How to Spread Kindness

Spreading kindness is beneficial for you and the recipients of your kindness. The happiness we feel from giving and receiving kindness promotes general good health. You can spread kindness in many ways, such as by being friendly and generous, and infusing the world and your community with positivity over the holidays and every day. Giving produces a “ripple” or “domino” effect, which can grow into an entire network of positivity. Although it’s helpful when you donate financially or with things like food and clothing, there are also ways you can spread kindness without spending a penny. Offering to babysit or pet sit, giving compliments, and simply minding your manners are just a few ways you can help to make kindness contagious.[1]
[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Behaving Kindly and Positively in Your Everyday Life
Smile. Look people in the eyes when you give them a grin. This is such a simple way to spread kindness, and it’s free! Be generous with your smile and put feeling into it. Smile at store clerks, waiters and baristas, mail carriers, and other people you come in contact with. This easy gesture can brighten people’s day.
Mind your manners. Good manners are the art of making people feel at ease.[2] Treat others respectfully, as well or even better than you’d wish to be treated. Aim to be cooperative and thoughtful.[3]
If you borrow things, don’t forget to give them back.[4]
Try to extend invitations to people who have previously invited you to an event.
Work on your interpersonal skills. For example, think of the nonverbal communication you may be sending with your body language. Interact with people using open and relaxed body language.
Encourage children. One of the best ways to spread kindness is by starting at home. If you have children, instill in them the importance of being kind to all beings. Read and tell them stories about kindness. Teach them forgiveness and gratitude as well as respect for all others, regardless of race, gender, origin, culture or socio-economic status.[5]
Discuss your acts of kindness as a family at dinner.[6]
Be compassionate. Be an active listener without judging. Sometimes advice isn’t needed, and others just want to be heard. In order to develop better compassion for others, you should practice self-compassion as well by soothing yourself when you need it. When someone lets you down, remind yourself that people struggle silently for many reasons. Don’t be quick to anger or hold a grudge.[7]
The other person may be going through something you don’t know about that caused them to be tardy for a meeting, be snappy, or otherwise offend you.[8] Keep in mind that we all make mistakes; there could be any number of reasons for the person’s lack of acceptable behavior.
Tell yourself at the start of each day that you won’t judge anyone.[9]
Give people your full attention. Don’t interrupt, act condescending, fiddle with your phone or be otherwise rude.
For example, you can practice self-compassion by breathing deeply and releasing the tension in your muscles. Hold your hand over your heart. Focus on your breathing and imagine that you’re using it to send warm compassion throughout your body. Think of a positive self-affirmation, such as “Kindness is a strength. You are kind and capable.”
Express gratitude. Tip generously when you can.[10] Tell your loved ones why you’re grateful for them. Be appreciative and express your respect and admiration for others.[11]
Try telling someone in your life, “You inspire me to be a better person through your…” List specific things you appreciate about that person. If you don’t feel comfortable saying it in person, tell them through a note or online message.
Give compliments. When you think something nice about someone else, don’t keep it to yourself – say it! You can also do this online by “liking” people’s posts and tweeting good words to people.[12]
For instance, like ten things on someone’s Facebook profile or Instagram feed. Repeat the favor for others, for example, by making a habit of doing this every Sunday.
Try saying, “What a nice outfit!”
Refrain from negativity. Be mindful of not only your words, but also your thoughts. Thinking positively can help you approach the world with kindness. Start a day at a time, trying not to speak negatively. You may slip up, but stick with it until it becomes second nature for you to avoid negative words and deflect negative thoughts.[13]
Drive courteously. Put safety first, and then consider being a polite driver. Use your turn signals when you’re supposed to, and use your horn sparingly – only when you need to alert someone to your presence. Keep distance between your car and the one in front of you. Try not to block other people’s access while you’re sitting in traffic. Don’t try to cut off a line of cars by using the breakdown lane or a turning lane to skip ahead in traffic.[14]
