How to Study Engineering

Being an engineering student is challenging, but the payoff is worth it. With your engineering degree, you can find a fulfilling career in a field that excites you. While in school, it’s important to hone your skills in math and physics; these fields are necessary no matter what type of engineer you want to be. You should also pick an engineering specialty and choose a course schedule that aligns with your goals. Since engineering programs are rigorous, it’s important to attend each class and also devote plenty of time to studying outside the classroom. Once you work on your study skills, you’ll be able to ace your tests and projects. Finally, take the time to develop your professional network. That can help you get the job that you want.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Honing Your Skills and Choosing a Course of Study
Focus on excelling in math and physics courses. Nearly all engineering programs will require several semesters of math courses. Work with your advisor to set up a 4-year plan to complete all of your requirements. You can expect to take several courses in calculus and engineering-focused math. You will also need several semesters of physics.[1]
Math and physics both rely heavily on learning and using formulas. Work to memorize the most commonly used ones, and understand how to apply them.
If you are struggling with the concepts, ask your professor for help. You can also visit the tutoring center at your school.
If you hate math, engineering is probably not the right career for you.
Develop problem-solving skills to enhance critical thinking abilities. A career in engineering will be based on solving problems, whether that means figuring out how to design a safer bridge or figuring out safety procedures for dealing with chemicals. The sooner you begin thinking like a problem-solver, the more successful you’ll be. Learn to figure out answers for yourself and avoid relying on others to tell you what to do.[2]
For example, maybe you’re stumped by your calculus homework. Spend some time working it out for yourself. You could try using a different way of applying an equation, perhaps.
This doesn’t mean that it’s not okay to ask for help. It is! But stretch yourself by trying to find the answer yourself first.
Choose the field of engineering that interests you. There are several different types of engineers. Spend some time thinking about what kind of job you want and then choose your specialty based on that. You can ask your academic advisor to go over the different options with you. Some of the most common fields include:[3]
Civil engineering. This career involves planning and completing infrastructure projects, such as highways and bridges.
Electrical engineering. The focus in this field is inventing and improving the electrical functions of machines like cell phones and cameras.
Mechanical engineering. These engineers invent, make, and improve items like seat belts, refrigerators, and elevators.
Chemical engineering. People in this field work on safely using chemicals and finding new ways to use them.
Software engineering. Software engineers apply math and the principles of computer science to improve and create things like games and computer operating systems.
Take a variety of engineering classes for supplemental knowledge. Obviously, you’ll spend a lot of time taking classes in your concentration. But make sure to save some time in your schedule to take other engineering classes, too. In engineering, it’s not just the subject matter that is important. It’s also useful to learn how other engineers approach problems.[4]
For example, if you are studying mechanical engineering, it might be helpful to include some classes in civil engineering. These fields overlap sometimes regarding the components of buildings.
Take courses outside of engineering to broaden your skill set. Like most careers, engineering requires a wide variety of skills. Seek out classes that will enhance your work as an engineer.[5]
Try taking a visual design class to learn how to better display your ideas visually. A writing class can help you convey your thoughts and ideas in a compelling manner.[Edit]Getting the Most Out of Each Class
Attend every class and sit near the front. Engineering courses are challenging and often cover a lot of material in each class session. In order to succeed, it’s important to be present in class (both physically and mentally). Show up on time and be ready to pay attention and concentrate.[6]
Sit where you can see the materials presented and where you can easily hear the professor.
Ask questions during class if you don’t understand the concepts.
If you have to miss class, borrow the notes from a classmate.
Get a good night’s sleep before the lecture. Being well-rested makes it easier to concentrate.
Do the reading before class to feel prepared. Read the entire chapter or section before the relevant lecture. This will help you understand what the professor is talking about. It’s also a good way to identify potential questions that you would like to ask during class.[7]
Make sure to take notes as you read. You can jot down helpful examples and make note of anything you don’t understand.
Take good notes so that they are useful to you later. Write down any formulas that your instructor indicates are important to know. But take care to write down more than just the math. Your notes should also include information about how to apply the math and the logic behind it.[8]
