How to Increase Blood Flow to the Brain

The brain uses about three times as much oxygen as the muscles do. Oxygen is vital to brain function, and brain healing. Optimal brain function relies on a healthy blood flow. There are a number of different methods you can use to increase the amount of oxygen-rich blood that flows to your brain.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Exercising to Increase Blood Flow
Exercise regularly. All aerobic activity has positive effects on circulation and health. One research study concluded that moderate exercise improves blood circulation to the brain in older women.[1] Walk for 30–50 minutes at a brisk rate of speed, three or four times per week.
The results of the study indicated as much as 15% higher blood flow to the brain.
Many studies suggest a connection between exercise and overall brain health, though there’s no definitive research suggesting that that increased blood flow may prevent or reverse cognitive decline.
Aerobic activity is any physical activity that causes you to breathe harder, and raises your heart rate. Swimming, bicycling, dancing, and even sex are all aerobic activities. Find one that best suits your lifestyle, and engage in it with enthusiasm!
Take short walks throughout the day. It’s not necessary to commit to a lengthy exercise session to reap the benefits of walking. Taking short walks will also help increase the blood flow to your brain. Even a walk of three to five minutes will have a positive effect on your blood’s circulation.
Use a timer throughout your day to remind yourself to take walking breaks. If you work at a desk, schedule short walks.
Take advantage of naturally occurring opportunities to walk. Take the stairs instead of the elevator. Park at a distance from your destination. Get off the bus or train before your exit, and walk the remainder of the route.
Stretch during the day. Stretching improves overall circulation, and prevents stiffness in the joints and muscles.[2]Set aside a few minutes every hour to stretch your body.
Stretching increases blood flow to the muscles. While it’s not possible to truly “stretch” your brain, by enhancing blood flow throughout your body, circulation will improve and increase.[3]
Simple stretches that result in increased blood flow to the brain include touching your knees or toes from a standing position. Alternatively, sit on a clean area with your legs outstretched, and touch your knees, shins or toes from this seated position. Be careful not to do anything that causes pain or discomfort in your back.
Do yoga. Yoga poses often encourage putting the head below the heart. This directly benefits blood flow to the brain.[4] Simple inversions include simply laying on the floor, perpendicular to a wall. Scoot your body forward so that your legs are resting on the wall, and your buttocks is close to or touching the wall.
More advanced inversions include raising your body above your head in a headstand or handstand. You may practice doing this by using a wall to help your balance. Remember, yoga should never be painful. Work with a trained yoga practitioner for more advanced inversions.
Inversions don’t have to be vertical. Plow pose and fish pose are both poses that directly benefit the blood flow to the brain. Plow pose stimulates the thyroid, increasing blood flow to the brain. Fish pose stimulates the neck, throat and brain.[Edit]Using the Breath to Improve Blood Flow
Breathe through your nose. Engage your diaphragm, in your abdominal area. This is also called “belly breathing.” Breathing deeply moves the air and oxygen down into the lower areas of the lungs where most of the circulation of blood is.
Air entering through the nose enters the sinus cavities, oral cavities, and the upper part of the lungs. Breathing through the mouth will lessen the exposure to freshly oxygenated air.
Breathing with the diaphragm results in more oxygen entering this blood.
Meditate. Heartbeat and breathing slow during meditation. Often, meditation includes more conscious, even guided breathing.[5]Deep, even-paced breathing will increase the saturation of oxygen in the blood.
Conscious breathing helps to relax the shoulders, chest, and neck muscles that may be interfering with blood flow to the brain.
Meditation has had proven positive effects. It lowers a person’s stress levels, increases their ability to focus, and strengthens the immune system.
There are many ways to meditate. An easy way to begin meditation practice is simply to sit comfortably, eyes partially or completely closed, and count your breaths. When you have counted 10 breaths, start over. Continue to focus your entire attention on counting your breaths. When other thoughts enter, simply notice them, and let them go. Start over again at one.
Quit Smoking. Nicotine restrict arteries, which prevents healthy blood flow to the brain. On the other hand, the brain’s oxygen uptake and blood flow decreases by up to 17% immediately after people stop smoking.[6]
Smoking has been linked to strokes and brain aneurysm. An aneurysm is a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall.
E-Cigarettes contain nicotine, which constricts blood vessels and lowers the blood flow to the brain. They are not recommended as a substitute for ordinary cigarettes.[7][Edit]Changing Your Diet
Eat more chocolate. Studies suggest that the flavonoids found in cocoa beans may increase blood flow to the brain.[8] Flavonoids can also be found in red wine, red grapes, apples and berries. Teas, particularly green or white teas, are another excellent source of flavonoids.[9]
Make sure that your overall caloric intake remains within healthy limits. Increasing fat or sugar levels to your daily diet may have negative consequences.
Research on the beneficial effects of flavonoids is still preliminary.
Drink beet juice. Drinking beet juice has been shown to increase blood flow to the brain.[10]Beets contain nitrates, which are converted to nitrites by naturally occurring bacteria in your mouth. Nitrites help to widen blood vessels, and help increase blood flow to the brain.
Nitrates are also found in celery, cabbage, and other green, leafy vegetables.
Eating fruits and vegetables high in nitrates is recommended for optimal brain functioning. Converting these foods into juices is the quickest way to ingest a therapeutic dose.
Include “superfoods” in your daily diet. Nuts, seeds, blueberries, and avocados are sometimes called “superfoods” for their high nutritional value. Research suggests that consuming these foods has a positive effect on maintaining a healthy brain into old age.[11]
Walnuts, pecans, almonds, cashews and other nuts are excellent sources of Vitamin E. Deficits in Vitamin E have been linked to cognitive decline. You can eat them raw or roasted. Unhydrogenated nut butters maintain their high nutritional content.
Avocados are high in monounsaturated fat, which has been linked to increased blood flow to the brain. Monounsaturated fat helps to reduce bad cholesterol from the blood, and leads to lower blood pressure.[12] Avocados also provide nutrients to help improve your overall health.
Blueberries help protect the brain from oxidative stress, which deteriorates brain functioning. Eating one cup a day of blueberries — fresh, dried, or frozen — has been shown to increase brain functioning.
Consider nutritional supplements. Ginkgo Biloba has long been used to increase blood flow to the brain. Ginkgo also protects the nerve cells that are thought to be damaged in Alzheimers.
Ginkgo should not be given to children. Studies done using ginkgo with adults have ranged between 120–-240 mg per day.
Ginkgo is available in tablets, capsules, liquid extracts, and dried leaves for herbal tisanes.[Edit]Video
[Edit]Related wikiHows
Increase Blood Flow
Prevent Swelling in Hot Weather
Get Rid of Bruises
Prevent Nose Bleeds[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.the-aps.org/mm/hp/Audiences/Public-Press/Archive/2011/9.html

