How to Tie a Tie

Have you graduated beyond the clip-on tie? Beginning with these helpful instructions, a sharp-looking tie, a mirror, and some patience, you can become an expert in tying your own fashionable knot. You have several options available, from the versatile Four-in-Hand Knot to the classic Windsor.
If you’re helping someone else put on a tie, see this article for instructions from that perspective.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Tying the Traditional Windsor Knot (Extra Formal)
Put the tie around your neck. Make sure the wider end is on the right, and about 14 inches (36 cm) lower than the thinner side on the left.[1] The Windsor knot uses a lot of cloth, so the lower end should start a bit lower than you would usually position a tie.
Cross the wide end over the narrow end. Hold one end in each hand, then pass each of them to the opposite hand. The wide end should now be on your left side.[2][3]
Bring the wide end up through the neck loop. Using your right hand, hold the two ends where they cross near your collar. With your left hand, pull the wide end up through the neck loop from below.
Bring your tie back down. Rest the wide end back on your chest, to the left of the narrow end.
Fold it end behind the narrow end. Grab the wide end with your right hand and pull it back to the right side of your body, under the narrow end. Hold the knot near your collar in place with your left hand.
Bring the wide end up to the neck loop from the front. Keep it on the right side.
Pull the wide end through the neck loop. Insert the tip of the wide end and pull through, still on the right side.
Fold the wide end over the narrow end. Fold it back over from right to left, so the front side is visible again.
Pull the wide end through the neck loop from below. Bring the wide end back up through the neck loop one last time.
Insert the wide end through the front knot. Place the wide end through the horizontal knot at the front of the tie. Pull it through.
Tighten the knot. Hold the base of the front knot and squeeze gently from the sides. Slowly pull the wide end of the tie to bring the knot closer to the neck.[Edit]Using the Easiest Method (Four-in-Hand Knot)
Drape the tie around your neck. With your collar up and your shirt fully buttoned, place the tie around your shoulders. Hang the wider end of the tie on your right side, with the narrow end about 12 inches (30 cm) higher on the left.[4]
Cross the wide end over the narrow end. Bring the wide end to the left side of your body, over the narrow end. Hold the two pieces of cloth together with your left hand, near your neck.
Loop the wide end under the narrow end. Let go with your right hand. Tuck it underneath the narrow end, grab the wide end, and pull it back through to your right side.
Loop the wide end back over again. Cross it over the narrow end one more time, at the same point where your left hand is holding the knot together.
Pull the wide end up through the neck loop. Fold the tip of the wide end under itself and pull up through the neck loop.[5]
Insert the wide end down through the front knot. You should have a horizontal knot across the front of your tie. Hold this knot open with your finger and carefully insert the wide end.
Tighten the knot. Hold the narrow end and slide the front knot up to tighten the tie. Make sure your tie is straight and the length is appropriate, ideally ending at the top of your belt buckle.
Squeeze the sides of the knot gently to create a dimple just below it.
Tuck the narrow end of the tie into the loop on the back side of the wide end.
Fold your collar down, and make sure that the tie is covered by the collar all the way around your neck.[Edit]Tying the Pratt Knot (Basic Formal Knot)
Place the tie upside down around your collar. Unlike most knots, the Pratt knot begins with the tie upside down, so the seam of the tie is facing forward. Hang the wide end of the tie over your right side, and the narrow end over your left side.
This medium size knot suits most collars and builds.[6]
Check the position of the wide end. In a knotted tie, the wide end should just graze the top of your belt buckle.[7] At the start, however, raise or lower the wide end until it hangs 1–2 inches (2.5–5 cm) below this point. As a rule of thumb, the Pratt knot will lift the wide end by this distance as you tie the knot.[8]
The narrow end of the tie should be higher than the wide end. It will usually be around belly button level, but this is less important than the wide end’s placement.[9]