Don’t worry about trying to scribble down every single word the professor says. Instead, focus on concepts they emphasize, repeat, or spend a lot of time talking about.
Ask your instructor if they post PowerPoints online. If they do, you can annotate them with your own notes.
Keep a separate notebook of important information for easy access. There are some key concepts and formulas that you will use in multiple classes. Copy these in your regular notes, but also write them down in a separate notebook. That way, you can easily find all of your most important information.[9]
Develop a relationship with your professor so they can help you. Many students feel intimidated by their professors. But try not to be! They are actually there to help you. Take time at the beginning of the semester to introduce yourself to the professor. That way, they will know who you are if email them with a question.[10]
Take advantage of office hours. Professors set this time aside to meet with students, so make it a point to stop by and get help when you need it.[Edit]Doing Well on Tests and Projects
Form a study group at the beginning of the semester. Ask some other students in your program or in your classes if they want to join your study group. Study groups are beneficial for all students, but they’re especially helpful for engineering students. Some of the benefits of working in groups include:[11]
Learning new ways to approach the material
Exposure to creative problem solving
Experience working with a team, which most engineers do
Having a more enjoyable time studying
Teach the material to someone else to master it. This is considered one of the best ways to retain information. Being able to teach something means that you really understand the material. Practice teaching someone else how to use a formula, for example. Go over the material until your “student” has a good understanding. By that point, you’ll likely be very confident with your own understanding.[12]
This is a great activity to try in your study group.
Copy your notes to review the material. Writing things down helps you retain the information. Every 2-3 weeks, copy the notes that you have taken while reading and attending lectures. Each copy should be a little shorter. As you become more familiar with the material, you won’t feel like you have to write down every single detail.[13]
Each time you copy your notes, write a 1-2 page summary of the information. You can use that to review for tests.
Give yourself plenty of time to study for tests and prepare projects. Don’t try to cram the night before an exam. You’ll end up feeling stressed and exhausted. Instead, make it a habit to review the material each week. You can then add some extra hours to study each day during the week prior to the exam.[14]
Similarly, don’t wait until the night before a project is due to start working on it. As soon as your professor gives you an assignment, figure out how you are going to approach the topic.
Add material to your presentation over time, and refine it as necessary. All you’ll have to do the week before it’s due is to give it a polish!
Read each test question carefully and check your work. When you’re taking a test, make sure to take time to look at the entire question. This can prevent simple mistakes. Neatly show your work for each problem. Not only will you get partial credit, but your instructor will be able to give you better feedback if they can see where you went wrong.[15]
Start with the easy questions first. That can help you feel more confident about the rest of the exam.[Edit]Building Your Network
Seek out internships to gain experience. Start looking for summer internships early in your academic career. Internships indicate that you are motivated and a hard worker, traits that will make you attractive to potential employers. Internships can also help you figure out what kind of career you would like to have.[16]
Talk to the career center at your school, or your advisor or program director for advice on finding an internship.
Develop a group of mentors that can advise you. Corporations have boards of directors that provide advice and direction. You’re not a corporation, but you can also gather a group of people that can do the same for you. Forge relationships with your professors and mentors and ask them for advice.[17]
You can also learn a lot by talking to more advanced students.
If you have a family friend that works in engineering, ask if you can pick their brain.
Attend extracurricular events to stay current in the field and meet people. Engineering is a field that changes regularly. It’s important to stay up to date on trends and new developments. Make it a point to attend any lectures that relate to your field that are sponsored by your college or community. You can also meet new contacts to add to your network at such events.[18]
You can also join a networking group on campus. That will allow you to meet other engineering students and alumni in your field of study.[Edit]Tips
Make sure to get enough rest and eat a healthy diet. If you don’t take care of your physical health, it will be hard to find the energy to study.
Save time for socializing. Doing something fun will keep you from feeling like you’re drowning in coursework.[Edit]References↑ https://personal.utdallas.edu/~dlm/How%20to%20get%20an%20A%202006.pdf

