How to Help a Suicidal Family Member

Hearing a family member talk about suicide, or suspecting that they’re thinking about it, is extremely difficult. Knowing how and when to help is a tough call, and being there for a depressed loved one can be very stressful. While there aren’t easy answers, you can help a suicidal family member if you recognize their risk for suicide, look for warning signs, and support them over time.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Looking for Suicide Warning Signs
Notice how they are acting. A big change in behavior is one warning sign that someone may be considering suicide. Paying attention to how the person is acting can help you prevent their suicide.[1]
Sometimes people start acting recklessly when they are considering suicide. For example, if your dad starts riding his motorcycle without a helmet, he may be considering suicide.
Look for signs like giving away possessions that they really care about. For example, if your cousin gives you her favorite necklace for no reason, she might be suicidal.
Pay attention if they don’t seem interested in things they usually enjoy. For instance, if your aunt loves swimming, but suddenly stopped going for no reason, this might be a warning sign for suicide.
Listen to what they are saying. There are several phrases and comments your family member may say that are warning signs that they are considering suicide. You can help your suicidal family member by listening for signs of hopelessness or giving up.[2]
If your family member says things like, “I don’t have anything to live for” or “I’m just so tired of life” it is probably a sign they’re considering suicide.
Listen for phrases that suggest your family member feels like the world would be better without them.
For example, “Everyone is better off without me” or “It’ll be better if I’m just not here.”
Notice if they say no one gets them or cares about them. For instance, comments like “No one cares or understands me” or “You don’t get me.”
Pay attention to their feelings. You can help a suicidal family member if you notice when they seem to be having lots of feelings that may indicate suicide risk.[3] Being aware of their feelings of depression, hopelessness, extreme frustration, and exhaustion can help you help your family member.
For example, your brother used to be pretty calm and laid-back. Now he is grumpy, sensitive, and sad all the time. It might be a warning sign for suicide.
You can ask how your family member is feeling by saying, “How have you been feeling lately? Have you been depressed or upset a lot?”
If they mention having feelings of guilt, failure, hopelessness, depression, or anxiety, you should pay attention.
Some people are more peaceful and less agitated when they are considering suicide because they think they’ve found a solution to their problems.[Edit]Helping Your Family Member Right Now
Determine their intent. If your family member is in the middle of a suicide crisis or you think they might be, you can help them by determining how serious they are about attempting suicide. Knowing their intent will help you decide the best thing to do to help.
Let your family member know you care and ask them if they are thinking about suicide. You could say, “I’m concerned. Have you thought about suicide?”
If they say they have thought about suicide, you should find out if they have thought about how, when, and where they will do it.
You might ask, “Do you have a plan for how to do it? Do you already know when you will do it?”
If you think they intend to attempt suicide soon, then don’t leave them alone. If you can’t stay, contact someone else to come stay. Don’t leave until the other person arrives.
Use your ‘CLUES’. Remembering the acronym CLUES will help you know what to do if your family member is suicidal right now. It reminds you to connect (C) with your family member and listen (L) to them. It also reminds you to understand (U) their feelings, express (E) concern, and seek (S) help.
Connect with your family member. You can help your suicidal family member by letting them know that you care about them and are there for them.[4] Connecting with them lets them know that someone realizes how bad things are for them and wants to help make it better.
Connect with your family member by saying things like, “You may feel alone, but you aren’t. I’m here for you.”
Don’t tell them that their problems aren’t that bad or that they should cheer up. It will make them feel like you don’t understand. Don’t ask them to explain the reasons for their feelings either because this may seem like you are minimizing their feelings. Just let them know that you are there for them.
Try saying something like, “I know it’s really hard for you right now, and there aren’t any easy solutions. But we can work this out.”
Listen to what they have to say. You don’t have to talk to your family member a lot or say anything at all. Just being with them, giving them a chance to talk about how they are feeling, and listening to them will help them.[5]
Let your family member know they have your attention by getting rid of distractions. Cut the TV or music off. Put your electronic devices on silent.
