How to Calculate Fuel Consumption

With the price of fuels going up all the time, more and more drivers are aware of how much fuel their car needs. While the exact fuel consumption of your car changes based on your circumstances (city or highway, road conditions, tire pressure, etc.), finding out your car’s fuel consumption is actually very easy.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Finding Fuel Consumption
Know that the equation for fuel consumption is “Miles Driven divided by Amount of Gas Used.” A car’s fuel consumption is a measure of miles driven per gallon of gas. If you know the distance you drove and how many gallons fit in your tank, you can simply divide the miles by the gas to get your “miles per gallon,” or mpg.
You can perform the same calculation with kilometers and liters as well.
The best time to record is right after you fill your car with gas.
Reset the “trip odometer” after you fill up your tank. Newer cars have a trip odometer that you can set to zero at any time. It is usually on the dashboard or center console, with a small button you can hold to reset it to zero. Set it to zero when you fill up the car and check it when you need to fill up again — this is your mileage since you last bought gas.
Your trip odometer will say “0 miles.”
If you don’t have a trip odometer, record the number of miles on your car as “Starting Mileage.” For example, if your car has 10,000 miles on it when you fill your tank, write “10,000.”
Record the miles on the trip odometer right before you buy more gas. Before you start filling up your car at the gas station, record the mileage on the odometer as “Final Mileage.”
If you do not have a trip odometer, subtract your “Starting Mileage” from your current mileage to find out how far your traveled. If your odometer now says 10,250 for example, subtract 10,000. You drove 250 miles on that tank of gas.
Drive your car until the tank is almost empty. You can perform this calculation no matter how much gas is left in the tank, but the more gas you use the more accurate your reading will be.
Record the amount of gas you buy in gallons. Refill your tank completely and note how many gallons/liters you needed to fill the tank back up. This is you “Fuel Usage.”
You must refill your tank completely for this to work, otherwise you don’t know how much gas your car used since your last tank.
Divide mileage by fuel usage to see your car’s fuel consumption. This tells you how many miles you drove per gallon of gas. For example, if you drove 335 miles before refueling, and you filled your car up with 12 gallons of gas, your fuel consumption was 27.9 miles per gallon, or mpg (335 miles / 12 gallon = 27.9 mpg).
If you measured in kilometers and liters, you should instead divide fuel used by kilometers traveled and multiply the result by 100 to get “liters per 100 kilometers”.
You have to start from a full tank and return to a full tank to know exactly how much gas your car consumed.
Practice calculating with an example. Terry’s odometer reads 23,500 with a full tank. After driving for a few days he needs to buy gas. The odometer reads 23,889, and it takes 12.5 gallons to refill his tank. What was his fuel consumption?
Fuel Consumption = (Final Mileage – Starting Mileage) / Fuel Usage
Fuel Consumption = (23,889mi – 23,500mi) / 12.5 gallons
Fuel Consumption = 389mi / 12.5 gallons
Fuel Consumption = 31.1 mpg[Edit]Finding Average Fuel Consumption
Remember that fuel consumption changes based on your driving. For example, stopping and starting the car a lot uses much more gas than driving at a constant pace. This is why highway consumption is always less than city consumption.
Cruise control can help you get better fuel consumption.
Fuel consumption gets worse the faster you drive.
Since AC uses gasoline, using it will diminish your fuel consumption.[1]
Record multiple tanks of gas in a row to find your average fuel consumption. To get a more accurate picture of your car’s fuel consumption, you need to have more data. By driving for longer and averaging your fuel consumption you eliminate “glitches” in your data.
Say, for example, that you calculated your fuel consumption one day as you drove up into the mountains. Because climbing uphill takes more fuel, your fuel consumption would look much lower than it normally is.
Set your trip odometer to zero with a full tank of gas. Set your odometer to zero and don’t reset it after you get a tank of gas. If you don’t have an odometer, record how many miles are on your car with a full tank of gas.
Record how many gallons of gas you purchase each time you fill up. To get a more accurate measure of fuel consumption, you need to know how much gas you are using. Each time you fill up, write down the number of gallons you purchase and save it.