Avoid blocking driveways, intersections, entrances and exits while traffic is stalled. Don’t block the passing lane for an unreasonable amount of time.
Road rage is illegal, dangerous, and spreads negative emotions like stress and anger. The DMV suggests that if you find yourself having a strong emotional reaction, breathe deeply, pull over, put some calming music on, and remind yourself that you have complete control over your own intentions.[15]
Be a kind shopper. Open and hold doors for people. Use shopping carts courteously. Always keep your cart to the side of the aisle so that people can get around you without having to wait for you to move. Offer your help if you see someone with their hands full, for instance an elderly person with a lot of items to load in their vehicle. If you see someone else vying for the same parking space, let them have it. Planning a little extra time can make it less stressful when you have to search for a parking spot or wait in store lines.[16]
If you are walking towards a store and see someone looking for a shopping cart corral, offer to walk the cart back into the store. You can use the cart yourself and they don’t have to find a cart return.
If you want to use your phone, try text messaging instead of talking so that you don’t bother others around you. If you encounter rudeness, match it with kindness and patience.[17]
Use pleasantries like “please,” “thank you,” and “you’re welcome.” Don’t get angry with salesclerks if an advertised product is out of stock. If you need to discuss it with an employee, ask for a manager, and present your problem clearly and calmly.
Don’t forget to exercise caution. If you’re in an isolated area like a parking lot empty of people, or if something feels off, don’t approach a stranger even if they’re crying for help. Go to a populated area and relay that the person needs help if they appear to be injured.
Forgive people. You can give kindness an edge over negativity by refusing to hold onto anger and resentment. Forgiveness is something you should do for your own well-being, and you can lead others by example through living a more positive life. You can tell the other person that you’ve forgiven them, or just say the words “I forgive you” aloud to yourself along with the reasons why you’re forgiving that person. You may be surprised at how freeing it feels![18]
Forgiving someone doesn’t mean you’re excusing their actions or that you’re forgetting the incident ever happened. It doesn’t make you a pushover; it means you’re exercising control over keeping negativity out of your life.
If someone is indebted to you, consider forgiving their debt, if possible.
If someone witnesses you letting a grievance go and expresses surprise about it, try saying, “I’ve decided to be a forgiver. You wouldn’t believe how much more peaceful my life has become because of it!”
Post something inspirational on social media. You never know when someone may need a pick-me-up and your simple gesture can reach them. Choose an uplifting quote or verse.[19] You can put it directly on your timeline on a site like Twitter, Facebook or Instagram. Or, if you notice someone who seems down, send them the post directly along with an inspirational message.[20]
Try saying something encouraging and nonjudgmental, like “I saw this verse and thought of you and your strength in dealing with difficulty.”[Edit]Spreading Kindness by Volunteering Your Time
Give free advice about something you’re good at. Think about what your skills are, whether they are work-related or hobby-based. If you know someone who could use the advice, seek them out. Otherwise, provide your advice on wikiHow and/or an online forum.
Search for online forums where the topic you’re an expert at is being discussed. You can contribute advice to the forum anonymously if desired.
Babysit or pet sit. If you know someone who could use a babysitter or pet sitter, offer your services. For example, to a friend, neighbor or family member. You can also offer to walk someone’s dog.
Try saying, “If you ever need a babysitter, I’m happy to help free of charge!”
Clear someone’s driveway. If you live in an area that gets snow, the next time you are out shoveling or snowboarding, consider doing one or more of your neighbor’s driveways as well. Try to clear the paths to their doors and their sidewalks also. Or, load your gear in the car and drive to a friend or family member’s house and clear their driveway for them.