↑ https://www.educationcorner.com/engineering-study-skills-guide.html

↑ https://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/2019-02-25/how-to-evaluate-different-types-of-engineering-degrees-jobs

↑ https://www.electricalengineeringschools.org/20-tips-for-engineering-students/

↑ https://www.electricalengineeringschools.org/20-tips-for-engineering-students/

↑ https://personal.utdallas.edu/~dlm/How%20to%20get%20an%20A%202006.pdf

↑ https://personal.utdallas.edu/~dlm/How%20to%20get%20an%20A%202006.pdf

↑ https://personal.utdallas.edu/~dlm/How%20to%20get%20an%20A%202006.pdf

↑ https://www.electricalengineeringschools.org/20-tips-for-engineering-students/

↑ https://personal.utdallas.edu/~dlm/How%20to%20get%20an%20A%202006.pdf

↑ https://www.educationcorner.com/engineering-study-skills-guide.html

↑ https://www.electricalengineeringschools.org/20-tips-for-engineering-students/

↑ https://personal.utdallas.edu/~dlm/How%20to%20get%20an%20A%202006.pdf

↑ https://personal.utdallas.edu/~dlm/How%20to%20get%20an%20A%202006.pdf

↑ https://personal.utdallas.edu/~dlm/How%20to%20get%20an%20A%202006.pdf

↑ https://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/professors-guide/2009/12/02/10-tips-for-success-for-engineering-students-

↑ https://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/professors-guide/2009/12/02/10-tips-for-success-for-engineering-students-

↑ https://www.electricalengineeringschools.org/20-tips-for-engineering-students/

Read More

Today in History for 11th October 2019

Historical Events

1521 – Pope Leo X titles King Henry VIII of England “Defender of the Faith”
1863 – Skirmish at Rheatown/Henderson’s Mill, Tennessee
1913 – Philadelphia A’s beat NY Giants, 4 games to 1 in 10th World Series
1961 – USAF Major Robert M White takes X-15 to 66,100m
1973 – Héctor José Cámpora is elected President of Argentina
1981 – Yanks beat Brewers 7-3 and win only Eastern Championship Series

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1820 – Alfred Washington Ellet, American civil engineer and Brigadier General (Union Army), born in Bucks County, Pennsylvania (d. 1895)
1925 – Elmore Leonard, American writer (Glitz, Mr Majestyk, Touch, 52 Pick-Up), born in New Orleans, Louisiana (d. 2013)
1937 – Georgi Vladimirovich Machinski, Russian cosmonaut, born in Moscow, Russia
1939 – Franklin Sonn, South African union leader (South African workers), born in Vosburg, South Africa
1944 – Mike Fiore, American baseball player (Kansas City Royals), born in Brooklyn, New York
1972 – Cherokee Parks, American NBA center (Dallas Mavericks, Minn Timberwolves), born in Huntington Beach, California

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

965 – Bruno I, archbishop of Cologne/duke of Lutheran, dies at about 40
1705 – Guillaume Amontons, French physicist, dies at 42
1993 – Jess Thomas, American tenor known for his singing in Richard Wagner operas, dies at 66
1996 – Arthur Walter Lucas, first Chief Restorer of the National Gallery, London, dies at 80
2003 – Franklyn Perring, English botanist (co-author of Atlas of the British Flora, 1962), dies of cancer at 76
2008 – Jörg Haider, Austrian far-right politician (b. 1950)

More Famous Deaths »