Drive for normally for several weeks. Do not reset your trip odometer as you drive. Make sure your fill up your car 3-4 times for an accurate reading. Try to do this during a month of average driving, as big trips or unexpected traffic will change your fuel consumption.
You do not need to fill your car all the way up each time. As long as you record the number of gallons you put in you can calculate fuel consumption.
Fill up your tank fully after 2-3 weeks. When you are ready to calculate your fuel consumption, top your car off and record the number of gallons you put in.
Add up the number of gallons you bought. This represents the total gas used over this period of time.
If I bought three tanks of gas, 12 gallons, 3 gallons, and 10 gallons, then my total gas usage would be 25 gallons.
Divide total miles by total gallons. Use your trip odometer to see how many miles you traveled total, then divide this by gallons to get your average fuel consumption. While this is the exact number of miles per gallon during your test period, it is a good estimate for your car’s average fuel consumption.
For example, if you used 25 gallons of gas, and drove 500 miles during that time, then your average fuel consumption would be 20 miles per gallon (500 miles / 25 gallons = 20 mpg).
Know that your car’s advertised mileage is often overestimated. By law, car makers must post the average fuel consumption for cars. However, these are only estimates, and they are frequently on the high end.[2] You can look up your car’s fuel consumption online through this US Department of Energy website, but to find your car’s actual miles per gallon you’ll have to calculate it yourself.
If your calculation is drastically different from the suggest average, you may need to bring your car to a mechanic.[Edit]Minimizing Fuel Consumption
Avoid using the air conditioner. The AC uses gasoline to cool your car, which means you have less gasoline to actually drive with. Turn down the AC or turn it off once the car is cool to make your car more efficient.
Running AC on max can decrease your fuel economy by almost 25%.[3]
Drive at the speed limit. The faster you drive your car the more fuel you will consume. This is not a small change, either — every 5 miles per hour your drive over 50mph is the equivalent of paying $0.19 more for each gallon of gas.[4]
Drive defensively. It takes more energy to start moving a car then to keep it moving. That means if you are constantly tailgating people, stopping and starting, or trying to pass, you’re using far more fuel than if you were keeping an even pace.
Try not to brake or accelerate harshly. Brake early instead of slamming on the pedal.[5]
Use cruise-control for long, flat stretches. Cruise control will keep your car at a consistent and even speed, which avoids burning up fuel unnecessarily with small accelerations and stops.[6]
Turn off your car in traffic. Idling, or leaving your car on when it isn’t moving, wastes gas without moving you anywhere. When possible, cut the engine to save on precious gasoline.[7]
Avoid rooftop cargo carriers. These greatly diminish your cars aerodynamics, slowing your car down and causing you to use more fuel. In general, towing trailers or loading up the trunk is a more fuel efficient option.
Keep your tires well-inflated. Under-inflated tires can lower gas mileage by 0.3% if all four tires are low. Using the free air pump at most gas stations, inflate the tires up to the PSI recommended in your owner’s manual.[8]
Some cars list the proper tire pressure on a sticker in the driver’s side door or the glove compartment.
Replace your air filter. This is one of the cheapest and easiest ways to bump up your fuel efficiency. Make sure you buy the right filter for your car by bringing the make, model, and year in to your local auto shop and asking for recommendations–every car needs a different filter.
For newer cars, replacing the air filter will not help fuel efficiency very much. It will, however, make it easier for your car to accelerate without issues.[9][Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
Observe the posted speed limit.
Don’t speed up and slow down irregularly, it wastes fuel, especially in big SUV/Sedan type vehicles.
There’s usually no point in turning off your car at stoplights, since you usually only need to wait no more than 2 minutes if there’s not much traffic. Only turn off your car if you’re absolutely certain that it’s better to turn it off (e.g. waiting to pick up someone at the airport).[Edit]Related wikiHows
Calculate Your Car’s Fuel Efficiency (MPG)
Keep Track of Fuel Use
Improve Your Gas Mileage and Save Money[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/drive.shtml