Volunteer for a nonprofit. Find a charity that means a lot to you and donate your time by volunteering. Look on their website for information about volunteering, or email them to ask how you might be able to help.
If you don’t have time to volunteer, consider making a financial donation instead. You may be able to deduct it on your income taxes! There are also sites you can do your ordinary shopping through, such as Amazon Smile, who will donate a portion of your purchase to the charity of your choice.[21]
If you’re struggling with which charity to give to, ask yourself some questions. What values are important to you? What are you truly passionate about? Are there any particular current issues that matter to you the most? Do you envision a local or global impact from your contribution?[22]
Volunteer your professional services pro bono. Visit https://www.taprootplus.org/ to offer your help.
Share a charity on social media by posting a link to their information and/or a news article on how they’re helping to spread kindness.[23]
Volunteer to help feed the needy. Sign up to volunteer at a soup kitchen, local church or a campaign like Meal on Wheels. Locate soup kitchens near you by going to a search engine and typing in “find a soup kitchen.” You should get a list back of local results. Alternately, visit HomelessShelterDirectory.org. Call or visit the soup kitchen’s website to get more details about volunteering.
The Meals on Wheels program relies on volunteers to deliver meals to elderly people who are homebound or otherwise can’t prepare their own meals. You can learn more at http://www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org/take-action/volunteer.
Tutor students. Offer your services to help young people with reading. Look for local literacy volunteer organizations by visiting a search engine and entering the name of your state with the words “Literacy Volunteers.” If you’re interested in tutoring in another subject, try searching for that subject under your state on a site like volunteermatch.org.[24]
[Edit]Spreading Kindness by Donating and Gifting
Pay someone’s tab. When you go to a drive-thru for coffee or food and there’s someone in line behind you, tell the cashier you’d like to pay for their order. Alternately, you can do this inside of a restaurant or coffee shop on your way out. The object is to do this discreetly and anonymously, without receiving accolades.
Try saying, “I’d like to pay for the person behind me. Could you add it to my bill?” You could also request that the cashier relays a message, such as, “Please pay it forward someday!”
If you’re uneasy about how much the bill might be, contribute a specific amount instead. For instance, try saying, “Here is ten dollars towards the bill of the person behind me.” If the cashier mentions there will be change, tell them to keep it in their tip jar, if they have one, or ask them to give it back to person behind you.
Invite others over for a meal. Call friends, neighbors or family over to visit. You can mention whether the invitation is for brunch, lunch, dinner or tea/coffee. You can be extra kind by telling them they don’t need to bring anything but themselves.[25]
Put free stuff in the classifieds. You can do this on a website such as Craigslist (their “free” category is under the “for sale” section). Items you may want to consider giving away are vast, ranging from furniture and household items to tickets, toys, games and auto parts. When you don’t need something any more and/or you’re considering throwing it away (for example, on your trash bulk pickup date), consider whether you can give it away instead.
Remember to take safety precautions when meeting with strangers from the classifieds. You can read more about that at https://www.craigslist.org/about/safety
Donate food to the hungry. Donate canned food or other acceptable items to a food bank. You can organize a drive by getting friends and family together and asking them to bring items.[26]
Find food banks near you at http://www.FeedingAmerica.org or http://www.FoodPantries.org.
Give away used clothing and shoes. Find a local church, Goodwill or other nonprofit. Another way to do this is look online for a drop-off box near you that accepts such items.
Send holiday cards or treats. Purchase holiday cards at a supermarket or stationary store and send some delightful snail mail to your loved ones. Another idea for spreading kindness over the holidays is delivering treats through a service or in person.
There are many companies that offer mail order gifts of edible items such as Christmas cookies, nuts and other goodies. Consider ordering a box to arrive as a surprise for some of the people you know. Alternately, you can show up on their doorstep when you know they’ll be home, with your family and a box of homemade sweets. Ring the doorbell, and when they answer, sing one or two of your favorite carols!