Keep your phone nearby in case you need to call for help, but don’t keep checking notifications.
Understand their feelings. Don’t try to offer advice or tell your family member what to do. Instead, put yourself in your suicidal family member’s shoes and think about how they are feeling so you understand what they are going through.[6]
Think to yourself, “How would I feel if I was in this situation? Can I understand how they might feel like they do?”
You can tell your family member, “I know what it feels like to be discouraged. I can only imagine how hard it must be for you.”
Express your concern for them. You can help a suicidal family member simply by letting them know that you care about them, are worried about them, and want to help.[7] Like connecting with your family member, expressing your concern is a way to show them you understand the seriousness of their feelings.
Be sincere and genuine when you are talking to them.
You can say, “I don’t know everything you are dealing with but I know that I want you around and that I love you.”
You might say something like, “I’m concerned about you and want to help you with this situation.”
Seek help for your family member. If things get too out-of-hand and you think your family member is going to attempt suicide right now, then get help immediately. Even if your family member doesn’t want help, you should get it so that you can keep your family member safe and prevent them from attempting suicide.[8]
Call 911 or a crisis hotline like 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK. You can also message the Crisis Text Line at 741741 to talk to someone over text.
A suicidal person can be taken to the emergency room if they might be in immediate danger or are hurting themselves.
Tell your family member that you are worried and want to keep them safe so you are getting help.
You might say, “I want to keep you safe and I know this is the best way to do that right now.”
If you need to, then call for help without them knowing or text someone and tell them to call for help.
If your loved one is seeing a mental health professional currently, then you may want to alert their therapist that you believe they are suicidal or encourage your loved one to call their therapist.[Edit]Recognizing Their Suicide Risk
Spend time with them. The easiest way to determine your family member’s risk for suicide and see warning signs is to spend time with them.[9] Being around them allows you the opportunity to notice what they are saying and how they are acting. It also gives you the chance to talk to them about things going on in their life.
You can do something as simple as call or video chat with them.
You can also spend time in person just by visiting them or hanging out for a little while.
Ask them how their life is going in general. For instance, you might say, “How are things going? Anything major happened recently?”
Ask about recent risks. There are some stressors that can make it more likely that someone may attempt suicide. Asking your family member about these things can help you understand how at risk they may be for attempting suicide.[10]
Find out if anyone they care about has died recently. Death of a loved one, and in particular suicide, can put your family member at greater suicide risk.
You might indirectly ask your family member about recent deaths by saying, “How is everyone doing? Are all your friends and family doing okay?”
Ask about recent losses like a break-up, losing a job, or losing a title or position.
For example, you could ask, “How’s school and your job going? How are you doing with basketball?”
Find out about on-going and past risks. Some things may be going on in your family member’s life that have been happening for a while that may put them at risk for suicide. There may also be some things in your family member’s past that put them at greater risk. Finding out about these things will help you prevent them from attempting suicide.[11]
Determine if they have attempted suicide before because this puts them at greater risk for trying it again.
Find out whether your family member is being or has been abused, bullied, or victimized.
If your family member has chronic pain or a mental illness they may view suicide as a way to end their suffering.
Ask whether anyone else in the family has attempted or died by suicide. A family history of suicide can increase a person’s risk of attempting it.
You might ask, “Has anyone in the family attempted or died from suicide that you know of?”
You may also want to find out if they are taking any SSRI antidepressants because these can increase thoughts of suicide in some people.[Edit]Supporting Them Over Time
Form a support team. Your family member may ask you not to tell anyone else what is going on. But, to help them, you need to let someone close to both of you know what is going on. Having a support team will make it less stressful for everyone involved and will make it easier to make sure the person isn’t suicidal anymore.[12]