↑ http://www.healthyandnaturalworld.com/improve-blood-circulation-naturally/

↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/fitness/in-depth/stretching/art-20047931?pg=2

↑ http://healthyliving.azcentral.com/yoga-postures-increase-blood-flow-brain-4550.html

↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/meditation/in-depth/meditation/art-20045858?pg=2

↑ http://www.nhs.uk/smokefree/why-quit/smoking-health-problems

↑ http://health.clevelandclinic.org/2014/09/e-cigarettes-tobacco-free-but-your-heart-may-still-be-at-risk/

↑ http://www.medsci.org/press/cocoa.html

↑ http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/dietary-factors/phytochemicals/flavonoids

↑ http://www.webmd.com/brain/news/20101103/beet-juice-good-for-brain

↑ http://www.webmd.com/diet/eat-smart-healthier-brain

↑ http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyEating/Monounsaturated-Fats_UCM_301460_Article.jsp

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Today in History for 24th November 2019

Historical Events

1914 – Benito Mussolini leaves Italy’s socialist party
1942 – French collaborator Marquis de Brinon establishes “African Falanx”
1949 – Syracuse Nationals beat Anderson Packers, 125-123 in 5 OTs
1970 – 36th Heisman Trophy Award: Jim Plunkett, Stanford (QB)
1986 – Cards reliever Todd Worrell wins NL Rookie of Year
2008 – Craig David releases his first Greatest Hits album

