How to Make Espresso Powder

Espresso powder is most often used by bakers to enhance the flavor of brownies, cookies, and chocolate cakes. You can buy it from specialty stores, but you can also make a batch of your own espresso powder at home. All you need is espresso beans, a baking sheet, and a coffee grinder. Use your espresso powder to amp up baked goods, make a delicious steak rub, and even whip together a delicious hot beverage.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Roasting the Beans
Use 1 cup (200 grams) of espresso beans to make 1 cup of espresso powder. Depending on how often you use espresso powder, you could make a bigger or smaller batch. Fresh beans that have been newly purchased will produce the best flavor, so try to make your espresso powder before your beans go stale.[1]Beans generally stay fresh for about 2 weeks after they’ve been opened. If they’re in a special container with a degassing valve, they could last for up to 6 months. for about 1 hour. Run the baked grounds through a grinder to pulverize them even further, and then store them in an airtight container.[2]}}
Preheat the oven to . The goal of baking the espresso beans is to slightly roast them while also drying them out even further. This helps them be ground to a much finer consistency.[3]
If you use a temperature lower than , you’ll need to increase the total cooking time to compensate. For example, cooking at would require about 1.5 hours of baking time.
Spread the espresso beans over a baking sheet in a single layer. Use an unlined, ridged baking sheet. The ridge will keep the beans from accidentally spilling over the edge. Try to space the beans apart a little bit so that the hot air can get between all of them.[4]A perk to baking the espresso beans is that your house will smell fantastic for a little while!
Bake the espresso beans for about 1 hour to give them a toasted flavor. Set a timer and let the oven do its work. There’s no need to check on the beans or flip them during the 1-hour cook time.[5]If you skip the baking step, the beans could create a powder that is a little too bitter for your baking needs.
Let the beans cool off for about 10 minutes once they’re done baking. Once the timer goes off, use an oven mitt to remove the baking sheet from the oven. Set the baking sheet on top of the stove and let the beans cool off until they’re no longer hot to the touch.[6]If you let the beans cool off for longer than 10 minutes, that is totally fine. 10 minutes is just the minimum so that the beans aren’t still hot when you go to grind them.[Edit]Grinding and Storing the Powder
Grind the espresso beans in small 1/4 cup (50 gram) batches. Smaller batches will make a finer powder. If you did the entire cup at once, it would be hard to really grind things down to a fine consistency. Use a coffee grinder set to the finest grind possible and pulse each batch for 15 to 20 seconds.[7]
Transfer the espresso powder to an airtight container. Once the espresso beans have been ground into a fine, powder-like substance, use a spoon to transfer them into a storage container. Pick a container that is resealable or that has a tight-fitting lid.[8]Keep in mind that a plastic container will absorb the smell and oil from the powder, so you may want to designate a specific container for your espresso powder.
Store the espresso powder in a cool, dry location for up to 6 months. If you made a big batch of espresso powder, rest assured that you have ample time to use it all up. Put it in a cupboard or pantry where it won’t come into contact with any moisture.[9]After 6 months, the powder will still be technically good, it just won’t be as fresh or the best quality anymore.[Edit]Adding Espresso Powder to Recipes
Add espresso powder to your baking recipes for a rich, deep flavor. For most cookies, brownies, and chocolate cakes, add just a teaspoon (2 grams) of espresso powder to really enhance the flavor of the recipe. Add an additional teaspoon (2 grams) for an actual coffee flavor.[10]
Don’t worry—a little espresso powder doesn’t have to make your sweets taste like coffee. It really just enhances the flavors that are already in a sweet treat, especially when chocolate is involved.
Create a smokey steak rub with espresso powder, paprika, and brown sugar. Use 1 teaspoon (2 grams) of smoked paprika, 1 teaspoon (2 grams) of light brown sugar, 2 teaspoons (4 grams) of espresso powder, and 2 teaspoons (4 grams) of salt. Mix them together in a small bowl and sprinkle the rub onto both sides of a steak before you cook it. Cook the steak however you prefer and enjoy![11]Feel free to mix up the rub by adding different spices. Cinnamon or chili powder would make a great addition!
Make mornings special with cinnamon-sugar-espresso toast. Combine 1 tablespoon (12.5 grams) of sugar, 1 teaspoon (2 grams) of cinnamon, and 1 teaspoon (2 grams) of espresso powder. Make your toast, butter it, and sprinkle the sugar mixture overtop.[12]If you don’t like butter, use a butter substitute. One or the other is necessary, otherwise, the sugar mixture won’t have anything to stick to.
Enjoy a hot mocha toddy during the colder months. In a saucepan over medium heat, mix together 1/4 cup (50 grams) of light brown sugar, 1 tablespoon (7 grams) of cocoa powder, 2 tablespoons (12 grams) of espresso powder, of milk, and of heavy cream. Heat the mixture until it is almost boiling, and then distribute it amongst mugs. Top the drink with whipped cream sprinkled with espresso powder.[13]To add an extra kick to your hot toddy, pour of vodka into the pan along with the other ingredients.[Edit]Tips
If you don’t have or can’t make espresso powder, use double the amount called for of instant coffee. You could also sub out some liquid from the recipe and use that same amount of liquid espresso.
Espresso powder is caffeinated, so use decaf espresso beans if you want to steer clear of the caffeine.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Espresso beans
Baking sheet
Coffee grinder
Airtight storage container
Oven mitt[Edit]References↑ https://addapinch.com/espresso-powder-recipe/