Let your suicidal family member know that you want to tell someone else can help you all with the situation.
You might say, “I’m not trying to tell everyone what is going on, but we do need to let someone else know so that they can help us with this.”
Try to avoid going behind their back, but if the suicidal person is a child, is being abused, or if you’re under 18, you should definitely tell an adult you trust as soon as possible.
If you have to, you can tell someone else without specifically mentioning suicide. For example, “My cousin is dealing with emotional stuff we need help with.”
Recruit the help of a doctor or therapist as soon as possible, because they have the necessary training to deal with these situations.
Support groups can also help with specific problems. Try looking online for support groups in your area, or ask your loved one’s doctor or therapist for support group recommendations.
Create a safety plan for the suicidal person. This plan helps your suicidal family member in a lot of ways. It lets you and the support team know what to do and who to call if your family member shows signs that they may be considering suicide again.[13]
Download or print a copy of Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s Suicide Prevention Safety Plan. Share it with the people on the support team
Ask your family member to take part in creating their safety plan. This can help them know that people care about them.
For example, you could say, “I’d like to put together a plan so that if you are feeling really bad again we’ll know how to handle it in advance.”
If possible, get a therapist or doctor to help you create the plan. They will have great suggestions on how to make the plan the most effective.
Check on your family member often. Sometimes people will stop checking on their suicidal family member after the immediate threat is over. But your family member still needs support and still needs to know that you care.[14] Checking on your suicidal family member also helps them by letting you know if something is wrong before the situation gets really bad again.
Tell your family member, “I’m just checking in to see how things are going with you.”
Spending time with them on a regular basis is a way to check on them without it seeming weird. Make sure that your loved one is not left alone for long periods of time because this may cause them to ruminate. Encourage them to keep a regular schedule and to see friends and family often.
You don’t even have to mention suicide when you are checking on your family member. Just observe them and see if things seem okay.
If you have a doctor or therapist on the support team, ask them if they can check-in with your suicidal family member on a regular basis.
Promote healthy choices for your family member. Emotional stress, like considering suicide, can cause physical problems. At the same time, some physical problems can cause a person to become so emotionally stressed that they consider suicide. You can help a suicidal family member by encouraging them to take care of their emotional and physical health.
Talk to your family member about getting the right amount of sleep. You could say, “Make sure you’re getting six to eight hours of sleep, but don’t overdo it.”
Promote physical activity by inviting your family member to go for a hike, a game of racquetball, or a quick tennis match.
Encourage them to avoid drugs and alcohol as a way to cope with their feelings. Substance abuse can increase the chances that your family member will attempt suicide.
Help your loved one come up with proactive solutions to their problems. For example, if their financial situation is driving their decision to take their life, then helping your loved one develop a plan to get out of debt, then this may help them to feel better about the situation.
Remember to take care of yourself as well. Supporting your loved one is important, but it can also be difficult to focus on your own well-being as well. Be sure to practice self-care so you don’t feel stressed and to help you understand your own needs. If you develop a plan and you still feel like you’re overwhelmed physically or emotionally, try finding professional help to guide you through any difficult times.[Edit]Video
[Edit]Warnings
Your family member may reject your help. This doesn’t mean you should give up.
Do not pressure the suicidal person into talking. Be supportive and encouraging, so that they can share their innermost thoughts and feelings if they want to.
Call 911 or a crisis hotline like 1-800-SUICIDE or 1-800-273-TALK if your family member is threatening suicide right now. If you’re more comfortable sending a text, message 741741 to get in touch with a trained counselor at the Crisis Text Line.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Cope when Someone You Care About Is Suicidal
Survive when a Parent Threatens Suicide
Help a Suicidal Friend
Help Someone Who Is Thinking About Committing Suicide[Edit]References↑ https://afsp.org/about-suicide/risk-factors-and-warning-signs/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/inthemix/educators/lessons/depression2/verbal_signs.html

