How to Bake Sculpey Clay

Sculpey clay is a type of polymer clay that can be molded into almost any shape and then hardened in your oven at home. It’s a great material to use in jewelry making, sculpture building, and charm making. Baking Sculpey clay might seem intimidating, but if you mold your clay, bake it at the right temperature, and cool it slowly, you can have professional and glossy looking Sculpey figures in no time.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Molding Your Clay
Protect your surface with parchment or wax paper. Clay can be sticky and leave a mess if it touches surfaces like tables or countertops. You will be working on a flat surface, so lay a layer of parchment paper or wax paper down and secure it with tape before you start working with your clay.[1]
If you do get stubborn clay stuck to your surfaces, rubbing alcohol can help dissolve the clay and makes it easy to clean up.
Knead your clay gently for 3 to 5 minutes until it is soft. When you take your clay out of the package, it will be stiff and hard to mold. Hold a small piece of clay in between your fingers and knead it gently until you can form it into shapes. You can do this one small piece of dough at a time until you have enough to do your project.[2]
Create the shapes that you want to bake. Sculpey clay is great for modeling tiny figures, beads, or even small jewelry pieces. You can make items that are as large and as detailed as you’d like. Large and thick clay will take longer to bake than small thin clay.[3]There are many specific tools you can buy at craft stores to use on Sculpey clay, like craft knives and rolling tools.
You can also use kitchen tools like steak knives and rolling pins to help in your clay molding as long as you wash them before using them on food.[Edit]Heating Sculpey Clay
Preheat your oven to . Most Sculpey clay is baked at , but you should double check on your package to see what it recommends. You should not have your oven at a higher temperature, because you want your clay to bake slowly so it doesn’t burn.[4]
If you want to be sure that your oven is at the correct temperature, you can use an external oven thermometer to double check. These are available at most home goods stores.
Sculpey clay does not release toxic fumes as it bakes, so your oven will not be damaged.[5]
Line a baking tray with parchment paper. Parchment paper will provide an extra protective layer for both your clay figures and your baking tray. You can also use wax paper to line your baking tray.[6]
If you don’t have parchment or wax paper, you can use aluminium foil, but it will leave a shiny mark on whatever part of the clay touches it while baking.
Place your clay figures on the baking tray spaced evenly apart. Depending on the size of your figures, you can bake multiple clay projects at a time. If you do have more than one piece on a baking tray, make sure that they are not touching each other and have about in between them, just in case they fall over in the oven.[7]
Bake your sculptures for 15 minutes per of thickness. Estimate or measure the thickest part of your sculpture and add 15 minutes to your bake time per of thickness. Check on your clay every 10 minutes or so to make sure that it is not burning.[8]
If your clay starts turning brown or smoking, turn your oven down right away and take your figures out to cool.
Take your clay out of the oven when your timer is done. There is no way to know if your clay has hardened fully until it is cool, so take your clay out of the oven once your timer runs out. It is better to underbake your clay than to overbake it, so you should take it out even if you think it needs more time.[9][Edit]Cooling and Glazing the Clay
Let your clay cool for 10 minutes. Leave your figures on the baking tray and let them cool for about 10 minutes. They might still look soft when they are warm from the oven, but they will harden as they cool down.[10]
If your clay broke while it was in the oven, you can use Sculpey glue to attach two pieces together and bake them again. Make sure to do this before adding any paint or glaze.
Squeeze your clay figures lightly to test their firmness. Test each of your clay pieces for how hard they are by gently pressing on them to see if they hold up. If your fingers make indents in your clay or your figures bend easily, they are not firm enough and you should put them back in the oven for 2 minutes at a time until they are hard.[11]
Apply Sculpey glaze the clay for a glossy finish. If you want your clay figures to look sleek and polished, you can apply a glaze made specifically for Sculpey clay after your figures are baked. Use a paint brush and lightly coat your figure in Sculpey glaze and let it dry for 5 minutes, or until it is no longer tacky to the touch.[12]Make sure to wash off your paint brush after you use Sculpey glaze, because it will harden on your brush.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
2 sheets of parchment paper
1 baking tray
Sculpey glaze (optional)[Edit]References↑ http://www.polymerclayweb.com/AboutPolymerClay/TheBasics/GettingStarted.aspx

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCIdmU6m8LE&feature=youtu.be&t=56

↑ http://www.polymerclayweb.com/AboutPolymerClay/TheBasics/GettingStarted.aspx

↑ http://www.earthguild.com/products/riff/rpolymer.htm#targetText=Sculpey%20does%20best%20at%20about,per%20quarter%20inch%20of%20thickness.

