How to Get Rid of Static Cling

Static cling is the result of electrical charges that build up in your clothes due to dryness and friction. There are a few tricks that will get rid of static cling quickly, but you may need to change the way you wash and dry your clothes if static cling becomes a big problem in your wardrobe. To remove cling quickly, rub your clothes with a metal object to remove the electrical charge. You can also rub lotion into your skin or spray your clothes with hairspray. For long term solutions, change the way you do your laundry. Add vinegar or baking soda to your wash cycle, and consider air drying your clothes to avoid static altogether.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using Metal to Remove Static
Slide the affected clothes through a metal hanger. After you’ve washed and dried your clothes, grab a metal or wire clothing hanger. Before you put your clothes on, gently glide the metal hanger over your clothes. The metal discharges the electricity and removes the static. When you go to hang your clothing, hang clothing that is sticking and clinging with a metal hanger.[1]
You can also pass a metal hanger in between your skin and your clothes after putting the clothes on.
This works particularly well with delicate fabrics, like silk. However, metal wire hangers can distort some clothing items, like heavy sweaters. If you think that your clothing may be damaged by a wire hanger, simply run the hanger over the surface of the fabric before storing your item some other way.
Hide a safety pin inside of your clothes to absorb static. Take a metal safety pin and turn your clothing inside out. Unlock the pin and slide it through the seam of your clothing so that it’s hidden from the outside. Turn your clothing out to face the right direction and put your clothing on. The safety pin will absorb any static electricity.[2]It doesn’t matter if you’re removing your clothes from the dryer, closet, or dresser. The pin will still work to remove static cling.
Avoid placing the pin on the front or near an exposed hem, since others will be able to see it if you do.
Run a metal thimble or brush over the fabric. Running a metal object across your clothing discharges the static electricity. After drying your clothes, put a metal thimble on your finger. Run the finger across the surface of every clothing item to reduce the static charge. You can use a metal-bristled brush instead of a thimble if you prefer, although this may not be the best choice if your fabric could snag on the bristles.[3]As with other tricks involving metal, the idea is to discharge the electrical charge to prevent static. Touching any metal object will accomplish the same goal if you do not have a metal thimble.
Drag a metal object over the shirt to gather electrical charge. If you don’t have a thimble, brush, hanger, or pin, any metal object will successfully remove an electrical charge. A fork, spoon, bowl, gear, screwdriver, or any other object will work so long as it’s made of metal. Make sure that your metal object is clean before running it over your clothes.[4][Edit]Spraying Your Clothes
Spritz your clothes with hairspray to remove static. Grab any can of hairspray. Stand away from your clothing and spray it with the hairspray for 3-4 seconds. This will lightly cover the clothing in the hairspray without soaking it. Hairspray is specially formulated to combat static in your hair, but the same chemicals will prevent static cling from occurring on your clothes.[5]Do this immediately before you wear your clothes so that the hairspray doesn’t have time to wear off or dissipate.
Hairspray won’t normally stain your fabric, but it may leave a residue behind. If you’re worried about staining or damaging your clothing item, turn it inside-out before spraying the hair product on to your clothes.
Spray a fabric conditioner on your clothes to minimize cling. Mix 1-part of liquid fabric softener with 30-parts water and fill an empty spray bottle with the ingredients. Shake the bottle to mix the ingredients together. Stand away from your clothing and mist your clothing for 4-5 seconds. This will minimize the effect of static cling on your clothing. Do this right before you’re going to put your clothes on for the best results.[6]Most fabric softeners won’t stain your clothing, especially when it is diluted with water. If you’re worried about staining your clothes, turn the clothing inside-out before spritzing it.
Stain removers and wrinkle removers will usually work just as well.
Mist your dried clothes lightly with water. Fill an empty spray bottle with lukewarm tap water. Stand away from your clothing and spritz it 4-5 times while standing . Spray enough water to mist your clothing without soaking it or making it damp. The water will neutralize the static charges that cause cling to occur.[7]Do this right before you put your clothing item on for the best results.[Edit]Adjusting the Wash Cycle
Add of baking soda to your wash cycle. Baking soda will function the same way as fabric conditioner to absorb the electrical charges as your clothes wash. Before you start your wash cycle, pour of baking soda into the drum of the washer. Add your standard detergent and wash your clothes as you normally do.[8]If you plan on machine drying your clothes, some of the charge may come back after the baking soda has been washed out. This method works best when used in conjunction with another way of removing static. You may not need to use another method if you air dry your clothes instead of machine-drying them, though.
For smaller loads with less than of clothing, feel free to decrease the amount of baking soda to .
Baking soda effectively creates a barrier around each garment, preventing negative and positive charges from building up and causing the garments to stick together.
Baking soda has the added benefit of neutralizing odors.
Sprinkle of white vinegar into your rinse cycle. After the washing machine completes its initial wash cycle, pause the machine and pour of distilled white vinegar over your clothes. Restart the machine and allow it to continue its rinse cycle. Vinegar softens fabrics, preventing them from becoming too stiff and dry. This also helps to reduce the amount of static build-up.[9]Do not use vinegar with bleach. These ingredients produce a noxious gas when they’re combined. Do not use this method with the baking soda, although it’s fine if you want to use tinfoil and fabric softener.