Cross the wide end under the narrow end. Move the wide end across your body to the left side, placing it underneath the narrow end.
Do not move the narrow end of the tie for any part of this knot.[10] Just hold it steady while you use the wide end.
Bring the wide end up to the loop around the neck. Place the tip on top of the loop, still on your left side.
Pull the wide end through the neck loop. Insert the wide end down into the loop from above. Pull it through in the same direction it lay before, on the left.
Fold the wide end over the narrow end, from left to right. This flips the wide end so the seam is no longer visible. The wide end will extend at an angle off to your right.
Pull the wide end up through the neck loop. Bring the wide end up to your neck loop again, but this time from below. Pull it through.
Tuck the wide end down through the new loop at the front. Your last fold created a horizontal loop at the front of your tie. Tuck the wide end through this loop, and pull straight down to tighten. The wide end should now rest in front of the narrow end.
Slide the knot to adjust. Pull down on the wide end to tighten. Slide the front knot up to the base of your collar to fasten the tie.To create a dimple just below the front knot, squeeze the sides of the knot gently as you tighten.[11][Edit]Tying a Half Windsor Knot (Formal)
Position the wide end on the right side. Place the tie around your neck and let the sides hang in front of you. The wide end should be on the right side of your body, and hang roughly 12 inches (30 cm) lower than the narrow end on the left.[12]
The Half Windsor is a triangular, symmetrical knot suitable for formal occasions. Larger than the Four-in-hand but less bulky than the Windsor, this can work with most neckties and collar types.[13] Neckties made from thicker fabric will likely require a spread or wide spread collar with this knot.[14]
Cross the wide end over the narrow end. Bring the wide end of the tie over to your left side, crossing over the narrow end.
Fold the wide end back under the narrow end. Complete a loop around the narrow end and pull the wide end back to the right side.The underside of the wide end should be visible at this point.
Take the wide end up to the neck loop. Raise the wide end up to the loop of necktie at your collar. Keep it on the right side.
Pull the wide end through the loop and to the left. Insert the wide tip down through the loop and pull it through from the left side, so it crosses under the narrow end.
Fold the wide end over the front of the narrow end. Bring the wide end back across the front and onto your right side.
Slide the wide end up through the neck loop. Fold the wide end up through the neck loop a second time.
Insert the wide end down through the front knot. Loosen the front knot with your finger and insert the wide end. Pull it through to rest over the narrow end.
Pull on the wide end to tighten. Gently squeeze the front knot as you pull to slide the knot up and create a dimple at the front of your tie.
[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
To make a dimple, hold the top blade on both edges, then pull it down gently until the top blade starts to tighten. A slightly convex shape should appear close to the knot. Use your thumb and forefinger to press the bottom of the knot into a V-shape and the convex will deepen to form the dimple.
If your tie has a loop underneath the wide side of the tie, you may slide the narrow side through that loop to prevent it from “peeking” from behind the wide side of the tie.
Ideally, the tip of the tie should graze the top of your belt buckle. It’s all right if the tie dips down to the bottom of the belt buckle (“Italian style”). If it’s any lower, try a knot that uses plenty of cloth (such as the Windsor), or switch to a shorter tie.[15] Similarly, if the tie ends above your belt, buy a longer tie or try the Pratt knot, which doesn’t use much cloth in the knot.
Left-handed people may find it easier to switch the starting positions of the wide and narrow ends. If you do this, switch all “left” and “right” instructions.
Make a mnemonic device to help you remember these steps, such as the word OUAT, which is an acronym for over, under, around and through.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Tie a Bow Tie
Shine Shoes
Look Good in a Suit
Tie a Silk Scarf
Choose a Dress Shirt
Wear-a-Tie-Clip[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.tie-a-tie.net/windsor/