↑ http://brighteyedbaker.com/confessions101/diy-espresso-grounds/

↑ https://addapinch.com/espresso-powder-recipe/

↑ https://youtu.be/0xPmdiivoYs?t=7

↑ https://addapinch.com/espresso-powder-recipe/

↑ https://addapinch.com/espresso-powder-recipe/

↑ https://addapinch.com/espresso-powder-recipe/

↑ https://addapinch.com/espresso-powder-recipe/

↑ https://addapinch.com/espresso-powder-recipe/

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/espresso-powder-in-the-kitchen-whats-it-good-for-164429

↑ https://youtu.be/DC2YajAejHw?t=42

↑ https://youtu.be/DC2YajAejHw?t=120

↑ https://youtu.be/DC2YajAejHw?t=236

Read More

Today in History for 18th October 2019

Historical Events

1534 – New pursuit of French protestants
1685 – French King Louis XIV revokes Edict of Nantes cancelling rights of French Protestants
1941 – Soviet spy Richard Sorge arrested in Tokyo
1967 – Soviet Venera 4 becomes 1st probe to send data back from Venus
1967 – AL votes to allow Athletics to move from KC to Oakland and expand league to 12 teams in 1971 with KC and Seattle teams
1989 – Hungary revises its constitution after the fall of its Communist regime

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1668 – Johan Georg IV, elector of Saxony (1691-94)
1891 – 1891 Václav Kálik, Czech composer, born in Opava; (d. 1951)
1902 – Pascual Jordan, German physicist (d. 1980)
1925 – Wim van Gennep, Dutch singer/keyboardist (Heikrekels)
1956 – Craig Bartlett, American animator
1966 – Angela Visser, Neth, Miss Universe (1989)

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1876 – Francis Preston Blair, American journalist and newspaper editor (Washington Globe), dies at 85
1893 – Lucy Stone, American abolitionist (US Woman’s Suffrage Association), dies at 75
1921 – King Ludwig III of Bavaria (b. 1845)
1955 – José Ortega y Gasset, Spanish philosopher and author (The Revolt of the Masses), dies at 72
1982 – Paul Lebeau, Flemish writer (Last Rose, Xanthippe), dies at 74
2005 – Bill King, American sports broadcaster (b. 1927)

More Famous Deaths »