↑ https://afsp.org/about-suicide/risk-factors-and-warning-signs/

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/suicide-prevention/suicide-prevention-helping-someone-who-is-suicidal.htm#tip2

↑ https://www.lifeline.org.au/Get-Help/Facts—Information/Preventing-Suicide/Preventing-Suicide

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/suicide-prevention/suicide-prevention-helping-someone-who-is-suicidal.htm#tip2

↑ http://www.suicideispreventable.org/

↑ https://www.lifeline.org.au/Get-Help/Facts—Information/Preventing-Suicide/Preventing-Suicide

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/suicide-prevention/suicide-prevention-helping-someone-who-is-suicidal.htm#tip2

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/suicide-prevention/suicide-prevention-helping-someone-who-is-suicidal.htm#tip2

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/suicide-prevention/suicide-prevention-helping-someone-who-is-suicidal.htm#tip2

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/suicide-prevention/suicide-prevention-helping-someone-who-is-suicidal.htm#tip2

↑ http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/getinvolved/suicide-prevention-toolkit.aspx

↑ http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/getinvolved/suicide-prevention-toolkit.aspx

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Today in History for 18th November 2019

Historical Events

1883 – Standard time zones forms by railroads in US and Canada
1932 – 5th Academy Awards: Fredric March and Wallace Beery in 1st ever tie for Best Actor. “Grand Hotel” and Helen Hayes also win.
1943 – 444 British bombers attack Berlin
1985 – Enterprise (OV-101) flies from Kennedy Space Center to Dulles Airport
1997 – Willem de Kooning painting “Two Standing Women” sold for $4,182,500
2018 – Apec Summit in Papa New Guinea fails to produce a joint agreement for first time in two decades after US and China clash on definition of trade

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1803 – Cornelis Broere, Dutch Roman Catholic priest and poet, born in Amsterdam (d. 1860)
1928 – Mickey Mouse, Disney cartoon strip character
1942 – Jeffrey Siegel, pianist (Chicago Symphony), born in Chicago, Illinois
1964 – Seth Joyner, NFL linebacker (Ariz, Green Bay Packers-Super Bowl 31)
1969 – Raghib Ismail, American NFL wide receiver/kick returner (Oakland Raiders), born in Elizabeth, New Jersey
1974 – Chloë Sevigny, American actress

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1170 – Albrecht I “Bear”, 1st margrave of Brandenburg (1150-70), dies at 70
1603 – Elisabeth van Nassau, daughter of Willem and Juliana van Stolberg, dies at 61
1887 – Gustav Fechner, German psychologist and physicist (Weber–Fechner law), dies at 86
1971 – [Herman] Junior Parker, American blues singer and musician (Mystery Train), dies during brain operation at 39
1987 – Jacques Anquetil, French road cyclist (Tour de France 1957, 61-64; first 5-time winner), dies of stomach cancer at 53
1999 – Doug Sahm, American country singer (Texas Tornadoes-Dinero), dies at 58