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZStexRD7HI&feature=youtu.be&t=691

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZStexRD7HI&feature=youtu.be&t=711

↑ http://www.earthguild.com/products/riff/rpolymer.htm#targetText=Sculpey%20does%20best%20at%20about,per%20quarter%20inch%20of%20thickness.

↑ https://www.polymerclayer.com/baking-polymer-clay.html

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wZStexRD7HI&feature=youtu.be&t=767

↑ https://www.polymerclayer.com/baking-polymer-clay.html

↑ https://www.polymerclayer.com/baking-polymer-clay.html

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvGyuenW9Po&feature=youtu.be&t=135

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Today in History for 20th October 2019

Historical Events

1877 – Franz Schubert’s 2nd Symphony in B premieres
1910 – Soccer team KFC forms in Alkmaar
1964 – Riot at Rolling Stones show in Paris (150 arrested)
1975 – Soviet orbiter Venera 9 becomes the 1st spacecraft to orbit Venus
1990 – Cincinnati beats A’s, 2-1 in Game 4 at Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum to sweep Oakland and win Reds’ 5th Baseball World Series; Reds’ pitcher José Rijo MVP
1995 – Sri Lanka beat West Indies to win Sharjah Champions Trophy final

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1897 – Jevsei G Liberman, Ukrainian economist (Plan, profit, bonuses)
1900 – Rodolfo Halffter, composer
1955 – Thomas Newman, American composer
1955 – Robert ten Brink, Dutch TV host/cabaret artist
1957 – Chris Cowdrey, English cricketer (captain of England 1988) and son of Colin, born in Farnborough, London
1966 – Fred Coury, Johnston NY, rocker (Cinderella-Heartbreak Station)

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1268 – Conrad Hohenstaufen/Conradin, last Duke of Swabia, beheaded in Naples aged 16
1570 – João de Barros, Portuguese historian (b. 1496)
1900 – Naim Frashëri, Albanian poet and writer, dies at 54
1936 – Anne Sullivan [Johanna Macy], American teacher who educated Helen Keller, dies at 70
1994 – Eberhard Feik, German actor (Tatort), dies at 50
2007 – Max McGee, American football player (Green Bay Packers), dies at 75