If you don’t want your clothes to smell like white vinegar, soak a washcloth in the vinegar instead and add that to the rinse cycle. The odor shouldn’t be too overwhelming, even if you add the vinegar straight to the rinse water.
If you have a softener dispenser in your machine, you can pour the vinegar inside at the start of the entire cycle. Adding vinegar to your clothing also results in brighter colors and cleaner whites.
White vinegar works best, but in a pinch, you can use apple cider vinegar. You may not want to use apple cider vinegar on white or lightly-colored clothing, though.
Throw a ball of tinfoil into the washing machine with your clothes. Take a sheet of tinfoil and crumple it up into a small ball. Pack it tightly by squeezing it between both of your hands over and over. Add your ball of tinfoil to your washer and run your normal cycle. The tinfoil discharges positive and negative charges that the washing machine produces.[10]You can use tinfoil along with any other method, although you should avoid mixing baking soda and vinegar in your washing machine.
Use fabric softener to prevent charges from building up. Liquid fabric softener helps prevent static from building up during the wash cycle. Add of liquid softener to your standard cycle per your softener’s instructions. As wet clothes are tossed around in the washer, they build up an electrical charge that causes them to stick together. Fabric softeners contain chemicals designed to stop that electricity from building.[11]Softener sheets work the same way as fabric softener. Get sheets if you want to avoid messy liquids. Softener sheets are typically added to the dryer, though.
You can use fabric softener alongside any other method in this section.[Edit]Drying Your Clothing
Add a dryer ball to your dryer before adding your wet clothes. Dryer balls will work the exact same way as the sheets or fabric softener. They are designed to soften clothes without the use of chemicals. Add 1-2 dryer balls to your machine when you transfer your wet clothes to the dryer and run your dryer cycle as you normally do.[12]Dryer balls also minimize the amount of contact fabrics have with one another in the machine. Electrical charges build up in fabric as one piece rubs up against another, so minimizing this contact also minimizes static.
Add a damp washcloth to the last 10 minutes of the drying cycle. When your drying cycle has 10 minutes remaining, pause it. Switch the dryer to the lowest heat setting and throw a clean, damp washcloth into the machine. Turn the cycle back on and finish it. The water will absorb some of the electrical charges from the dryer and encourage clothes to remain soft and cling-free.[13]This is essentially the same thing as misting your clothes with water after they dry.
Shake your clothes when removing them from the dryer. As you remove each item of clothing from your dryer, give them 2-3 quick shakes. This prevents static from setting in as your clothes are placed on another surface.
This only works if you take your clothes out immediately after they’ve finished drying.
Air dry your clothes to avoid static altogether. Instead of running your clothes through the machine, dry them by hanging them on a clothesline or closet rod. Take each item out of the machine after it has finished washing and hang it on the line or rod with a hanger or clothespins. Alternatively, you can run the dryer through half of a cycle to partially dry your clothes and then air dry them for the remainder of the time.[14]A good portion of the electrical build-up responsible for static cling occurs when wet clothes are completely dried out using heat. Air drying prevents clothing from becoming extremely dry, which also prevents it from developing too much of an electrical charge.
For an added layer of cling removal, hang your clothes on metal hangers to air dry them.[Edit]Making Simple Daily Adjustments
Moisturize your skin to keep clothes from sticking. Any kind of moisturizing lotion will work to remove static cling. Before putting your clothes on, rub moisturizer into your legs, torso, and arms. Work it into your skin until there are no visible globs of lotion remaining. Moisturizer will dispel static as your clothes absorb it from your skin.[15]By moisturizing your skin, you remove dryness that would otherwise attract a highly-charged fabric.
You can rub lotion over your hands before removing laundry from the dryer or folding your clothes. This will prevent excess electrical charge from transferring from your hands to the fabric.
Use a moisturizing conditioner to maintain your hairstyle. If static cling from your clothing is causing your hair to become frizzy, get a moisturizing conditioner or hair product. When you shower, rub the conditioner through your hair after shampooing. If you’re using a moisturizing hair product, dry your hair and work the product through each section of your hair before styling it.[16]Silicone-based conditioners will help keep static away from your hair more effectively, but there’s a lot of debate over whether silicone is good for your hair or not.
Moisturizing your hair will keep your hair from drying out. Dry hair is prone to attracting static electricity, which is what causes static cling.
Swap your rubber-soled shoes out for a leather pair. Most shoes have rubber soles. This presents a problem with static though, since static charges can build up in rubber. If you find your clothes developing static cling throughout the day, swap your shoes out for a pair of leather-soled shoes.[17]Wearing leather shoes will help you stay grounded since leather does not build up electrical charge as easily as rubber.[Edit]Tips
If you find yourself constantly dealing with static cling, put a humidifier in the room where you wash and dry your clothes. The humidity will help resolve the problem by reducing the electrical charge in the dry air.[18]
Synthetic fabrics are more likely to develop static cling than natural fibers, like cotton or wool.[19][Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Using Metal to Remove Static
Metal hanger
Metal brush or thimble
Safety pin[Edit]Spraying Your Clothes
Spray bottle
Fabric softener
Water
Hairspray[Edit]Adjusting the Wash Cycle
Fabric softener
Baking soda
White vinegar[Edit]Drying Your Clothing
Tinfoil
Dryer balls[Edit]Making Simple Daily Adjustments
Leather shoes
Hair moisturizer
Conditioner
Moisturizing lotion[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/house-and-home/household-advice/a675616/how-to-remove-static-in-clothes/