Leave anonymous gifts in public areas. You can improvise with your own ideas of anonymous gifts, but a couple ideas to consider are stamps or books. Consider carrying a pack of sticky notes and a pen with you for the purpose of acts of kindness.
Occasionally when you go to the post office to buy stamps, purchase extra and leave them in or beside the machine.[27]
Take a good book you’re willing to part with and leave it in a public place with a note for someone else to enjoy it.[28]
Write something like, “This is for you. Please take it and try to pass on act of kindness to someone else.”
Bring flowers to a nursing home. A good way to do this is to buy or make two to four bouquets (or more). Select a nursing home from a local directory, like the yellow pages. When you arrive at the nursing home, find a staff member. Give one bouquet of flowers to them to keep, and ask them to give the other bouquets to residents who could use cheering up. This technique utilizes the rule of reciprocity, also called, “the norm of reciprocity.”[29]
If the staff member asks why you’ve given them flowers, just say, “It’s a ‘thank you’ for passing these out.” If you prefer not to do this in person, you can have a flower delivery company send bouquets with a similar note.
The rule of reciprocity means that the person you are generous to is likely to feel obliged to do you a favor in return. In this case, since you’re giving a bouquet to a staff member as well, you increase the likelihood that they will pass the kindness on well, by thinking carefully about which residents would most benefit from the gift.
Alternately, you can bring other types of gifts besides flowers, such as homemade knitted scarves.
Drop off items at a children’s hospital. Find a local children’s hospital in a directory. Call ahead first or visit the hospital’s website to find out where you should bring the gifts and if there are any guidelines about what you can give. Prepare some items you think kids would enjoy, such as kids’ craft sets, stuffed animals, or quilts.[30]
Set up a free coffee or hot cocoa stand. This is a great activity you can do with kids. Set it up as you might a lemonade stand, with a table, chairs, and a large sign. You can opt to serve coffee, hot chocolate, or both.[31]
Make sure to dress appropriately for the weather. This is a nice way to spread kindness over the holidays!
Write on the sign, “FREE Coffee and Hot Cocoa!” Consider adding to the sign or somewhere at your table an advisory such as: “Warning: beverages may be very hot.”
Items you may need are thermoses, coffee and/or hot chocolate, disposable coffee cups with lids, marshmallows, packs of sugar or artificial sweetener, packs of flavored or unflavored creamers, and stirrers.[Edit]Tips
Seek out neighbors you haven’t met yet. Introduce yourself and convey that it’s a pleasure to meet them. Not only is this kind and polite, but you never know when you may need a neighbor’s help in the future!
When shopping, leave children at home if possible. If that’s not possible, ensure they are fed and well-rested, and be prepared to leave as soon as you sense any meltdown coming on.[32]
Set reminders on your calendar to celebrate kindness holidays. National Random Acts of Kindness Day is February 17th. Random Acts of Kindness Week is February 14th through the 20th. World Kindness Day is observed internationally on the 13th of November each year. Giving Tuesday is recognized on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving.
Use kindness to celebrate National Bullying Prevention Month. National Bullying Prevention Month occurs in October of every year. Anti-bullying is reactive, whereas being kind is proactive. You can help spread kindness by enriching this occasion with goodness rather than defensiveness.[33][Edit]Warnings
Don’t weed or prune someone else’s garden without permission. This tip circulates online as an “act of kindness” but is not advisable, as it can have the opposite effect. Even though your intentions are good, you can end up causing unintentional upset. Some weeds are beneficial and grown intentionally. As far as pruning, certain plants do better with their blooms and seed heads intact rather than pinched back (or the grower may simply prefer them the way they are).
Try not to overstep in your quest to be kind. For instance, don’t discount someone else’s personal beliefs or assume that you know their feelings or preferences. Keep in mind that different people have different boundaries.[34][Edit]References↑ http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/5_ways_giving_is_good_for_you

