How to Wash a Stuffed Animal in a Washing Machine

After being fiercely loved and lugged around for years, plush toys and stuffed animals can get more than a bit scruffy. And if you’re donating, many charities will not take stuffed animals unless they have been washed. Surface washing can’t always get to all of the hard spots. Scrubbing and harsh chemicals may get out stains, but they can also damage fabric or cause colors to fade. Sometimes the best option is to machine wash a stuffed toy. By taking the proper precautions, you can wash your plush or stuffed animal without ruining it!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Preparing to Machine Wash
Make sure that your plush toy’s fabric is washable. Check to see if it has a tag with washing instructions. Toys with any types of stiffeners should be surface washed only. Mohair, wool, rayon plush, and alpaca fur are not to be washed in a machine at all. And if the toy is too old and fragile, too big, or too firmly stuffed, you’ll have to hand wash it.[1]
Sequins or other glued-on, glittery items will probably not survive a wash, either.
If it’s filled with small foam balls, as is the case with Beanie Babies, rather than batting or stuffing, it’s not suitable for machine washing.
Double check for any technology. Look for any music or voice boxes, or any other electronics that aren’t meant for exposure to water.
Remove or secure loose parts. Make sure you don’t lose Teddy’s arm in the wash! Look for any tears or loose parts that need to be stitched. Remove clothing or any other parts that can be separated from the toy. Use scissors to cut any threads or strings that might come undone or cause further damage in the wash.[2]
Use a mesh laundry bag. Put the toy inside a mesh laundry bag for an extra layer of protection. This will help prevent the toy from snagging or getting torn up in the wash. If you don’t have one handy, a pillowcase secured with safety pins will work. In case something does fall off, the pillowcase or mesh bag will catch it before it gets lost in the machine’s drain.[3][Edit]Using the Washing Machine
Presoak with a vinegar solution. Vinegar is a great natural fabric softener, and works great for common kid-related messes that might involve vomit or urine.[4] Mix one part clear vinegar with two parts warm water and dash of lemon juice or dish detergent.[5]
You can pour the diluted vinegar solution right into the laundry bag and let it soak before putting in the machine wash.
If anything is caked onto the stuffed toy, use a sponge liberally soaked in the solution to get any messy matter off before tossing it in the mesh bag.
Place the toy and detergent inside the washer. If you have a top-loader that doesn’t have a separate compartment for detergent, get the water running and put down detergent before you place the toy inside. It’s best to use a machine without an agitator. Never use a high-powered laundromat machine.[6]
Use a very small amount of mild detergent, such as Woolite, or just use the vinegar solution you made. If you go with detergent, a teaspoon or so will do, depending on the size of the stuffed animal.[7]
Soap nuts also have hypoallergenic properties, which are good if your child has a dust mite allergy.
Fabric softener is normally unnecessary and can harm the plush.
Set the washer on cold and use gentle cycle. The gentlest cycle possible will reduce the risk of parts torn off. Don’t use hot water, or you’ll discolor the stuffed animal. Hot water is especially harmful for any glued parts the toy might have.[8][Edit]Drying a Stuffed Toy
Reshape the stuffed animal. When you remove the toy from the mesh bag, you might find that the washing machine has left the stuffed toy lumpy or bumpy. Before letting it dry, check for any balled up batting. Gently work it out with your fingers and fluff while it’s still damp for best results.[9]
Hang dry. Most stuffed toys should be air dried. A dryer’s heat, even on low, can melt or damage any glue, plastic, or even the fabric of the stuffed toy. Lay it out on a dry towel, or use a clamp hanger or S-hooks to hang it. [10] If you have any concern about allergies, hang the stuffed animal inside so it won’t pick up any pollen or other allergens. Note well, however, that direct sunlight is an efficient dryer, and the sun’s ultraviolet light also has disinfectant properties.[11]
Primp and return to your child. Use a dental pick to pick out knots in the fur, or a fine comb to give it a little more fluff. If the toy isn’t too fragile, you could tumble it in the dryer with a few towels for ten minutes for added fluff and softness, but make sure it’s set to no heat. Double check to make sure everything is stitched, no threads need to be cut, and that the toy is in good shape, and return it clean and fresh to your youngster.[12]
[Edit]Tips
Lots of stuffed animals come with machine washing instructions. Read them before making final decisions.
Do your best to get the stuffed animal dry within a day to prevent mildew growth.
It’s best to wash the stuffed animal when it won’t be missed. If your child can’t fall asleep without it, don’t wash it during naptime.[Edit]Warnings
If washed too often, the toy can wear out its fabric.
Too much sun exposure will fade some stuffed animals.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
A dirty stuffed toy
Needle, thread, and thimble (optional)
Mesh laundry bag or pillowcase and safety pins
Gentle laundry detergent
A washing machine with cool and gentle cycles (not the laundromat!)
A drying towel or clamp hanger
A sunny windowsill or veranda
A dryer (optional)
Dental pick or fine comb[Edit]Related wikiHows
Wash Stuffed Animals
Take Care of Your Stuffed Animal
Care for a Teddy Bear[Edit]References↑ http://www.mamaslaundrytalk.com/how-to-wash-stuffed-animals/