↑ https://time.com/4602265/static-electricity-shock-cling/

↑ https://time.com/4602265/static-electricity-shock-cling/

↑ https://time.com/4602265/static-electricity-shock-cling/

↑ https://sciencing.com/rid-static-cling-office-5091165.html

↑ https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/house-and-home/household-advice/a675616/how-to-remove-static-in-clothes/

↑ https://time.com/4602265/static-electricity-shock-cling/

↑ https://www.cnet.com/how-to/stop-using-fabric-softener-or-dryer-sheets/

↑ https://www.cnet.com/how-to/stop-using-fabric-softener-or-dryer-sheets/

↑ https://www.cnet.com/how-to/use-a-ball-of-aluminum-foil-to-eliminate-static-in-the-dryer/

↑ https://sciencing.com/rid-static-cling-office-5091165.html

↑ https://www.ecowatch.com/7-green-ways-to-ditch-that-static-cling-without-resorting-to-toxic-dry-1881878753.html

↑ https://time.com/4602265/static-electricity-shock-cling/

↑ https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/house-and-home/household-advice/a675616/how-to-remove-static-in-clothes/

↑ https://time.com/4602265/static-electricity-shock-cling/

↑ https://www.self.com/story/static-hair

↑ https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/how-to-avoid-getting-shocked-by-static-electricity-during-winter/70003963

↑ https://sciencing.com/rid-static-cling-office-5091165.html

↑ https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/house-and-home/household-advice/a675616/how-to-remove-static-in-clothes/

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Today in History for 22nd November 2019

Historical Events

1914 – Ypres, Belgium, burned by German bombing
1928 – “Bolero” by Maurice Ravel first performed publicly (Paris)
1931 – Ferde Grofe’s “Grand Canyon Suite” premieres
1967 – USSR performs nuclear test at Eastern Kazakh/Semipalitinsk USSR
1981 – SD Charger Dan Fouts passes for 6 touchdowns vs Oakland (55-21)
2005 – Angela Merkel becomes the first female Chancellor of Germany

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1913 – Cecilia Muñoz-Palma, first female Philippine Supreme Court Justice (d. 2006)
1950 – Little Steven, [Van Zandt], Asbury Park NJ, rocker (Born to Run)
1958 – Jamie Lee Curtis, American actress (Halloween, True Lies), born in Los Angeles, California
1961 – Mariel Hemingway, Ketchum Id, actress (Personal Best, Civil Wars)
1966 – Brian Robbins, American actor (Eric-Head of the Class), born in Brooklyn, New York
1978 – Karen O [Orzolek], American singer (Yeah Yeah Yeahs), born in Busan, South Korea

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1318 – Mikhail Yaroslavich, Russian prince (b. 1271)
1782 – John de Mol, porcelein manufacturer, dies
1920 – Manuel Pérez y Curis, Uruguayan poet (b. 1884)
1982 – Max Deutsch, Austrian-French composer, dies at 90
1983 – Michael Conrad, American actor (Delvecchio, Hill St Blues), dies of cancer at 58
1998 – Stu Unger, American poker player (b. 1953)