↑ http://www.bartleby.com/27/9.html

↑ http://www.mtstcil.org/skills/manners-6.html

↑ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationopinion/11633918/Whatever-happened-to-basic-good-manners.html

↑ http://www.actionforhappiness.org/kindness-project-in-schools

↑ http://www.virtuesforlife.com/100-ways-to-be-kinder/

↑ http://www.chopra.com/articles/compassion-in-action-15-easy-ways-to-spread-kindness

↑ http://www.rd.com/advice/relationships/how-to-be-polite/

↑ http://notesonbliss.com/ways-to-spread-kindness/

↑ http://www.virtuesforlife.com/100-ways-to-be-kinder/

↑ http://www.citybyheart.com/2014/12/24/3-powerful-random-acts-of-kindness-for-the-holidays/

↑ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/galit-breen/62-ways-to-spread-kindness-like-wildfire_b_8276682.html

↑ http://www.chopra.com/articles/compassion-in-action-15-easy-ways-to-spread-kindness

↑ http://emilypost.com/advice/important-manners-for-driving/

↑ http://www.dmv.org/how-to-guides/driving-and-emotions.php

↑ http://www.chopra.com/articles/compassion-in-action-15-easy-ways-to-spread-kindness

↑ http://emilypost.com/advice/ten-tips-for-holiday-shopping/

↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mindful-anger/201409/how-do-you-forgive-even-when-it-feels-impossible-part-1

↑ http://inspiration.allwomenstalk.com/ways-to-use-social-media-to-spread-kindness

↑ http://www.spreadkindness.org/kindness-ideas

↑ http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/gossip/kindness-article-1.2893738

↑ http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2016/11/27/give-giving-tuesday-charity-thanksgiving/94089970/

↑ http://inspiration.allwomenstalk.com/ways-to-use-social-media-to-spread-kindness

↑ http://www.virtuesforlife.com/100-ways-to-be-kinder/

↑ http://notesonbliss.com/ways-to-spread-kindness/

↑ http://www.actionforhappiness.org/kindness-project-in-schools

↑ http://www.spreadkindness.org/kindness-ideas

↑ http://www.actionforhappiness.org/kindness-project-in-schools

↑ https://www.verywell.com/what-is-the-rule-of-reciprocity-2795891

↑ http://www.virtuesforlife.com/100-ways-to-be-kinder/

↑ http://www.actionforhappiness.org/kindness-project-in-schools

↑ http://www.virtuesforlife.com/100-ways-to-be-kinder/

↑ http://www.huffingtonpost.com/galit-breen/62-ways-to-spread-kindness-like-wildfire_b_8276682.html

↑ http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2014/11/05/how-to-respect-other-peoples-boundaries/

Read More

Today in History for 13th November 2019

Historical Events

1854 – “New Era” sinks off New Jersey coast with loss of 300
1909 – 259 miners die in a fire at St Paul Mine at Cherry, Illinois
1916 – Prime Minister of Australia Billy Hughes is expelled from the Labor Party over his support for conscription
1965 – “Yarmouth Castle” burns and sinks off Bahamas, killing 89
1995 – “GoldenEye”, 17th James Bond film, starring Pierce Brosnan for the first time and Judi Dench as M, released
2000 – The Beatles release their compilation album “1” (2001 Billboard Album of the Year)

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1792 – Edward John Trelawny, English traveler and author (Adv of Younger Son), born in London (d. 1881)
1804 – Theophilus Hunter Holmes, Lieutenant General (Confederate Army), born in Sampson County, North Carolina (d. 1880)
1935 – George Carey, Archbishop of Canterbury, born in The East End, Co. London
1952 – Art Malik, Pakistani-born English actor
1967 – Jimmy Kimmel, American TV host and producer (Jimmy Kimmel Live!), born in Brooklyn, New York
1971 – John Francis Zingg, rocker (4 Fun-Unbelievable Fun Boys), born in Boston, Massachusetts

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1877 – Pietro Antonio Coppola, Italian composer, dies at 83
1896 – Antonio Peña y Goñi, Spanish composer, dies at 50
1939 – Lois Weber, American film director who became the first woman to direct a full feature-length film (The Merchant of Venice) and the first to own her own studio, dies of a stomach ulcer at 60
1958 – Bart van der Leck, Dutch painter (Style), dies at 81
1979 – Dimitris Psathas, Greek playwright (b. 1907)
1997 – André Boucourechliev, French composer (b. 1925)

More Famous Deaths »