↑ http://www.stain-removal-101.com/washing-stuffed-animals.html

↑ http://www.stain-removal-101.com/washing-stuffed-animals.html

↑ https://www.realskeptic.com/2009/07/26/vinegar-as-a-fabric-softener/

↑ http://www.howtocleanthings.com/stains/how-to-clean-vomit/

↑ http://www.mamaslaundrytalk.com/how-to-wash-stuffed-animals/

↑ http://www.stain-removal-101.com/washing-stuffed-animals.html

↑ http://www.mamaslaundrytalk.com/how-to-wash-stuffed-animals/

↑ http://www.stain-removal-101.com/washing-stuffed-animals.html

↑ http://www.mamaslaundrytalk.com/how-to-wash-stuffed-animals/

↑ http://www.home-ec101.com/sunlight-as-a-disinfectant-for-laundry/

↑ http://www.stain-removal-101.com/washing-stuffed-animals.html

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Today in History for 5th November 2019

Historical Events

1789 – French National Meeting declares all citizens equal under law
1912 – Bulgarian troops in Constantinople blockade drinking water
1953 – Film “How to Marry a Millionaire” directed by Jean Negulesco, starring Lauren Bacall, Betty Grable and Marilyn Monroe, first to be filmed in CinemaScope released
1976 – Pirates trade Manny Sanguillen and $100,000 to A’s for mgr Chuck Tanner
2013 – Bill de Blasio is elected New York City Mayor
2018 – Child suicide rate in Japan at 30-year high with 250 taking their lives 2016/17 according to Government Ministry

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1798 – Carolina F L duchess of Berry, daughter of crown prince of Naples
1905 – Joel McCrea, American actor (Foreign Correspondent, Sullivan’s Travels), born in South Pasadena, California (d. 1990)
1922 – Violet Barclay, American illustrator
1948 – Pepper LaBeija [William Jackson], American drag queen and fashion designer, born in The Bronx, New York (d. 2003)
1960 – Tilda Swinton, British actress (We Need to Talk About Kevin, The Chronicles of Narnia), born in London, England
1971 – Sergei Berezin, Russian NHL forward (Team Russia, Olympic silver 1998), born in Voskrensensk, Russia

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Famous Deaths

1869 – Otis Tufts, American machinist and inventor who built printing machines, steam engines, firefighting equipment and invented the steam pile driver, dies at 65
1879 – James Clerk Maxwell, Scottish physicist (speed of light), dies of abdominal cancer at 48
1960 – Johnny Horton, American country and rockabilly singer (The Battle of New Orleans), dies in a car accident at 33
1964 – Mabel Lucie Attwell, English children’s author and illustrator, dies at 85
1975 – Edward L Tatum, American molecular geneticist and biochemist (Nobel Prize 1958), dies of heart failure at 65
1995 – Laura Weber, TV Host, dies at 70

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How to Make Edible Teacups

Dainty teacups that you can actually eat make a wonderful addition to children’s birthday parties or afternoon teas. To use ice cream cones as the base for the teacups, cut them and attach the tops to shortbread cookies. Then use icing to fix pretzel handles in place. For teacups that mimic the actual shape of a teacup, roll gum paste to fit a real teacup and saucer. Then leave them to harden. You can even use melted chocolate to create perfectly rounded teacups that are great for your event.