Read More

How to Plant Succulents

Succulents are beautiful plants that can add some pizzazz to your garden or home. They have a reputation for being a fairly hardy plant, but they do require some specific conditions when growing. For instance, they need well-draining soil because they don’t tolerate wet roots well. You can plant succulents in containers or in the garden, but either way, take care to make sure your plants are happy and healthy.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Placing Succulents in Containers
Pick a shallow terracotta container with drainage holes. Terracotta works well for succulents because it’s porous, allowing water to seep out through the pot.[1] A shallow pot is fine because succulents don’t have deep roots, but if you get a taller pot, it’s not a huge issue.[2] In fact, a tall pot can be good if you get a lot of rain, as it provides more space to draw the water from the succulents’ roots.[3]
Succulents will not tolerate standing water, so if your container doesn’t have drainage holes, you’ll need to drill some.
Keep in mind that the succulent will be contained by the size of the pot. That is, if you choose a big pot, it will get much bigger, but if you keep it in a smaller pot, it will generally stick to that size.
Fill the container two-thirds full with a potting mix made for succulents and cacti. Succulents do best with well-drained soil. Find a pre-mixed potting soil labeled for succulents and cacti, which should serve your plants’ needs well. Typically, it will have a higher percentage of inorganic material like perlite, pumice, or crushed lava than a regular potting mix.[4] Put a paper towel or mesh in the bottom so the soil doesn’t spill out of the drainage holes, and then fill the container up about two-thirds of the way.[5]
If you can’t find one specifically for succulents and cacti, pick one that’s labeled “fast” or “quick” draining.
To make your own mix, combine 50% regular potting soil and add 50% crushed lava, perlite, or pumice.
Plant your largest succulent in the center and smaller ones near the edges of the pot. Take the largest plant out of the small pot it came in and nestle it in the center of the container. Arrange the smaller plants around the bigger one, grouping similar plants together. Don’t dig holes; just set the plants on top of the soil.[6]
However, don’t overcrowd the pot. Give the succulents some breathing room so they can get the nutrients they need to thrive. Allow at least between plants.
Group succulents together that have similar growth requirements. For instance, put ones together that require the same amount of sun or that are from the same region, meaning they grow in similar conditions.
Add soil around the plants and pebbles on top. Once you have an arrangement you like, use a small shovel to spoon more soil in the spaces around the plants to keep them stable. Fill in the area around the base of each plant.[7]
To help keep the soil in place, pour crushed rocks or small pebbles on top. This also helps keep the base of your plants drier.[Edit]Putting Succulents in Your Garden
Pick succulents that can handle the winter if you live in an area with cold spells. Unless you live in a year-round warm climate, you’ll need to choose plants that tolerate the cold. Agave and yucca are good choices for outdoor gardens and will do well in many climates.[8]
Check your hardiness zone to see what grows well in your area.
If your area gets very cold, opt for sedums and sempervivums, which come from the Alpines and can handle the cold.[9]
Choose an area that provides 2-3 hours a day of dappled sunlight. While succulents like some sun, full sun is too much to keep them happy. Pick an area that gets partial shade, either because it’s filtered through leaves above or because it only gets sun part of the day.[10]
However, always check what your specific succulent needs by researching it or reading the label that comes with it![11]
Add inorganic matter to the soil to ensure it will drain well. Succulents need extra drainage whether they are in pots or in the ground. Amend your garden soil so it’s at least 60% inorganic material. Spread it out over the area you’ve tilled up in an even layer, and then work it in with a shovel or till, going down .[12]
You can use perlite, pumice, or crushed lava, just to name a few.
Space the succulents apart. Allow at least a few inches between each plant to give them room to grow. Measure the space from the outer edges of the plant, not the root. Many types of succulents will spread quickly, filling in the gaps and creating ground cover.
Dig a hole big enough for your plant’s roots and drop the plant in. Use a trowel or a small shovel to make a hole in the soil. It should be just big enough for the plant’s root ball. Lower the plant in the ground and then leave it alone. You don’t need to fill in around it when it’s in the ground. The soil will settle into place lightly around it.[13]
This process allows the plant’s roots to expand and breathe.[Edit]Caring for Succulents
Wait until the soil is completely dry before you water. Succulents don’t need much water, so you can wait until the soil dries out. Check the soil once a day until you get an idea of how often your succulents will need watering. When it’s dry, water the soil until its damp and water runs out the drainage holes.[14]
The time between waterings will depend on your humidity levels, the size of the pot or garden bed, how well the soil drains, and how big the plant is, so you really just need to check it often at first.
Some plants may be able to go as long as 2 weeks between waterings, while others might need it as often as every 4 days or so. During succulents’ growing season from late spring to early fall, try watering at least 1 a week.[15]
Keep your potted succulents outside when it’s warm. Succulents like circulating air, and they’ll get more of that outside. Place them in an area where there’s partial shade and about 2-3 hours of sunlight a day.[16]
If it’s cold year-round, you can grow succulents indoors. However, you’ll need to be more attentive to their needs.
Move frost-intolerant potted succulents inside during the winter. Some of these plants come from desert-like climates and won’t tolerate frost and cold as well. Bring these plants in during the winter months if they won’t handle the cold.[17]
If your plants are in the ground, cover them when temperatures dip below freezing.
When you bring your plants outside again, acclimate them gradually. For instance, take them out for about 4 hours each day, slowly lengthening the time they are outside over the course of a week.[18]
Protect your succulents from temperatures above . If the temperatures are going to be above , most succulents will appreciate more shade, as the hot sun can burn their leaves. Move potted plants to a cooler location or use an awning or larger plants to provide shade for plants in the ground.[19]
Apply a well-balanced fertilizer in the spring. Succulents don’t need a lot of fertilizer. Try giving half the amount the directions suggest to your succulents. You can apply it in early spring once the chance of frost has passed.[20]
Pick a well-balanced fertilizer with equal parts of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium (labeled as “NPK”). For instance, look for one labeled 5-5-5 NPK.
You can get liquid fertilizers you dilute in water, fertilizer spikes, or fertilizer crumbles.
Prune succulents only to remove damaged or dead leaves. Most succulents don’t need pruning. However, if you notice parts have been damaged, you can trim those off at the base of the leaf. Damaged leaves will change color and wilt or rot.[21]
You can also trim succulents if they get too leggy (e.g., if they have very long stems). Leave of stem behind on the head. Then, you can dry it out for a day and replant it with the shorter stem.
Roots will also grow from single leaves of succulents if you let them dry out for a day or two.[22]
[Edit]References↑ https://www.countryliving.com/gardening/a42264/how-to-grow-succulents/

