi to your neighbors. Striking up a pleasant conversation can increase feelings of happiness.
Meet new people. Try joining a local book club if you love to read.
Make plans. Put some effort into building your network of friends. If you enjoy chatting with someone in yoga class, ask if they want to grab a smoothie after class sometime.
Get a pet. Animals are a wonderful source of companionship. They can also be entertaining and funny. Best of all, pets are a great source of unconditional love.[18]
Choose the pet that is right for your lifestyle. For example, if you love to hike, pick a dog that can go with you.
Taking care of a cat can make you feel needed, which is important for good mental health.
Talk to friends and family. Make sure to connect with the people in your life who are important to you. Your loved ones can support you when you’re down, and celebrate with you when something good happens. Make it a point to spend time with the people in your personal network.[19]
Reach out to someone you haven’t seen in a while. Pick up the phone and say, “Hi, it’s been a while. Let’s get together and catch up!”
Lean on loved ones when you need to. Don’t be afraid to say, “Bill, I’ve been feeling low lately. Do you have some time this week to get together and talk?”
Seek professional help. Sometimes you might feel like nothing you try is working. If you think you might have a mental health condition, consider seeing a medical professional. For example, if you have been depressed, look for a counselor.[20]
Therapy can be really helpful if you are dealing with issues such as anxiety or depression. Ask your doctor for a recommendation.
You can also visit your primary care physician. Ask if there could be a physical reason behind your emotional issues.[Edit]Tips
Be patient with yourself. Improving any aspect of your health can take time.
Don’t forget to laugh–it’s good for you!
Be willing to talk about your feelings.
Make time to take care of yourself.
Celebrate Mental Health Day to spread awareness about mental health issues.[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.sdcity.edu/portals/0/cms_editors/mesa/pdfs/emotionalintelligence.pdf

↑ https://www.qld.gov.au/health/mental-health/balance/lifestyle/

↑ https://www.nwmissouri.edu/wellness/PDF/shift/BalancingYourWellness.pdf

↑ https://www.uhs.umich.edu/tenthings

↑ http://www.willmeekphd.com/processing-emotions/

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/emotional-health/improving-emotional-health.htm

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/emotional-health/improving-emotional-health.htm

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/emotional-health/benefits-of-play-for-adults.htm

↑ https://www.nyu.edu/content/dam/nyu/studentHealthServices/documents/PDFs/mental-health/CWS_SOS_for_Emotions_Booklet.pdf

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/work-career/volunteering-and-its-surprising-benefits.htm

↑ http://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/enhance-your-wellbeing/environment/nature-and-us/how-does-nature-impact-our-wellbeing

↑ http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2015/02/09/7-ways-meditation-can-actually-change-the-brain/#2f75d02b7023

↑ https://www.nyu.edu/content/dam/nyu/studentHealthServices/documents/PDFs/mental-health/CWS_SOS_for_Emotions_Booklet.pdf

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/emotional-health/improving-emotional-health.htm

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/emotional-health/improving-emotional-health.htm

↑ http://www.cdc.gov/features/getting-enough-sleep/

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/emotional-health/improving-emotional-health.htm

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/emotional-health/improving-emotional-health.htm

↑ http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/emotional-support.aspx

↑ http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/emotional-support.aspx

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Today in History for 10th October 2019

Historical Events

1937 – NY Yankees beat Giants 4 games to 1 in 34th World Series
1957 – US President Eisenhower apologizes to the finance minister of Ghana, Komla Agbeli Gbdemah, after he is refused service in a restaurant in Dover, Delaware
1960 – “Laughs and Other Events” opens at Barrymore Theater NYC for 8 performances
1971 – Rain washes out Game 2, 1st World Series postponement since 1962
1980 – 4,500 die when a pair of earthquakes strikes NW Algeria
1987 – Garfield Park Nature Center opens, latest in Cleveland Metroparks

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1684 – Jean-Antoine Watteau, French Rococo painter (fêtes galantes), born in Valenciennes, France (d. 1721)
1713 – Johann Ludwig Krebs, German musician and composer, born in Buttelstedt, Germany (d. 1780)
1829 – Dandridge McRae, American Brigadier General (Confederate Army), born in Baldwin County, Alabama (d. 1899)
1925 – Ivan Sviták, Czech philosopher and poet, born in Hranice na Moravě, Czechoslovakia (d. 1994)
1946 – John Prine, American country singer (Hello in There), born in Maywood, Illinois
1970 – Matthew Pinsent, English rower (4 Olympic gold medals), born in Holt, Norfolk, England

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1708 – David Gregory, Scottish astronomer (b. 1659)
1745 – Jacobus Nozeman, Dutch composer and organist, dies at 52
1975 – Lillian Walker, American silent era actress, dies at 88
1978 – Ralph Marterie, American big band leader (b. 1914)
2001 – Eddie Futch, American boxing trainer, dies at 90
2009 – Stephen Gately, Irish singer (Boyzone) (b. 1976)