[Edit]Ingredients
[Edit]Cone and Cookie Teacups
12 wafer ice cream cones
1 tube of ready-to-use icing
12 round shortbread cookies
6 round miniature chocolate-covered pretzelsMakes 12 teacups

[Edit]Gum Paste Teacup and Saucer
1 cup (226 g) of prepared gum paste
Powdered sugar for dusting
1 ounce (30 g) of white chocolate, melted, optionalMakes 1 teacup and saucer

[Edit]Chocolate Teacups
14 ounces (420 g) of white chocolate, temperedMakes 4 teacups and saucers

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Making Teacups with Cones and Cookies
Cut the base from each wafer cone. Get out 12 wafer ice cream cones and use a serrated knife to carefully cut just below the line where the base of the cone meets the rounded cup part of the cone. Do this for each cone and discard the longer base pieces.[1]
You should be left with 12 rounded cups that have holes in the bottom.
Use a gentle sawing motion as you cut so you don’t break the cones.
Squeeze icing along the base of each cup and press it onto a cookie. Take a tube of ready-to-use icing in any color and squirt it along the base of the wafer cone cup that you just cut. Then push it onto 1 round shortbread cookie to form the base of the teacup. Repeat this for each of the wafer cone cups.[2]If you don’t want to work with ready-to-use icing in a tube, make your own and pipe it onto the cones.
You can also dip the cones into chocolate, but be careful, as this method is imprecise.
Cut 6 chocolate-covered pretzels in half and attach them to the teacups. Use the serrated knife to cut each of the mini chocolate-covered pretzels in half. Squirt a dab of icing onto each end of a pretzel half and then push it onto the side of a teacup so it forms a handle. Hold it in place for a minute and then continue with the remaining pretzels and teacups.[3]Use plain, round pretzels if you don’t want the chocolate-covered kind.
Chill the teacups for 2 hours before using them. Put the assembled teacups into an airtight container and refrigerate them until the icing is completely hard. This will ensure that the teacups won’t break apart if you choose to fill them.Once the icing has set, you can store the teacups at room temperature until you’re ready to serve them.[Edit]Crafting a Teacup and Saucer with Gum Paste
Roll the gum paste into an circle. Put 1 cup (226 g) of prepared gum paste onto a rolling mat and use a fondant rolling pin to roll it into a thin circle. The circle needs to be slightly larger than your saucer.[4]If you don’t have a fondant rolling pin, use a standard rolling pin and dust it with powdered sugar to prevent the gum paste from sticking to it.
Press the gum paste onto a saucer and cut around the edge. Dust a little powdered sugar onto the saucer and then tap it out. Gently lay the rolled gum paste onto the saucer and press down firmly so the paste molds to the saucer. Then use a knife or blade tool to cut the excess gum paste from around the edge of the saucer. Set the excess aside and smooth the edges of the gum paste saucer.[5]If you want to include details on the edges of your saucer, press in the edges to create a slight scallop.
Roll gum paste to make a thin handle. Take some of the remaining gum paste and roll it into a log that’s as thin as you like. Bend the log into a question mark shape that will form the handle for your teacup. Set the handle aside along with the saucer to set while you work on the teacup’s base.[6]Your handle can be as simplistic or intricate as you like.
Form a circular base for the teacup. Cut another small rope that you can wrap into a circle. Squirt a few drops of edible glue onto 1 end of the rope and attach the other end so you have a ring. Then roll out more gum paste as thinly as you made the saucer and cut it into a circle that’s the same size as the base of the teacup. Squeeze edible glue onto it and stick it onto the ring you made.[7]Set this circular base aside while you make the teacup.
Purchase edible glue from craft supply stores or online.
Cut thinly rolled gum paste into a rainbow that fits inside the teacup. Use the fondant rolling pin to roll the leftover gum paste into an oval that’s as thin as the saucer you made. Then cut a large rainbow out and place it inside the teacup so the wider side faces the lip of the cup.You may need to trim or make adjustments to the shape of the gum paste so it covers the inside of the teacup. Keep in mind that there will be a small hole at the bottom of the cup.[8]
To ensure the rainbow is the right size before cutting the gum paste, cut out a paper template and nestle it into the teacup first.
Press the gum paste in place and let it set. Use your fingers to push the gum paste evenly into the teacup so there aren’t any gaps. Push the gum paste down to cover the hole at the bottom of the cup. Pay attention to joining the edges where the ends of the gum paste meet. Then set the teacup aside to set up overnight.[9]If there’s not enough gum paste to close the bottom of the teacup, cut a small circle of gum paste and push it into place.
Glue the pieces of the teacup together with edible glue and let them set. Once the teacup is hard, gently pull it out of the actual teacup. Then squirt a little edible glue onto the circular base you made and set the gum paste teacup on it. Take the handle and squeeze a little edible glue on it before you press it against the side of the teacup. Leave the teacup for a few hours so the glue hardens.[10]Since you won’t be gluing anything to the saucer, simply remove it from the actual saucer once the gum paste hardens.[Edit]Creating Chocolate Teacups
Put of chocolate into each cavity of a dome mold. Set a silicone dome mold on your work surface and scoop of tempered chocolate into each cavity.[11]For larger teacups, use a mold with 6 semi-sphere cavities. For standard-sized teacups, choose a mold with 12 to 15 dome cavities.
Spread the chocolate in the cavities and chill the mold for 15 minutes. Take a silicone brush or use the back of a spoon to spread the chocolate throughout the mold so each cavity is covered. Then put the mold in the refrigerator until the chocolate hardens.[12]If you used a mold with smaller domes, the chocolate will harden faster.
Peel the chocolate cups out of the mold. Remove the mold from the refrigerator and turn it upside-down on your work surface. Gently hold the mold in place with 1 hand and use your other hand to slowly peel the mold away. The chocolate cups should separate from the mold.[13]Set the cups aside while you make the chocolate saucers and handles.
Spoon 4 circles of chocolate onto parchment paper and pipe 4 handles. To make the saucers, lay a sheet of parchment paper onto a baking sheet and spread some of the remaining tempered chocolate into 4 even circles on the paper. Each circle should be about in diameter. Then pipe or spoon more chocolate onto the parchment paper to make 4 handle shapes.[14]Each saucer should be about thick.
If you don’t have parchment paper, use waxed paper instead.
Chill the saucers and handles for 10 minutes. Put the baking sheet into the refrigerator and leave the saucers and handles to set. Remove the baking sheet once the chocolate is completely hard. Carefully peel the chocolates off of the sheet so you can assemble the teacups.[15]
Attach the handles to the cups and set them on the saucers. To assemble the teacups, dip the ends of the handles into a little of the tempered chocolate. Hold the handles against the sides of the chocolate cups until they stay attached. Then set each teacup onto the chocolate saucers.[16]Work quickly so your hands don’t melt the chocolate. If the chocolate teacup pieces begin to soften, put them into the refrigerator for a few minutes.[Edit]Tips
If any of the handles or cookies come a little loose, simply add more frosting to attach them again.
Fill your edible teacups with ice cream, frozen yogurt, candy, or fresh fruit just before serving.
To decorate the gum paste teacups, make edible food paint and paint floral designs on the cup.[17][Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Cone and Cookie Teacups
Serrated knife
Cutting board[Edit]Gum Paste Teacup and Saucer
Rolling mat
Teacup and saucer
Fondant rolling pin
Knife or blade tool
Edible Glue[Edit]Chocolate Teacups
Silicone dome mold
Spoon
Parchment paper
Spoon
Pastry brush
Baking sheet[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://youtu.be/JcBCL9b4rPs?t=10