↑ https://www.southernliving.com/home-garden/gardens/how-to-plant-succulents?slide=252207#252207

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCmmhNpFTfE&feature=youtu.be&t=98

↑ https://www.sunset.com/garden/8-foolproof-ways-to-keep-your-succulents-alive

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCmmhNpFTfE&feature=youtu.be&t=148

↑ https://www.southernliving.com/home-garden/gardens/how-to-plant-succulents?slide=252219#252219

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCmmhNpFTfE&feature=youtu.be&t=161

↑ https://www.southernliving.com/garden/succulents/growing-succulent-garden

↑ https://www.gardendesign.com/succulents/planting.html

↑ https://www.southernliving.com/garden/succulents/growing-succulent-garden

↑ https://www.gardendesign.com/succulents/planting.html

↑ https://www.gardendesign.com/succulents/planting.html

↑ https://www.gardendesign.com/succulents/planting.html

↑ https://www.countryliving.com/gardening/a42264/how-to-grow-succulents/

↑ http://www.csssj.org/welcome_visitors/basic_culture.html

↑ https://www.sunset.com/garden/8-foolproof-ways-to-keep-your-succulents-alive

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCmmhNpFTfE&feature=youtu.be&t=196

↑ https://www.gardendesign.com/succulents/planting.html

↑ https://www.sunset.com/garden/8-foolproof-ways-to-keep-your-succulents-alive

↑ https://www.apartmenttherapy.com/succulent-care-257056

↑ https://www.unce.unr.edu/publications/files/ho/2016/sp1601.pdf

↑ https://gardenerspath.com/how-to/propagation/succulents-five-easy-steps/

Read More