Read More

How to Peel a Pumpkin

Pumpkins are famous for being turned into jack-o’-lanterns, but this type of squash plant can also be used for making many delicious dishes. In order to do so, however, the skin must be peeled off. Pumpkins used for cooking, unlike those used for carving, have thicker skins that cover the fleshy fruit. Peeling the skin off is not a hassle with a vegetable peeler or sharp knife and a little dedication.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Peeling with a Vegetable Peeler
Wash the pumpkin to remove dirt and contaminants and soften the skin. Remove dirt and other contaminants from the skin by washing the pumpkin under warm water. Removing dirt keeps the pumpkin from beginning to rot, and warm water soften the skin, making it easier to peel off. Dry the pumpkin with a clean towel or let it air dry.
Cut the rounded top and bottom off of the pumpkin to create flat surfaces. Place the pumpkin on its side on a sturdy cutting board. Using a sharp kitchen knife, cut about off of the top and bottom of the pumpkin so that it has two flat sides.The pumpkin should be able to steadily sit on its top and bottom after you make the cuts.
Set up the pumpkin and the peeler. Turn the pumpkin on its side on a cutting board so that one flat side faces towards you and the other flat side is away from you. Place the peeler in one hand and use the other hand to hold the pumpkin steady while you peel.
Peel the skin using the peeler, starting from the side closest to you. Similar to peeling a potato, push the peeler in a straight line, starting from the side closest to you and moving to the side farthest from you.[1]You should aim to make peels that are about wide and are as long as the pumpkin’s side.
Try to only cut off the skin and leave the flesh intact. The skin is the outermost layer that covers the thicker flesh.
Rotate the pumpkin to continue the peeling process. As you finish peeling sections, turn the pumpkin over to different sides.[2] Before continuing to peel on another side, remember to steady the pumpkin with your free hand.
Inspect the pumpkin and check to make sure all of the skin is peeled. You might have missed some spots as you were peeling. Rotate the pumpkin and check to see if you need to go back and peel places that you did not completely peel.[Edit]Peeling with a Knife
Prepare the pumpkin for peeling. Wash the pumpkin off and let it dry. Cut off the top and bottom to create flat surfaces.
Place the pumpkin on its side and get your knife ready. Similar to using a vegetable peeler, you will want to place the pumpkin on a cutting board, with one of the flat surfaces facing towards your body. Hold the knife in your fist with the blade pointing outwards.[3]
Cut away strips of skin by pushing the knife along the side of the pumpkin. You should be able to see where the inner flesh of the pumpkin meets the outer skin. Push the blade of your knife down the pumpkin from the end closest to you towards the other end. As you finish sections, rotate the pumpkin until it is completely peeled.Make sure to push the knife slowly and deliberately to protect your fingers from getting cut. Doing so also reduces the risk of cutting out the flesh.[4]
Check to make sure all of the skin is peeled off. Rotate the pumpkin fully and see if there are any spots you missed before peeling them away.[Edit]Cooking the Pumpkin before Peeling
Prepare the pumpkin by washing and slicing it into smaller sections. Depending on how big your kitchen appliances are, cut the pumpkin into halves or into more sections. After doing so, use a large spoon to scoop out the seeds and other fibers from the pumpkin’s inside and place them into a bowl.The inner seeds of the pumpkin are edible and make for a yummy snack! You can save them for later or choose to roast them when you cook the pumpkin.[5]
Bake the pumpkin in an oven. Pre-heat the oven to degrees. Place the pumpkin halves or sections onto a baking sheet. Once the oven warms up, put the pumpkin into it and cook for 15 to 45 minutes, depending on the sizes of the sections.[6]Check on the progress by sticking a fork into the flesh; when the fork easily punctures the flesh, take the pumpkin out and let it cool.
Cook the pumpkin using a microwave. Place the sections of the pumpkin into a microwave-safe dish with a small amount of water.[7] Microwave the pumpkin for approximately 10 minutes, checking the progress using a fork. Once the pumpkin flesh can be easily punctured with a fork. Let the pumpkin out and let it cool.
Depending on the microwave wattage and the size of the pumpkin slices, cooking time may vary. Keep an eye on it by checking on the pumpkin periodically as it cooks.
Peel the pumpkin using the vegetable peeler method or the knife method. The skin should come off much more easily, but still be cautious when using sharp kitchen instruments.[8] Look over the pumpkin and peel away any spots you may have missed.[Edit]Warnings
When using sharp cutting instruments, always cut away from your body to minimize the possibility of harming yourself.[Edit]References↑ https://www.finedininglovers.com/article/whats-best-way-peel-and-cut-pumpkin

↑ https://youtu.be/JCO_9bwo6VA?t=52s

↑ https://theneffkitchen.com.au/cut-pumpkin-easy-way/

↑ https://www.finedininglovers.com/article/whats-best-way-peel-and-cut-pumpkin

↑ https://www.tasteofhome.com/article/roast-pumpkin-seeds/

↑ https://www.easyanddelish.com/peeling-pumpkin-easily/

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-i-make-peeling-pumpkin-a-little-easier-196151

↑ https://www.easyanddelish.com/peeling-pumpkin-easily/

Read More