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Get Over Writer’s Block

Suddenly your thought processes cease. You seem to have lost your concentration. You have no idea what to write. It is scary, especially when you are in the middle of writing a long novel and feel like you’ve hit a brick wall. Don’t worry — you’re not alone. Almost every serious writer has dealt with this problem and has come out stronger on the other side. The following are simple, but not foolproof, ways to overcome writer’s block.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Writing Whatever Comes to Mind
Accept that you have writer’s block. When you have writer’s block, no ideas spring to mind when you are writing and you are stuck for what to write. Understand that writer’s block is easy to overcome, and there are many ways to get over it. Do not stop to the idea that you will never write again.
Write about anything. Anything in the world – even write about pineapples. It gets your brain to think more and be creative. This works best for many people. Once you’ve thought of a paragraph or a few sentences about your topic go back to your story.
Get some ideas on paper without worrying about how they sound. The writing does not have to be polished; writers often have writer’s block because they worry about the quality of their writing. Remember that nobody has to see a word you’ve written except you. You can show it to the world when you’re ready.
Try a change of pace. For example, if you have a long, action-packed sequence, try going over to a reasoned conversation. Be sure that the changeover makes sense. You don’t have to write in one speed or one tone all the time. Something completely different can really end up inspiring you to reach new depths. If you tend to write dramatic scenes, switch to something a bit more lighthearted, or vice versa.
Decide when to give up on an idea. Look over what you have written and ask yourself, “Does this seem to be leading up to anything?” If you feel like it’s going absolutely nowhere, then it may be time to move on from it.
Decide whether the situation truly feels real. You may have writer’s block because the situation doesn’t seem realistic to you. Don’t be afraid to rewrite parts of the story to make it more natural.
Try starting from another part of your story. If you are having trouble with the beginning, write the middle or end. After you have written another part of the story, things may start to fall into place where you were before.
Writing out of order may require more familiarity with the plot so that everything makes sense from start to finish. At the same time, it may help you think out the details when you cannot decide what to do with your story. Writing a good ending while you think of about the rest of your story will help structure it.
Write something totally different. It may surprise you how much you like it! A monologue, song, poem, or even taking a short amount of time to write a scene from a completely different story will get your writer’s blood flowing again.
Use prompts. Out of all writers block stoppers, using prompts is one of the most effective ones. Use any random word or sentence to help you come up with a plot and start writing your story. For example, if you asked a friend to give you a prompt and they said the words “Forever” and “Passion” you would most likely think of a romance. And if they were to give you the phrase “Bite me” then you would most likely think of a vampire or werewolf. (Twilight anybody?)
Use the world around you. Use the people around you and their personalities. Use the nature, atmosphere, and scenes that surround you to build up your story/plot. The best possible way to do this is to use a diary. Jot down your daily life, random thoughts and feelings.
If you can’t possibly think of something to write about, just name a bunch of objects or ideas. Even if you think one won’t work. It’s a simple way to cure writer’s block. To make it easier, say everything you’re thinking about out loud. You’ll bump into something. Good luck![Edit]Starting with a Character
Get a paper and a pen or a pencil. Or use your computer, if that works better. This is the first thing you need to channel a character — a blank canvas.
Write down a name, the first name that comes to mind, at the top of the page. It can be the name of a person you know, a person you read about, or just something that randomly pops into your head.
Ask questions about the person. Under the name, start making a list, ask yourself questions like: Who is this person? How does he/she look like? Does this person have any siblings, if yes then who?
Let the character develop. Allow the character to form in your mind, see the character in your head, become the character.
Try to visualize the life of the character. What is it like when the character wakes up in the morning? Does he/she go to work or school? How does he/she feel about his family? What does he/she like to have for lunch? All of these details add up to a life.
Look over what you’ve written. When you are done with the list, read through it and hopefully, you will be able to place this character in a scenario, that might spark the idea for a story… maybe just one detail you came up with can spark your interest in an entire story.
Play the “and then” game. Surprisingly, this game is a great way to cut yourself out of writer’s block. Start with any random sentence, for example, “One day there was a girl named Destiny” then you continue the story with “and then” after every sentence. “And then she met a guy named Daniel. And then she found out he was a vampire” etc. That might not be how you write a story, but, the deeper you get, you end up finding a plot.