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Find the Value of Old Books

That old book in your attic may not be worth much to you, but it might be worth a lot to a potential buyer. For instance, a rare first edition of Charles Darwin’s “On the Origin of Species” was auctioned off for $150,000 in 2011.[1] Even if you don’t have this kind of treasure on your hands, once you’ve identified your copy’s edition and publication details, you can assess its market value. Start by examining the book and referencing online resources. If you’d like additional input, enlist the help of an appraiser. Remember that your book’s monetary value depends on the market and what a buyer is willing to pay.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Identifying Your Book
Refer to the book’s title page and copyright page for key information. Make note of the full title of the publication and the author’s name. Then look for the imprint details, namely the publisher’s name and the city and date of publication, as well the copyright registration date.[2]
Gently open the book to the first page. Pass any blank pages and the half-title page, if there is one, which contains only the name of the book. Following these, you will find the title page. Turn to the reverse or the following page for the copyright page.
Don’t rely on the dust jacket or binding to find the information you need, since these elements may not be original to the pages within. Even if they are, the information they provide may be incomplete.
Determine the edition details of your copy. Many book collectors prize first editions and other rare editions. Check the title page and copyright page to see if your book is a first edition, a revised edition, or a limited edition. These details, which may impact the value of your copy, are usually printed along with the other key identifying information.[3]
Some first editions display the words “First Edition” on the title page, but many don’t. You may have a first edition book if you only see a single publication date.
You can identify a reprint if you see multiple publication dates listed. Reprints often include the word “Printing” (as in “Second Printing”) or “Edition” (with an ordinal number other than “First”).
In some cases, a book may be reprinted by a publisher other than the publisher who originally published it. It may be described as “First (publisher name) Edition” to indicate that the press is not the original publisher of the work.
Match your book’s details with a record in an online catalog. Armed with your list of key identifying information, compare what you know about your copy with the official publication history of the book. Visit an online catalog such as World Cat, the National Union Catalog (NUC), or a print or digital author/subject bibliography that has been published about your book’s author or topic. Search by the author, title, and imprint details until you find a record that precisely matches your copy.[4]
These catalogs include a different entry for each known and suspected edition of a book title.
You’ll be able to see where your edition fits within the title’s overall publication history. This will help you understand how old it truly is.
Use this catalog information to determine how rare your copy is. While determining the number of private owners is difficult at best, you can look up how many copies are held in public, corporate, and collegiate libraries. Search your copy in World Cat, NUC, or another online reference and you’ll be able to see how many copies of that edition are accessible and where they’re held.
As with most collectible items, the fewer copies that exist, the more valuable each individual remaining copy is.
Ask a librarian to help you look up your book in an online catalog if you’re having trouble.[5][Edit]Assessing the Quality of Your Copy
Confirm the completeness and condition of the book’s pages and plates. Look to the catalog record that matches your book to see how many pages and illustrations (often called plates) it should contain. Gently examine your own book to see whether it contains all of the pages and plates it originally contained. Look carefully at your book to see whether the pages are stained, discolored, creased, or torn and how any edge treatment like gilding has held up.
Refer to antiquarian terminology to accurately define the damage. For example, brown splotches are known as “foxing.”[6]
Condition and completeness both impact the monetary value of an old book.
Note any damage to the book’s binding. Determine how secure the binding is and whether or not the front and back boards of the cover are firmly attached to the spine. Look carefully at the condition of the binding stitches and glue.[7]
A book without its original binding is also incomplete.
If your book isn’t terribly rare, a copy in worse condition will always be of less value than a similar copy in a better condition.
Examine the physical condition of the cover and dust jacket, if applicable. Check to see if the outer cover and spine are faded, ripped, or warped in any way.[8] If you have a 20th-century book, check to see if it still has its original dust jacket. Assess the condition of the dust jacket and note any tears, creases, or discoloration.[9]
The absence of a dust jacket from a book that originally came with one may significantly decrease its value.
Summarize the book’s overall physical condition in antiquarian grading terms. Refer to antiquarian guides to confidently define your copy’s condition. Commonly-used terms include “fine” or “like new,” meaning the book is in near-perfect condition with no visible defects. Terms including “very good,” “good,” “fair,” and “poor” indicate increasing levels of defectiveness. Note the details about your book’s physical condition as it relates to the grade you’ve assigned it.[10]
Regardless of condition, refer to your book as an “ex-library copy” if it contains library markings or originated at a library.
Use “binding copy” to refer to a book whose pages are in decent condition but which requires a new binding.[11]
Keep in mind that especially old or rare books may still be highly valuable even with considerable damage.
Gather evidence of your book’s provenance to increase its value. Your book’s provenance, or the history of who owned it in the past, can have an impact on its value, particularly if it belonged to a notable owner. Check for a bookplate with the owner’s name, a handwritten signature, or an author’s autograph mentioning the owner’s name.[12]
If your book came with a compelling story, try to track down documentation proving this lineage to be true. Look into family records or consult people who knew the previous owner for confirmation.[Edit]Determining Your Book’s Market Value
Have your book formally appraised by a qualified expert. If you desire tax incentives or insurance coverage for your book, you’ll need to get a formal appraisal. Appraisals can be done by a certified book appraiser or informally by a dealer in second-hand or rare books. America (ABAA), the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB), or the International Society of Appraisers (ISA).[13] Track down an appraiser in your area so that they can examine the physical book.
Appraisals typically cost a fee, often to cover services as well as insurance, so be prepared for this investment.
If you’re not able to find an appraiser in your area, send detailed photographs of the book. Snap pictures of the front and back of the title page, the first and last text pages, the outer covers, and the spine, as well as any other aspects the appraiser asks for.
Librarians typically don’t provide appraisal services.
If your book contains a signature, an appraiser will be able to authenticate it for you. Depending on the book and signature, the presence of a signature may significantly increase the value of your book.
Consult a recently-printed reference guide for your book’s estimated value. A number of printed references to collectible books exist. Find one related to your book’s subject or author at a library or within the collectibles section of a bookstore. Depending on how the reference guide is organized, your book may be listed by alphabetically by author or title, or chronologically by publication date. Refer to the guide’s table of contents and index to locate the listing you need.
Be sure to refer to the most recent version when possible, as book values fluctuate.
Refer to Allen and Patricia Ahern’s “Collected Books: The Guide to Values” for details on first editions.
Look to ”American Book-Prices Current” and “Book-Auction Records,” 2 reference guides for prices old books fetched at auction. The semiannual “Bookman’s Price Index” summarizes the information from book dealers’ catalogs to produce its list of prices.[14]
Search online book resellers to see what your book could sell for. Search your book’s details on the websites of booksellers, such as Abe Books, BookFinder, and AdALL, and auction sites like eBay to see what others are currently charging or paying for copies like yours.[15]
If you don’t see many results for your exact copy, this may either be due to its limited popularity or its scarcity. Consider consulting an antiquarian if you can’t find much online.
Set up an account and try to sell or auction off your book through one of these sites if you’d like.[16]
Remember that the book’s monetary value equals what a buyer is willing to pay. Despite what a catalog, online reference, or appraiser may tell you, the actual amount you’ll get for selling an old book depends on what your buyer is willing to pay for it. Consider these estimates as educated guesses, not determinations. Know that many factors will impact the amount of cash you’ll be able to get for your copy.
Buyer demand may fluctuate according to trends in the market or fluctuations in personal interests.
A famous title, the work of a well-known author, or a book about a popular subject may be more valuable due to popularity or less valuable due to oversaturation in the market.
Hold onto your book if you’re not comfortable selling it. You only have one chance to cash in on the market value of your book. If you feel as though your book is worth more than what others are willing to pay for it at any given moment, just hang onto it. After a few years, the value may increase.
It’s also okay to hold onto a book that has significant personal or sentimental value for you. This type of book, even if it’s not worth much money, can be priceless.
You may also wish to donate your book to a library or archive. Contact the acquisitions department to discuss whether or not you can make a donation.[17][Edit]Tips
Store your book safely and securely in a cool, dry environment away from dust and natural light. Consult an archivist or antiquarian for storage advice if you’re not sure how to protect your book.[18]
If you’re listing your book for sale online, be sure to clearly describe and/or photograph all signs of damage. Be truthful in your assessment and don’t over-exaggerate the quality of your copy.[19][Edit]Warnings
Handle your book with clean and dry hands to avoid transferring any dirt and skin oils to the pages or covers.[20]
Avoid spreading the pages open and flat. This will damage the book’s binding. Instead, prop up the covers using a soft pillow or V-shaped book support.[21][Edit]Related wikiHows
Research the Value of Rare Books
Find Comic Book Values
Repair a Book’s Binding
Protect Hardcover Book Corners[Edit]References↑ https://www.blifaloo.com/book-worth