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1884 – Michel de Klerk, architect (Amsterdam School)
1916 – Forrest J Ackerman, invented the term “sci-fi”
1934 – Claudio Prieto, composer
1940 – Paul Tagliabue, commissioner (NFL)
1968 – Bülent Korkmaz, Turkish footballer
1970 – Marlon James, Jamaican writer (A Brief History of Seven Killings), born in Kingston, Jamaica

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1807 – Joseph Brant [Thayendanegea], Mohawk leader, dies at 64
1840 – Cornelis RT Krayenhoff, fortress architect/cartographer, dies at 82
1916 – Sir Hiram Stevens Maxim, American-born gunsmith (b. 1840)
1946 – Alfonso Broqua, Uruguayan composer, dies at 70
1984 – Godfrey Ridout, Canadian composer, dies at 66
2009 – Samak Sundaravej, 25th Prime Minister of Thailand (2008), dies at 74

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Make Slime

Slime is always popular with the kids and the reason is simple––because it’s a lot of fun! It’s cheap, easy, and can even be made by younger kids with the right care and supervision. As well as being fun, it’s a tactile way to relieve stress. Pick one of the four ways below to make slime, each one different to match your time availability and budget.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Making Basic Slime
Mix borax powder and warm water together. Measure out borax powder and warm water. Add these ingredients to a large mixing bowl. Stir the mixture until the borax is completely dissolved.
Add of water and 1 cup of glue to a separate mixing bowl.
Add food coloring to the glue mixture (optional). Choose any color food coloring you like! Feel free to experiment with any color. Start with a few drops of food coloring, then stir. If you want the color to be brighter, add a few more drops of the food coloring. If you add a lot, the color may end up pretty dark and when you play with it, the color will dye your hands.You can also separate the glue mixture evenly into smaller bowls and make each one a different color, then mix them together.
Combine the two mixtures. Dump the borax mixture slowly and a small bit at a time, because if you add too much, your slime will be hard and rip not stretch! Stir them together until it becomes your desired consistency, and doesn’t stick to your hand. You will see the slime begin to form!If you chose to make smaller amounts of slime in separate containers, evenly divide the borax solution among the containers.
Start kneading the slime with your hands at this point. It might be sticky, but keep mixing. Add more activator (borax) if needed.
Take the slime out and have fun! If it is too sticky, add more of the borax and water mixture until it gets to a texture that you like. [Edit]Making “Living” Slime
Mix cornstarch with vegetable oil. Add both ingredients to a large bowl. Stir them together thoroughly.[1]
Put the mixture in the refrigerator. Place the bowl in the refrigerator and leave it there until the mixture is fully chilled (about one hour). The cold temperature will help the slime solidify and reach the ideal consistency.[2]
Remove the mixture from the refrigerator. Stir it well (as the ingredients will have separated again). Let the mixture warm up just enough so that it flows slightly.
Find a block of styrofoam. It can really be any size but the standard size is 1x6x6 inches (25x150x150mm). Run the styrofoam on your hair or on your carpet several times to give it a static charge.[3]
Pour the slime mixture out slowly into another container. Place the piece of styrofoam just in front of the slime before you start pouring. It should be about 1 inch (25 mm) away from the flow of slime. The static electricity will cause the slime to stop flowing and appear to take on a life of its own.[4]Wiggle the styrofoam around and the slime should follow it. Your kids will be amazed![Edit]Making Edible Slime
Pour a can of sweetened condensed milk into a pan. Place the pan on your stove top. Add of cornstarch to the milk and stir until the ingredients are well-combined.[5]
Heat the mixture over low heat. Set your burner to low and continue to stir the mixture constantly as it heats up. If you don’t stir continuously, the mixture may stick to your pan.[6]
Remove the mixture from the heat when it has thickened. As it heats up, the slime will become more gelatinous and harder to stir. Once it reaches that point, remove the pan from the heat.[7]
Add 10 to 15 drops of food coloring to the mixture. You can choose any color that you want! Green is always a classic, but experiment or allow your kids to pick a color.[8]
Allow the mixture to cool. Before you let your kids play with (and eat) it, let it cool down completely. The slime may stain surfaces, so make sure it’s kept away from anything that stains easily or that you want to keep unstained, especially light colored objects.[9][Edit]Making Soap Flake Slime