Read More

How to Teach Your Child to Read

Teaching a child to read is a fulfilling and educational process, both for the parent and child. Whether you home school your kids or just want to give your child a head-start, you can begin teaching your child to read at home. With the right tools and tactics, your child will be reading in no time.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Starting Early
Read to your child on a regular basis. As with all things, it’s difficult to learn anything without exposure to it. In order to get your child interested in reading, you should be reading to them on a regular basis. If you’re able, this should start when they are an infant and continue through their school years. Read books with stories they comprehend; at a young age this may lead you to read 3-4 small books a day.
Books that combine other senses besides listening help your small child to comprehend the story as you read it. For example, read many books that have pictures, tactile pages, sounds, or have accompanying scents.
Try reading them books that might slightly challenge their comprehension level but that have an interesting or engaging story.[1]
Ask interactive questions. Even before your child learns to read, they can learn reading comprehension. As you read stories to them aloud, ask them questions about the characters or the plot. For a toddler, these may be questions like “Do you see the dog? What is the dog’s name?”. The questions can escalate in difficulty as the reading level does.
Help to teach your child critical thinking skills by asking open-ended questions about stories. You might not hear complex verbal responses until your child is four or five years old, but ask away and be patient.
Make books easily accessible. It’s no good if you have books around, but located in places that your child can’t easily take them. Keep books low to the ground and in typical play-areas so that your child begins to associate them with play activities.
Because your child may be touching and reading the books often, be sure to choose ones that have wipeable pages and that aren’t incredibly sentimental. Pop-up books may not be the best option for young children.
A fancy bookshelf may seem like the most attractive option, but until your child is in school focus on the utilitarian purposes of book storage.
Set up a reading space next to the bookshelf. Set some beanbags, pillows, and comfy chairs around to sit in while reading. The top of the bookshelf can hold cups and snacks for having while reading.
Set a good example. Show your child that reading is interesting and worthwhile by reading for yourself. Spend a minimum of ten minutes a day reading when your child is around, so that they see you enjoying the activity on your own. Even if you’re not an avid reader, find something to read – a magazine, the newspaper, or a cookbook all count. Soon they’ll become interested in reading on their own, simply as a result of seeing you doing it too.
Include your child in your reading time. If you’re reading something child-friendly, tell them about what you’re reading. Accompany this by pointing to words on the page to help them connect the lines on the page with the sounds that form words.
Get access to a library. This can be done in two ways: create your own mini-library at home by collecting dozens of books in your child’s reading level, or make weekly trips to the local public library together to check out books. Having a variety of books on hand (especially with an older child) will add interest for reading, and help to incorporate more vocabulary into their knowledge base.
That being said, don’t turn down a request to re-read a favorite book just because it’s already been read a dozen times. [2]
Start to make word-sound associations. Before you even start getting into the alphabet and sound specifics, help your child recognize that the lines on the page are directly correlated to the words you are speaking. As you read aloud to them, point to each word on the page at the same time you say it. This will help your child grasp the pattern of words/lines on the page relating to the words you speak in terms of length and sound.
Avoid using flashcards. Some companies have advertised specialized flashcards to help babies, toddlers, and preschool age children to read. In general, flashcards are not the most useful or effective technique for teaching reading skills. Time spent reading stories with your child will be much more beneficial than flashcards. “Reading aloud to young children, particularly in an engaging manner, promotes emergent literacy and language development and supports the relationship between child and parent. In addition it can promote a love for reading which is even more important than improving specific literacy skills.”[3][Edit]Teaching the Basics
Teach your child the alphabet. When your child has developed word awareness, begin breaking down words into individual letters. Although the alphabet song is the most classic means of teaching the alphabet, try getting creative. Explain each of the letters with their name, but don’t worry about trying to incorporate the sounds the letters make yet.