Write a backstory about your main character. Create tons of info about your main character — why is her hair so short when all of the other girls have long plaits? Her hair was like that too, but an evil man tried to cut her neck in a chase and she ducked, her hair flying up, causing him to slice it, instead.[Edit]Getting Inspired Through Reading
Reading a novel. It could help with inspiration. Reread a book that you enjoy if you want to. You can even plot the book, or write down what it is about the characters or scenes that really inspires you. Try picking something in the genre you’re writing in, whether it’s Sci-Fi, Romance, or a Thriller, to get ideas about your subject matter.
Read your previous work. If you reread your story or other previous stories, it might spark something in your brain. Inspiration is a mysterious thing; it can come back at any time.
Read about a person you admire. Read a story about someone who you like or admire and make a character based on that person, include their personality traits and hobbies so if you do write a story on them it makes it easier when you’re knowing almost everything about them.
Read poetry. Poetry can also inspire you to write fiction — or to write some poetry of your own! You may be surprised, but an image in a poem, whether it’s the “Silken, sad, uncertain, rustling of each purple curtain” in Poe’s “The Raven,” or the line, “You, my father, there on the sad height,” from Dylan Thomas’ poem, “Rage, Rage Against the Dying of the Light,” that brings an image or an idea to mind, soon enough, you’ll be inspired by a completely new idea!
Read non-fiction. Hey, picking up a book about a historical event, such at the Montgomery Bus Boycotts or the Siege of Leningrad, can also help you come up with a new vision or idea that took place during that time. Soon, you’ll have new characters, plots, or lines of dialogue floating through your head.
Rewrite an existing article. Find a newspaper and rewrite the article — that murder last week was a ghost getting revenge on her evil grandson, and… (this can help get ideas flowing).[Edit]Avoiding Perfection
Take a break. Sometimes a nap helps (you never know what you’ll dream about, plus sometimes, while you’re lying in bed, you’ll have a sudden flash of inspiration. You should write it down instantly, even if it’s in the middle of the night.) or you can watch a movie or go for a walk. Seeing new things can help stimulate your brain and thus giving your imagination a boost. Cook a meal, clean the house or play with your pets. Completely forget about your story for a while.
Don’t be hard on yourself if you can’t think of anything. If you really can’t write a word and would rather lie down and relax or do something else, don’t punish yourself. Even the world’s best writers can sometimes only write for an hour or a few hours a day. Gustave Flaubert, the author of the classic, Madame Bovary, was said to only write a single sentence per day!
Don’t edit while you write. You can obsess over every sentence or every line later. If you are telling yourself that each paragraph absolutely must be absolutely perfect then you’ll never get to the next paragraph!
Don’t panic. Everyone gets writer’s block at least once in their lives as it’s perfectly normal. You can even say that going through writer’s block and breaking through it, will help you be an even more imaginative and creative writer.
Don’t compare yourself to your favorite writers. Okay, so maybe you don’t feel up to speed with Stephen King, Louis Sachar, Emily Bronte, or Dostoevsky. That doesn’t mean you should feel inadequate or like you’re the worst writer on the planet. Use these writers for inspiration, as a standard you’d like to achieve, one day, not as benchmarks for your own failure or success. Once you take the pressure off, you’ll be able to write much more freely.[Edit]Playing the “Crazy Game”
Get a blank piece of paper. This works best if you’re in a quiet place where you feel no judgment.
For about five minutes, try to think of the craziest sentence possible. For example, “The flying turtle ate the talking pineapple, even though he knew it was the unicorn’s best friend.” You can generate several crazy sentences and pick the best one if you’re really in the groove. Don’t judge yourself or hold back. Just write whatever comes to mind.
Take your crazy sentence and write it down. Repeat this until you have a list of three or more ideas.
Repeat the process until you have a paragraph full of crazy sentences. Make it as crazy as possible. If you are typically a sensible and serious person, you should take a break and attempt to write the most boring story ever. Once you’ve found at least 5-6 “good” crazy sentences, you should have something to work with. Read them over. They’ll make you laugh, feel looser, and feel less restrained about always writing the most perfect sentence in the world.
Pick one sentence that stands out and get inspired by it. Use that one sentence as the opening of a short story, or even a short short-story. Don’t let it hold you back. Maybe even just pick one or two phrases or words from that sentence, and use them for inspiration. Keep writing until you feel relaxed and like you have something to work with!