↑ https://www.prattlibrary.org/research/tools/index.aspx?cat=99&id=4695

↑ https://www.prattlibrary.org/research/tools/index.aspx?cat=99&id=4695

↑ https://library.si.edu/departments/special-collections/information-old-books

↑ https://www.prattlibrary.org/research/tools/index.aspx?cat=99&id=4695

↑ http://www.ioba.org/pages/resources/book-terminology/

↑ https://library.si.edu/departments/special-collections/information-old-books

↑ https://library.si.edu/departments/special-collections/information-old-books

↑ https://www.abebooks.com/books/old-books-antique-appraising-pricing/book-values.shtml

↑ http://www.ioba.org/pages/resources/condition-definitions/

↑ http://www.trussel.com/books/lucas04.htm

↑ https://www.blifaloo.com/book-worth

↑ https://library.si.edu/departments/special-collections/information-old-books

↑ https://www.nypl.org/node/5650

↑ https://www.abebooks.com/books/old-books-antique-appraising-pricing/book-values.shtml

↑ https://library.si.edu/departments/special-collections/information-old-books

↑ https://library.si.edu/departments/special-collections/information-old-books

↑ https://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/books.html

↑ http://www.ioba.org/pages/resources/condition-definitions/

↑ https://library.pdx.edu/news/the-proper-handling-of-rare-books-manuscripts/

↑ https://www.loc.gov/preservation/care/books.html

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