Teach lowercase letters first. Capital letters account for only five percent of all letters in writing English. Therefore, pay more attention to teaching the lowercase letters. lowercase letters are far more important in developing reading skills.
Try making each of the letters out of play-DOH, playing a toss game (where the child tosses a beanbag/ball onto a specific letter on the floor), or fishing for foam letters in the bathtub. These are all interactive games that encourage development on multiple levels.[4]
Develop phonemic awareness. One of the most important steps in teaching reading is associating a spoken sound with a letter or letter-pair. This process is known as phonemic awareness. There are 44 speech sounds created by the 26 letters in our alphabet, and each sound must be taught paired with its letter(s) counterpart. This includes the long and short sound produced by each individual letter, as well as the specialized sounds some combined letters make (like ‘ch’ and ‘sh’).
Focus on a single letter/part/sound at a time. Avoid confusion and build a solid foundation by working at a steady pace through all of the speech sounds.
Give real life examples of each speech sound; for example, state that the letter ‘A’ makes the ‘ah’ sound, like at the beginning of the word ‘apple.’ This can be turned into a guessing game, when you speak an easy word (like apple) and have the child guess the letter that it starts with.
Use games similar to those used when teaching the alphabet, that combine critical thinking on the part of the child in order to determine sound/letter correlations. See the aforementioned list for ideas, but substitute in sounds.
It is easier for children to develop phonemic awareness when words are broken down into their smallest parts. This can be done with the clapping game (clapping out each syllable in a word) or by sounding-out words into their individual letters.[5]
Teach your child rhymes. Rhyming teaches phonemic awareness and letter recognition, in addition to the most basic English words. Read nursery rhymes to your child, and then eventually make lists of easy-to-read rhymes such as mop, top, flop, pop, and cop. Your child will begin to see the patterns of sounds that are made when certain letters are combined – in this case, the sound ‘o-p’ makes.
Teach your child to read using explicit phonics. Traditionally, children are taught to recognize a word based on its size, the first and last letters, and the general sound. This method of teaching is known as implicit phonics – working from the largest piece down. However, studies have shown that readable vocabulary dramatically increases (from 900 words to 30,000 words by the third grade) when taught in the opposite fashion: breaking each word into the smallest parts, and building them up into a full word – explicit phonics. Help your child to begin reading by having them sound-out each individual letter without looking at the overall word first.
Don’t move onto explicit phonics until your child has developed adequate phonemic awareness. If they cannot associate sounds with letters or letter pairs quickly, they need a bit more practice before moving onto complete words.
Have your child practice decoding. Classically known as ‘sounding out’ words, decoding is when a child reads a word by making the sounds of each individual letter, rather than trying to read the whole word at once. Reading is broken up into two primary parts: decoding/reading a word, and comprehending its meaning. Don’t expect your child to recognize and comprehend words just yet; have them focus on decoding and sounding out word parts..
Don’t use whole stories or books yet; have your child read from word lists or from a basic story (not focusing on the plot). This is another great time to use rhymes for practice.
Decoding aloud is typically easier for the child (and you) to learn how to say the word. Have them break it into parts with clapping if necessary.
Do not be rigid in how the child pronounces the sounds. Regional accents and weak auditory skills make it hard for children to say most sounds in an academically correct way. Accept a reasonable effort. Recognize that learning sounds is only an intermediate step to learning to read, it is not the goal.[6]
Do not worry about grammar.. Preschoolers, kindergartners, and first graders are very concrete in the way they think and cannot handle complicated concepts. By age four, most English speaking children already have an excellent grasp of grammar and in due time, they will learn all the formal grammatical rules. At this point, you need to concentrate only on the mechanical skill of reading, that is learning to decode new words and incorporating them in memory to build fluency.
Build up an archive of sight words. Certain words in the English vocabulary are spoken often, but don’t follow the typical phonics rules. These words are easier to memorize by shape association than by sound, and are therefore known as ‘sight words.’ Some sight words include ‘they,’ ‘she’, ‘an,’ ‘said,’ and ‘the.’ The complete list of sight words, called the Dolch list, can be found online and broken down into sections to work through.