If none of the sentences inspire you to write a story, use the craziness itself as inspiration. Okay, so maybe all of your sentences were too crazy or ridiculous to work with. That’s okay. Let the process itself inspire you and make see that it’s easy to let loose and generate crazy sentences once in a while — it’s not about achieving perfection! After this exercise, you can just start trying to get back into the same writing you were doing before while feeling more confident about your ability to be creative! [Edit]Playing the “Wikipedia Prompt Game”
Get your preferred writing medium, pen, and paper, Microsoft Word, etc.
Then go to Wikipedia.org and click on the link “Random Article” and based on that article write something, anything even if it is only a short six-word story.
Repeat as often as you like, maybe try to do it once a day so you get into writing more often.[Edit]Writer’s Block Help
WH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5dd2093211fc6’)Sample Writing ExercisesWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5dd2093212a40’)Sample Freewrite About AnythingWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5dd20932134ac’)Sample Freewrite About a Name
[Edit]Tips
Play some music appropriate to the scene in your story. You could even make up an entire playlist for your story. Music is a great way to break down that writer’s block; listen to what you enjoy, but don’t let the music become a serious distraction. You need to spend most of your time writing, not singing along or dancing.
If you can’t do any of those things, just read: reading can give you many ideas about how to write and what to write. Take a break; you may need it. Try to write every day, but do not force yourself too much. Your writing will not benefit from it.
Don’t be afraid to stress your character’s personality a bit — but not too much or they’ll become very disliked (unless they’re the antagonist or are supposed to be disliked).
Get it written, it doesn’t need to be “right”. Your first draft isn’t your final draft, after all. Don’t be such a perfectionist.
If you enjoy art, try drawing one of the characters, scenes, places, objects, or anything else from your story; it will really help with your writer’s block. Designing your envisioned book cover may help you get excited about your story and revitalize your inspiration for it.
Next time, get to the point in your writing where you are excited to pick up where you left off. Even if that means having to pull yourself out of the writing.
Write a paragraph that sounds good – exciting, touching, or any other type of good – then see if you can’t come up with a story to fit it.
Listen to inspiring music. Preferably something that fits the theme of your story, or a certain point you’ve gotten to. If it’s a romance novel and you’re stuck on a scene that you want to put together perfectly for the two lovers, listen to something that mirrors it musically.
You can use these steps to visualize a storyline, it works just as well.
Do a mock interview with your characters to practice characterization, or design some character sheets for them. Understanding your character is a key part of writing!
Leave it alone for a while. If you’re ever just thinking one day while on writer’s block, you may wind up finding a new idea stored somewhere in your brain! Just leave it be, and if you don’t stress about it, you’ll be fine.
When stuck on a character, imagine what they look like, what they’re wearing, or how they act.
Have fun while writing.
Don’t give up! Almost everyone goes through writer’s block. It doesn’t mean you have to stop writing.
Have a character do something they totally wouldn’t, like dye their hair purple.
Asking for help with the steps can reward an even better result.
Just wait, inspiration will strike eventually. If you have no ideas maybe you should leave the manuscript around for a few weeks and then come back to it.
You don’t have to use a manuscript book, use what you feel comfortable with. For example: a notebook, a writing pad, a computer, or even a drawing book.
Allow yourself to write crud. It can lead to new plot twists.
Your friends can help you come up with new ideas when you don’t have any. Try chatting with them about some of the scenes you’re having trouble with.
Pretend you are the character in the scene trying to solve the problem.
Travel, look around, take in your surroundings and use what you see. Are people mean or nice at the club, at the cafe, at the park?
Go to a quiet place with a pen you especially like, a pad or notebook that is comfortable and familiar and just start writing. Write out what you need to do today. Write out a quarrel you had with your husband, wife, child, or neighbor. Write out the ideal scenario for a meal on the patio with a few friends. Write anything except about the thing you are “blocked” about. Just write, fast and furiously, and from that writing, you will find the thread, or the fuel to continue with your project unimpeded.
Try meditating. It may help your mind to work again and recover from writer’s block.
Don’t be afraid to act out a few scenes to decide what happens next.
You can make the character like you. Are you dramatic, romantic, brave, or adventurous? Write about that and you can get a plot.[Edit]Warnings
Remember that it becomes more and more difficult to overcome writer’s block as you wait longer and longer to start writing.
Don’t get stressed about writer’s block, or it’ll seem much worse and may become incurable.
Don’t work with prompts that aren’t in your comfort zone.
Don’t ever stress over how difficult your writer’s block may be to overcome. If you keep thinking about it, it will stick around longer.
Don’t write just to write, it’ll make you go back and change it later.[Edit]Related wikiHows
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