↑ http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/magazine/2013/08/the-mpg-gap/index.htm

↑ http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/factors.shtml

↑ http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/driveHabits.jsp

↑ http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2012/01/how-to-save-money-on-gas/index.htm

↑ http://www.lifehacker.co.uk/2014/06/26/hypermile-driving-secrets-max-petrol-mileage

↑ http://www.lifehacker.co.uk/2014/06/26/hypermile-driving-secrets-max-petrol-mileage

↑ http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/maintain.jsp

↑ http://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/maintain.jsp

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Today in History for 7th November 2019

Historical Events

1916 – Amidst the Mexican Revolution and World War I, Woodrow Wilson is re-elected as President of the United States, defeating Republican candidate Charles E. Hughes
1917 – The Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic is proclaimed; first Council of People’s Commissars is formed with Vladimir Lenin as leader and including Leon Trotsky and Joseph Stalin
1921 – Hungary passes a law invalidating the Habsburg line of succession to the throne
1950 – French women and children leaves Hanoi/Tonkin-delta
1998 – 10th College Football Holy War: Notre Dame beats Boston College 31-26 in Chestnut Hill
2012 – Voters in Maine, Maryland and Washington approve measures for same-sex marriage

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1936 – Barry Newman, American actor (Amy, Deadline, Petrocelli), born in Boston, Massachusetts
1938 – Jim Katt, American baseball pitcher and sportscaster (NY Yankees, Minnesota Twins), born in Zeeland, Michigan
1943 – Wensley Haydon-Baillie, English pharmaceutical manufacturer
1943 – Boris Gromov, Russian general and politician (Governor of Moscow Oblast 2000-12), born in Saratov, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union
1948 – Alex Ribeiro, Brazilian racing driver, born in Belo Horizonte, Brazil
1968 – Mark Preston, Australian businessman and motorsport professional, born in Geelong, Victoria, Australia

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1678 – Erasmus Quellinus II [Quellien], Flemish painter/etcher, dies at 70
1857 – Charles Zeuner, German-American composer and organist, dies at 62
1959 – Victor McLaglen, actor (Gunga Din), dies of heart attack at 72
1986 – Tracy Pew, Australian musician (The Birthday Party) (b. 1957)
1991 – Tom of Finland [Touko Laaksonen], Finnish fetish artist, dies at 71
2006 – Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber, French journalist (b. 1924)