↑ http://www.ties.com/how-to-tie-a-tie/windsor

↑ http://www.tie-a-tie.net/windsor/

↑ https://www.thetiebar.com/how-to-tie/four-in-hand

↑ https://www.thetiebar.com/how-to-tie/four-in-hand

↑ http://www.necktieadvisor.com/men%E2%80%99s-tie-knots-and-when-to-use-them/

↑ http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702303491404579391701064546672

↑ http://www.realmenrealstyle.com/pratt-shelby-milanese-necktie-knot/

↑ http://www.ties.com/how-to-tie-a-tie/pratt

↑ http://www.ties.com/how-to-tie-a-tie/pratt

↑ http://www.tie-a-tie.net/pratt/

↑ http://www.tie-a-tie.net/halfwindsor/

↑ Chic Simple, Shirt and Tie, p. 37, (1993), ISBN 0-500-01593-7

↑ http://www.necktieadvisor.com/men%E2%80%99s-tie-knots-and-when-to-use-them/

↑ http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702303491404579391701064546672

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Today in History for 19th November 2019

Historical Events

1879 – National Association of Trotting Horse Breeders determines what “is” a trotter
1990 – Greyhound files reoganization plan so they can be traded publicly
1991 – Baltimore Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken wins his 2nd AL MVP
1996 – Albert Belle, signs record five-year, $55 million with White Sox
1997 – McCaughey septuplets born to Bobbi McCaughey in Des Moines, Iowa. First set of septuplets to survive infancy.
2018 – Nissan chairman Carlos Ghosn arrested in Japan for financial misconduct

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1918 – Hendrik Christoffel Van de Hulst, Utrecht the Netherlands, Dutch astronomer who correctly predicted the existence of the 21 cm hyper-fine line of neutral atomic hydrogen in interstellar space
1944 – Dennis Hull, Canadian ice hockey player
1955 – Gloria Guida, Merano Italy, Miss Teenage Italy (1974)
1956 – Ann Curry, American journalist
1970 – Bhupinder Singh Jr, cricketer (Punjab and Indian ODI batsman)
1977 – Lady Davina EAB Windsor, daughter of English prince Richard

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

498 – Anastasius II, Pope (496-8) dies. Referred to by Dante in his Inferno XI, 8-9
1983 – Tom Evans, English bass guitarist (Badfinger) (b. 1947)
1990 – Sun Li-jen, Chinese general (b. 1900)
1994 – Dedrick Gobert, American actor (Boyz ‘n the Hood), shot to death at 22
1998 – Ted Fujita, Japanese-born American meteorologist (b. 1920)
2010 – Pat Burns, Canadian hockey coach (b. 1952)

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Add Certifications to a Resume