↑ https://family.disney.com/recipe/edible-teacups/

↑ https://youtu.be/JcBCL9b4rPs?t=78

↑ https://www.howtocakethat.com/how-to-make-an-edible-teacup.html

↑ https://youtu.be/zmfM19dOAYI?t=39

↑ http://www.junipercakery.co.uk/blog/tutorial-edible-teacu/

↑ http://www.junipercakery.co.uk/blog/tutorial-edible-teacu/

↑ http://www.junipercakery.co.uk/blog/tutorial-edible-teacu/

↑ http://www.junipercakery.co.uk/blog/tutorial-edible-teacu/

↑ http://www.junipercakery.co.uk/blog/tutorial-edible-teacu/

↑ https://lexiscleankitchen.com/chocolate-dessert-cups/

↑ https://hungryhappenings.com/sprinkle-coated-white-chocolate-bowls-valentines-day/

↑ https://hungryhappenings.com/sprinkle-coated-white-chocolate-bowls-valentines-day/

↑ https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/chocolate-tea-cup-and-saucer-recipe-2047094

↑ https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/chocolate-tea-cup-and-saucer-recipe-2047094

↑ https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/chocolate-tea-cup-and-saucer-recipe-2047094

↑ https://asideofsweet.com/how-make-edible-food-paint/

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