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How to Write a Check

Writing checks is an easy and important skill every adult should know. To write a check, fill in the current date on the line in the upper right corner, the name of the recipient in the “Pay” field, the numerical amount next to the dollar sign ($), and the written form of the same amount on the line beneath; sign the check on the bottom right line and consider adding a “memo” about the check’s purpose on the lower left line. The more often you write checks, the more natural the process will become.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Annotated Check
WH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5dd7482a0f62f’)Sample Annotated Check
[Edit]Writing a Check
Write the date on the line in the upper right-hand corner. There will be a blank space next to or above the word “Date.” Remember that a check is a legal document, and the date written here should always be the day that you sign the bottom of the check.[1]
Write the name of the recipient. Write the name of the person or company you’re sending the check to next to the line that says “Pay to the Order of.” If it’s a company and you’re not sure exactly what it’s called, make sure you get that information right before you write the check. You can also just pay the check to “Cash,” but be careful, because that means that anyone can cash it.[2]
If it’s to an individual, include both their first and last names. If they are a ‘Jr.’ or a ‘Sr.’ you should include this as well.
If the check is going to an organization, write out its full name. Do not use acronyms unless explicitly given permission.
Write the amount of the check to the right of the dollar sign. Write the exact amount, using dollars and cents. If the check is for twenty dollars, write “20.00.”
Write the monetary amount of the check in word form below the “Pay to the Order of” line. Make sure you also express the number of cents if there are cents, or write “even” at the end of the amount so that another person doesn’t add more money to the amount. If you’ve written a check for $20.00, write either “Twenty dollars and 0/100 cents,” “Twenty dollars even,” or just “Twenty” with a line running all the way from the right of the word to the end of the line.[3]
Sign the check on the line in the bottom right corner. Your check will be invalid if it is not personally signed.[4]
Fill out the memo section on the bottom left of the check. Though this part of the check is optional, it can be helpful to write a note to yourself or the recipient to remember what the check is for. You can write “For May rent” if you’re sending a rent check. Also, many companies or landlords require that you provide some other information in the memo section; some companies require you to write your ID number in the “Memo” section, and if you’re writing a rent check for your apartment, you should write the apartment # right in the memo section.[5][Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
Always draw a line if there is still space after you write your amount in word form. This will prevent someone writing in an additional few zeros.
Always sign your name the same way.
Always use a pen in a dark color such as blue or black. Gel pens are recommended because ink removing liquids do not work as well with the gel.
If you’re writing a check that you don’t want to be cashed until a certain day, write the day that you’d like it to be cashed. For example, if you’re writing a rent check early but don’t want it cashed until the first of the month, write that date on the check. Note, however, post dating won’t guarantee that the recipient will not be able to cash the check before the date written on the check
When you write the amount of the check in the little box, make sure you write it as close to the dollar sign as possible. Forgers will try to sneak in an extra digit.[6]
Always make sure you use the correct date. If you don’t know the date, guess an earlier one. You can postdate a check, but not everyone will accept them. [7][Edit]Warnings
Make sure your check is written out correctly with the correct spelling of the name and the correct amount of money due to that person.
When tearing the check from your checkbook, be sure to tear as cleanly as possible. The printed numbers along the bottom of the check, called the MICR line, are necessary for cashing or depositing the check; so is the check number, usually located in the top right near the date. If any of these numbers are partially torn off, the check will be rendered invalid.
Remember that post-dated checks can be deposited immediately. The date is used to determine when a check becomes stale and will be refused by the bank (typically 7 years after the date unless otherwise specified), not the earliest date that the check can be cashed. A lot of people have been burned by unscrupulous people promising to hold onto checks until the specified date(s).[Edit]Things You’ll Need
A bank checking account
A book of checks
A pen[Edit]Related wikiHows
File Bankruptcy in the United States
Balance a Checkbook
Write a Check on a US Bank to a Canadian Payee
Earn and Save Money[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.themint.org/teens/writing-a-check.html

↑ https://www.immihelp.com/newcomer/writing-a-check-tips.html

↑ https://comptroller.texas.gov/taxes/file-pay/check.php

↑ https://www.huntington.com/Personal/checking/checks/how-to-write-a-check

↑ https://www.investopedia.com/university/banking/banking3.asp

↑ http://www.lawfirms.com/resources/criminal-defense/criminal-offense/check-fraud.htm

↑ http://www.legalmatch.com/law-library/article/postdated-checks.html

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