Show your child sight words on a piece of paper. Le them copy it and after telling them what the word is, ask them to tell YOU what the words is.[Edit]Increasing Difficulty
Begin giving your child complete stories. Odds are, your child will be in school by the time they are able to read and will be given their own reading material by their teachers. Help them to read these whole stories by encouraging explicit phonics use, and recognizing vocabulary. As their word recognition increases, they’ll be able to more fully understand story plots and meanings.
Allow your child to look at the pictures – it doesn’t count as cheating if they do. Image and word association is a helpful aspect of building vocabulary.
Have your child describe the story to you. After every reading session, have your child describe what the story was about to you. Try to get them to be detailed, but don’t expect an elaborate response. An easy and fun way to help encourage this is to use puppets who represent characters in the story, so your child can describe it to you through them.
Ask questions about the stories. Similar to when you were reading stories to your child, every time your child reads ask them questions about what they’ve just read. At first it will be difficult for them to think critically about meanings of words and the buildup of character development and plot (or the semblance of those things in the most basic of stories), but over time they will develop the necessary skills to answer questions.
Make a questions list that your child can read; their ability to read and understand the provided questions is nearly as helpful as answering the questions themselves.
Start with direct questions, such as ‘who was the main character in the book?,’ instead of more abstract questions like ‘why was the main character upset?’
Incorporate writing in with the reading. Reading is a necessary precursor to writing, but as your child develops reading skills have them practice their writing in conjunction. Children learn to read faster and easier if they learn to write at the same time. The motor memory of the letters, listening to their sounds and seeing them in writing will reinforce new learning. So, teach your child to write letters and words.
You’ll notice an enhanced reading ability as your child learns to spell by decoding and sounding out words. Work slowly though, and don’t expect perfection.
Continue reading to your child. Just as you taught your child the joy of reading before they knew how, you should continue to promote reading by reading to/with them on a daily basis. They’ll develop a stronger phonemic awareness when they can see words as you read them, rather than struggling to do both at the same time themselves.
Have your child read aloud to you. You’ll be given a better idea of your child’s reading ability when they read out loud, and they’ll be forced to slow down their reading to correctly sound out words. Avoid stopping your child to correct them while reading though, as doing so can interrupt their train of thought and make comprehending what they’re reading more difficult.
Reading out loud doesn’t have to be limited to stories; whenever you are around words, have your child sound them out to you. Road signs are a great example of something your child sees on a daily basis, and can practice reading out loud to you.[7][Edit]Tips
If your child has no patience to learn to read and would rather watch TV, try turning on the closed-captions and encouraging them to follow along.
Babies and Toddlers cannot learn how to sound out words. They can recognize symbols and correlate them to familiar objects or vocabulary, but words are complex symbols, and flashcards are not likely to lead to true mastery (e.g. distinguishing cork from clock, or agree from argue)
Most children are not developmentally ready to begin sounding out words until about 5-7 years of age.
Many children begin to develop phonemic awareness at age four. You could begin teaching the sounds of letters at about four years. Simple reading instructions can be started about the same time.
Don’t rush into it! Give your child time. Read to them at least every day.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Teach Reading Comprehension
Improve Critical Thinking Skills
Teach Critical Thinking
Get Your Child to Love Reading
Raise a Child Who Loves to Read
Teach Reading to Children (for Teachers)
Teach Reading Skills
Teach Your Child Phonological Awareness
Teach Children Phonics
Teach Letter Sounds[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.oprah.com/oprahsbookclub/The-Best-Ways-to-Teach-Kids-to-Read/4

↑ http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/again-again-that-is-the-best-way-to-learn-to-read-8518000.html

↑ Duursma, E. v., Augustyn, M., & Zuckerman, B. (2008). Reading aloud to children: the evidence. Archives of disease in childhood 93, no. 7, 554-557.

↑ http://www.notimeforflashcards.com/2013/04/50-ways-to-teach-your-child-to-read.html

↑ http://www.takepart.com/article/2013/03/19/how-choose-school-part-3-teaching-your-kid-read

↑ http://www.icanteachmychild.com/2012/02/10-steps-to-teaching-your-child-to-read/

↑ http://www.mumsnet.com/books/teach-your-child-to-read

Read More