Certifications of various kinds can make an attractive addition to any resume. If you really want to make an impression, however, it’s important to know how to format them in a way that highlights them as relevant examples of specialized knowledge and experience. It’s a good idea to only include certifications that have something to do directly with the position you’re applying for. Once you’ve decided which certifications fit the bill, list them in their own section at the bottom or sidebar of your resume, condensing all the important details into 1-2 bullet-pointed lines for maximum readability.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Formatting Your Certifications on Your Resume
Give your certifications their own section of your resume. Rather than trying to cram your certifications in with your work or education history, tack on a whole new section titled “Certifications” where you can list them separately. That way, they’ll all be neatly organized in one place, so your employer won’t have to go hunting for them or be forced to pick them out of a jumble of other qualifications.[1]
Situate your Certifications section near the bottom of your resume after your more important sections. Alternatively, you can place it off on its own in a sidebar.
List your certifications in reverse chronological order. Head off your new section with the certification you were awarded most recently, then work your way down to your most dated distinction. Prospective employers will want to see your most up-to-date credentials first.[2]
This is the same order in which your work history and education will be displayed on your resume. When in doubt, go from newest to oldest.
Provide all relevant details about the certification in 1-2 bullet-pointed lines. Write out the full title of the certification first, followed by the name of the certifying authority, the date it was awarded, and finally the location, if applicable. Separate each item with a comma, and make sure all the information you include can fit on no more than a couple of lines.[3]
Each line in your Certifications section should look something like this: •Professional Secretarial Certificate, Association of Administrative Professionals, 2014, Chicago, IL[4]
Don’t abbreviate the title of your certification (like using “PMP” in place of “Project Management Professional”) unless you’ve already spelled it out in full. After that, it’s okay to use the shortened form.
The location designation really only matters for state-specific certifications, such as nursing and teaching licenses.
Mention less important certifications in your cover letter. If you’ve racked up any certifications over the years that are non-vital or only loosely related to your position, consider noting them in the description of yourself that you write to accompany your resume. This will allow you to provide further examples of the steps you’ve taken to advance your career without seeming like you’re desperate to fill up space.[5]
If you once took a training course on web-based public relations or corporate stress management techniques, you might refer to the experience when going over the details of your academic or professional journey.[Edit]Including the Right Certifications
List certifications that are relevant to your professional experience. As a general rule, it’s best to put a particular certification on your resume if and only if it has some connection to the job you’re applying for. A chartered financial consultant certificate, for example, is more likely to impress the hiring coordinator for a finance firm then a weekend scuba diving or long-distance reiki master certification.[6]
Any certifications you mention that don’t have any relation to your current career path will just take up valuable space that you could be using to showcase more important achievements.
This doesn’t mean that the miscellaneous certifications you’ve collected over the years are useless. It just means that you’ll be better served by saving them for an updated resume for a job in a related field.
Make sure the certifications you include are officially recognized. Not all certifications are made equal. Official certifications are always issued and authorized by an accredited organization, such as a professional association or academic institution. Since anyone can hand out an unofficial certification, they’re not worth much from a professional standpoint.[7]
Before you go out for a certain certification, check to see whether the organization granting it carries a seal of accreditation from a higher certifying body. This information will often be displayed loud and proud on the organization’s website or internal literature.
Similarly, special training courses can help round out a detailed resume, provided they were conducted by an accredited institution and resulted in an official certification.
Feel free to put academic certificates in your Certifications section. If you happen to hold a pre-degree certificate in a subject related to your chosen field, your resume is a good place to flaunt it. Earning an academic certificate shows that you’ve completed a certain amount of high-level education and testing, which is exactly what certifications are meant to do.[8]
Remember to reserve the Education section of your resume for more exemplary academic achievements like undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.
Look into the types of certifications that are most attractive to employers. Even if you have a slew of official certifications, some may be more enticing to your future boss than others. Certifications issued by notable national agencies like OSHA, FEMA, and the American Red Cross tend to draw the most positive attention from hiring directors. If you have the time, money, and motivation, beefing up your resume with a couple of high-profile certifications could potentially boost your career.[9]
Every industry has its own coveted certifications. Do a little research to find out which credentials are most highly regarded your field.
Examples of a few well-known, respectable certifications that could help you scale the corporate ladder include Project Management Professional (PMP), Certified Public Accountant (CPA), Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP), Certified Scrum Master (CSM), English as a Second Language (ESL), ServSafe food handling, and Commercial Driver’s License (CDL).[10]
Avoid adding online courses unless they resulted in an official certification. Online courses are a major gray area in resume writing. A good way to determine whether or not to list a given course is to consider what awaits you at the end. If it’s a widely-recognized certificate or license from an accredited organization, go ahead and include it. If it’s some sort of unofficial certificate or simply a better understanding of a niche field, it’s probably not worthy of inclusion.[11]
The term “online course” can basically mean anything—there are online courses in hypnosis, animal telepathy, virtual terraforming, and web-based pickup artistry. Needless to say, none of these subjects make for good resume material.[12][Edit]Tips
Seek out certifications that you think may advance your career or give you an edge over candidates with fewer credentials.
Don’t sweat it if you don’t have any certification worth adding to your resume. While they can enhance your prospects, they’re not as crucial as a solid education, abundant work experience, and good references.[Edit]References↑ https://my.wilson.edu/sites/default/files/uploaded/WilsonTeacher%20Resume%20packet2015.pdf

↑ https://www.socialwork.org/resources/resume-guide/

↑ https://www.socialwork.org/resources/resume-guide/

↑ https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/careerservices/cvguide/licenses

↑ https://fairygodboss.com/career-topics/certifications-on-a-resume

↑ https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/careerservices/cvguide/licenses

↑ https://medicine.umich.edu/sites/default/files/content/downloads/Williams-CV-1114.pdf

↑ https://fairygodboss.com/career-topics/certifications-on-a-resume

↑ https://medicine.umich.edu/sites/default/files/content/downloads/Williams-CV-1114.pdf

↑ https://www.simplemost.com/7-professional-certifications-can-help-boost-career/

↑ https://zety.com/blog/certifications-on-resume

↑ https://www.pcmag.com/feature/369051/the-weirdest-most-obscure-online-courses-you-can-take

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