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How to Make a Leotard

Leotards are essential for gymnastics and ballet, but they can be quite expensive! If you want to make your own leotards, you will save money and you may even find that they fit you better. Start by making a pattern using an existing leotard, and then use the pattern to cut out your fabric and sew the pieces together.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Creating the Leotard Pattern
Choose a leotard that fits you well to create your pattern. You can use an old leotard with sleeves to make a pattern for your new leotard. Make sure that the leotard you use fits you (or the person who will wear the leotard) well.[1]
A 1 piece swimsuit will also work if you do not have a leotard.
Fold the leotard in half lengthwise and trace the outline. Position the folded leotard so that the front side is visible and the sleeves are stacked on top of each other. Fold the sleeves in to trace the body of the leotard. Then, place the leotard onto the pattern or butcher paper. Use a pen or pencil to create an outline of the folded leotard body. Then, unfold the sleeves and trace around these separately to create a sleeve pattern.[2]Make sure to trace right along the edges of the leotard.
Measure and draw a line from the edges. Use a ruler or tape measure to find this location along the edges of the leotard body and sleeves. Then, draw a line with a piece of chalk that follows the outline of the leotard. This will provide the seam allowance for your leotard and sleeves.[3]Make sure that the line goes all the way around the edges of the leotard body and sleeves.
Cut out this piece and mark it as the “front” piece.
Repeat to create a pattern for the back of the leotard. Fold the leotard in the opposite direction and use a pen or pencil to trace the outline.[4] Then, draw a second line outside of the outline for the seam allowance.[5]Keep in mind that the back of the leotard may have a lower back than the front.
Make sure to write “back” on the back piece to indicate what it is.
Draw the straps plus a seam allowance. If the leotard is a tank top style, then you will not need to do this part. If the leotard has straps, then use a ruler or measuring tape to measure their length and width. Then, add the seam allowance and draw a strap onto the paper.[6]For example, if the straps are , then draw a strap that measures .
Cut out this piece and mark it to indicate that it is the pattern for your straps.[Edit]Cutting Out the Leotard Pieces
Choose of fabric that has some give to it. A stretch fabric such as lycra, spandex, or stretch cotton will work well for making a leotard. It is important for the fabric to have some give, but it should also be strong and durable. Select fabric in the color or print of your choice.You may only end up needing around to make your leotard, but get just in case!
Place the pattern pieces on the folded fabric. Fold the fabric in half lengthwise and then place the front and back body and sleeve pattern pieces on the fabric. Align the long, straight edges of the front, back, and sleeve paper pattern pieces with the folded edge of the fabric. Position the strap pattern (if using) away from the folded edges.[7]Make sure that there are no lumps or bumps in the fabric before you place the pattern pieces on it.
Pin or place weights around the outer edges of the pattern pieces. If you use pins, insert a pin every along the edges of the pattern pieces. If you use pattern weights, place a weight about every along the edges of the pattern pieces.[8]Make sure to insert the pins so that they are perpendicular to the edges of the fabric. This will make it easier to remove them when you sew the leotard.
Cut along the edges of the pattern pieces with a sharp pair of scissors. Use the outside of each of the paper pattern pieces as your guides. Cut out a front and back piece along the fold, but do not cut through the folded fabric. Cut the straps all the way around (if using).[9]Be careful not to create any jagged or crooked edges! This will interfere with sewing.[Edit]Sewing the Leotard
Pin the front and back leotard body pieces together. Make sure that the right (print or front) sides are facing each other. Line up the sides, leg openings, and crotch portions of the front and back pieces.[10]Do not pin along the leg openings, armholes, or neckline. These must remain open!
Sew a zigzag stitch along the sides, crotch, and shoulders. Do not sew the neck, arm, and leg openings closed! Set your sewing machine to the zigzag stitch setting. Then, place the pinned leotard pieces under the presser foot. Lower the presser foot and apply gentle pressure to the pedal to start sewing. Sew all the way across the edges and then press the reverse lever to backstitch by about .[11]Remove the pins as you sew. Do not sew over them or you may damage your sewing machine!
Fold the straps or sleeves in half lengthwise and sew from the raw edges. Ensure that the right (front or print) sides are together and the wrong (back or non-print) sides are facing out. Continue using the zigzag stitch to sew along the raw edges of each of the straps to connect the raw edges. Leave the short ends of the straps open.[12]Make sure to remove the pins as you sew.
Keep in mind that you can skip the straps or sleeves if your leotard has a tank top style.
Attach the straps to the top corners of the front and back pieces. Invert the straps and the leotard so that the right sides are facing out. Pin the end of 1 strap to the topmost corner of the leotard. Make sure that the end of the strap is hidden on the inside of the leotard. Sew a zigzag stitch across the end of the strap, and then press the reverse lever to backstitch across the end of the strap.[13]
Repeat this for each of the straps.
Make sure that you do not sew the arm or neck opening closed as you do this!
Cut any loose threads where you have attached the straps.
Pin and sew the sleeves onto the armholes. Turn the leotard body inside out and insert the sleeve arm-first into the leotard. Match up the seam on the armpit area of the leotard with the seam on the armpit area of the sleeve. Place a pin every all the way around the armhole and sleeve with the right sides together and the raw edges even. Then, sew a zigzag stitch around the edges of the sleeve to secure the sleeve onto the leotard body.[14]Make sure to remove the pins as you sew.
Repeat for the other sleeve to complete your leotard.
Trim the excess threads after you finish sewing, and then turn the leotard right side out.
[Edit]Things You’ll Need
A leotard or leotard pattern
of stretch fabric (depending on the size of the leotard you’re making)
Pattern paper or butcher’s paper
Ruler or measuring tape
Scissors
Pen or pencil
Pins
Sewing machine
Thread[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5NhX3jFvck&feature=youtu.be&t=47

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5NhX3jFvck&feature=youtu.be&t=74

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5NhX3jFvck&feature=youtu.be&t=150

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5NhX3jFvck&feature=youtu.be&t=175

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5NhX3jFvck&feature=youtu.be&t=207

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5NhX3jFvck&feature=youtu.be&t=247

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBVzPd9rs9k&feature=youtu.be&t=289

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luEPmlRrPtk&feature=youtu.be&t=36

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luEPmlRrPtk&feature=youtu.be&t=41

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HBVzPd9rs9k&feature=youtu.be&t=289

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luEPmlRrPtk&feature=youtu.be&t=120

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luEPmlRrPtk&feature=youtu.be&t=66

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luEPmlRrPtk&feature=youtu.be&t=205

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcGJuOkZ_ik&feature=youtu.be&t=196

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