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Make Nachos

There aren’t enough good things to say about nachos. In their classic form, they’re spicy, creamy, cheesy, crunchy, zesty and delicious, but what makes them timeless is their versatility. Take the core taste concepts – creamy, crunchy, layers – and you can let your culinary creativity shine. This article gives instructions for making classic nachos, BBQ nachos, and dessert nachos.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Classic Nachos
Gather your ingredients. Classic nachos highlight the two most essential nachos ingredients: chips and cheese. Build on this foundation by adding whatever toppings you desire. Pick up the following items:
Tortilla Chips: flour or corn, the fresher the better. The perfect chip is thick enough to hold serious toppings but light enough to let the other ingredients shine.
Cheese: cheddar is the classic, but mozzarella, monterey jack, cotija; if it can shred, it’ll taste good. Mix them for color.
Salsa: your choice. The classic is chunky pico de gallo.
Sour cream: Try not to choose low fat. Sour cream gives Nachos part of their umami and balances the spice.
Pickled jalapeños: available in most supermarkets. Leave these out if you can’t handle the spice.
Beans: black beans or refried beans are the most popular choices. This optional ingredient adds some heft to your nachos.
Meat: seasoned ground beef or shredded chicken. Adding some well-cooked and seasoned meat, while optional, can make your nachos much more satisfying.
Place a mound of chips on a baking sheet. You can also use a pie dish or a casserole dish for this purpose. If you’re microwaving the nachos instead of heating them up in the oven, use a microwave-safe dish.[1]
Add the cheese. Sprinkle a liberal amount of cheese over the nachos. Try to get some cheese on every chip.
Cook the nachos. Nachos taste just as good whether they’re cooked in the oven or the microwave. Choose one of these cooking methods:
Broil them. Set the oven rack from the heat source and broil until the cheese melts. This will usually happen in 5 minutes. Be careful not to burn the cheese. Remove and let cool for a few minutes.
Microwave them. Microwave on high for 2 minutes. Remove and let cool for a few minutes.
Dress the nachos. Place dollops of sour cream in a ring around the top of the nachos. Sprinkle the jalapeños and salsa on top.
Serve and enjoy. Napkins are a must; forks are scandalous. Select a nacho, dip it in some sour cream, use it to scoop a jalapeño, and eat up.
Classic nachos taste great with the addition of any of your favorite meats or vegetables. Favorites include ground beef, grilled steak or chicken, sliced sauteed mushrooms, raw minced onion, black olives, and shredded lettuce.[2]
Individual portions can be served on small plates or in bowls; just divide the chips and melted cheese up before adding other toppings.[Edit]BBQ Nachos
Gather your ingredients. BBQ nachos are the potato-based alternative to classic nachos. You use potato chips and pair them with delicious BBQ meat. Go to the grocery store and get these ingredients:
Potato chips: get either flavored or plain, ruffled or smooth.
Cheese: choose pepperjack, cheddar or both, shredded.
Salsa: pico de gallo is the clear winner for this dish, as anything saucier will compete with the BBQ.
Sour cream: you can skip this if you want, but it’s surprisingly delicious with BBQ sauce.
BBQ: pulled pork is available at any BBQ joint and most grocery stores. Make sure to get the sauce, too.
BBQ chicken is also delicious, but never serve anything with bones.
Vegetarian chili or baked beans are also great substitutes for meat.
Put the potato chips on a cooking sheet. Choose a cooking dish based on your heat source, either oven broiler safe or microwavable. Build a mound of chips that covers the bottom of the pan.
Sprinkle on the cheese. Try to get an equal amount of cheese on all of the chips.
Cook the nachos. If you’re broiling, set the oven rack from the heat source and broil until the cheese melts. This will usually happen in 5 minutes. Be careful not to burn the cheese. If you’re microwaving, microwave on high for 2 minutes. Let the nachos cool for a few minutes when they’re done cooking.
Dress the nachos. Place dollops of sour cream and salsa on top of the nachos. Pile the BBQ in the middle. Sprinkle other toppings and condiments around the sides.
Serve and enjoy. Since these nachos are served with meat, you may want to offer your dinner guests a fork this time. Dish the nachos onto plates and serve with extra toppings on the side.[Edit]Dessert Nachos
Gather your ingredients. These dessert nachos are a delicious way to end a Mexican-themed meal. The flavors of cinnamon and sugar bring out the best in flour tortilla chips. Pick up these ingredients in preparation:
Flour tortilla chips. The fresher the better, light and crispy. Try to find unsalted chips, though the contrast of sweet and salty can be nice.[3]
2 tablespoons white sugar
¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 cup butter, melted
Chocolate syrup
Caramel syrup
Whipped cream
Melt the butter. Place a small saucepan on the stove and put the butter in the pan. Turn the burner to medium high and let the butter melt completely. You can also opt to just place the butter in the microwave.
Coat the chips with butter. Place the chips on a baking sheet. Drizzle the butter over the chips, doing your best to distribute it evenly. Use tongs to gently toss the chips so they get evenly coated in butter.
Add the cinnamon and sugar. Mix the cinnamon and sugar together in a small bowl, then sprinkle the mixture over the chips. Use the tongs to toss the chips to ensure they all get a coating of sugar and spice.
Bake the chips. Place the baking sheet in the oven and bake the chips for about 15 minutes, or until they turn golden brown and crispy.
Dress the nachos. Drizzle chocolate syrup and caramel sauce over the chips. Place a dollop of whipped cream in the center of the platter.
Serve the dessert nachos. Put the baked chips on a large platter. Invite your guests to dig in.
You can also dish out the nachos onto individual serving plates.
This dish is delicious with ice cream, especially chocolate or vanilla flavors.[Edit]Tips
You can use an oven toaster or an oven for baking the nachos. If you use an oven, be sure to preheat it before you assemble your nachos.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Eat Nachos
Make Gourmet Nachos[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Nuked-Nachos-232716

↑ http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/rachael-ray/super-nachos-recipe/index.html

↑ http://allrecipes.com/recipe/chocolate-allspice-dessert-nachos/

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