Mix soap flakes with hot water. Carefully add the hot water to a large bowl. Measure out the soap flakes and place them into the container. Stir thoroughly until the flakes fully dissolve.
Add a few drops of food coloring (if desired). Food coloring is optional, but it may make the slime more fun!
Let the mixture stand for up to an hour. This will allow the mixture to reach the desired consistency.
Beat the mixture vigorously with a spoon. It will begin to froth up as you beat it. It has reached the right consistency when it pours easily and becomes extremely slimy to touch.
Keep the slime in an airtight container. This slime keeps very well in an airtight container. Make sure you store it away from direct sunlight and heat.[Edit]Tips
If you’re keen to make a glittery or many-colored slime, see How to Make Unicorn Slime.
When you put food coloring in the slime mix, take care to avoid getting it on yourself. Mix it well.
Don’t have food coloring? Use watercolor paints or marker for color!
If you add shaving cream it, it makes the slime “fluffy”.
If you don’t want to use borax you can use liquid starch, aka “sta-flo” it’s safe and clear. It is also very cheap (about $3) and you can get it at family dollar and Walmart.
If you make any sort of slime (holo, fluffy, crunchy etc.), always put it in a container so it doesn’t dry out.
Don’t use too much borax solution. This will make the slime turn rubbery and tear easily.
When choosing your glue, make sure that it is a PVA-based glue.
If you don’t want to use the borax solution to activate the slime, adding baking soda and contact lens or eye drops are a good substitute. Just make sure the contact lens solution or the eye drops have boric acid in the ingredients list or else it won’t work.
You can add essential oils or scented liquid soap to the slime to make it smell nice.
The recipe can be modified by varying the proportions of ingredients. For example, if 2 parts borax solution are used, the slime that forms is “harder” and less gooey.
If you are making your slime with detergent, be sure to use non-organic detergent.
After you make your slime, do not put it on any fabric or carpet and let it dry. Otherwise, it can stain the fabric.
Don’t add too much food coloring as it can get all over your hands and clothes.
If you have sensitive skin, you might not want to use borax as it can cause burns and irritation.
Lotion can also make it more stretchy if the slime is thick and hard to stretch. The more lotion you add, the more stretchy it will become. Just be careful because the lotion also makes the slime very sticky. Add a little at a time.
This solution is best enjoyed on the day of creating it. The slime will gather fluff, dust, and particles that make it unpleasant to keep. However, if you do wish to store it, label it well to avoid any confusion as to what it is and keep in a cool place.
Add contact lens solution to make your slime less sticky.
If the slime gets on your clothes, you can wash them. The slime should come off easily.
Elmer’s glue is one suitable brand of glue. It is more generally known as polyvinyl acetate.
If your slime is too tough, add drops of glycerin to make it softer.
If your slime is sticky add more borax and water into it.
When you are done playing with your slime, put it in a container or bag and store at room temperature.
If you need to clean slime off clothing, furniture, carpet, etc., check out wikiHow’s article for help: How to Clean Slime.
You can use contact lens solution mixed with a pinch of bicarbonate or soda (but only add a little bit) and mix it in. If you add paint for colour be aware; it will come out the pot watery after letting it sit, but it still makes slime.
Make sure to wash your hands after touching slime with borax.[Edit]Warnings
Make sure your kids don’t get the slime on areas where it’ll stain or damage the surface (ceiling, walls, carpet, furniture, etc.).
Keep the slime away from pets and very small children.
Do not consume any slime or slime ingredients unless it is edible slime.
Don’t add too much borax, as the slime will turn into a clump.
Borax is a detergent that can cause 1st, 2nd, and/or 3rd-degree burns. Wear gloves or gloves and safety goggles, and exercise caution when handling borax.
If you add color to the slime, it may stain things.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Basic Slime
of craft glue
of warm water
Food coloring (optional)
borax powder[Edit]”Living” Slime
cornstarch
vegetable oil
A piece of styrofoam[Edit]Edible Slime
1 can (14 oz.) of sweetened condensed milk
of cornstarch
10-15 drops of food coloring[Edit]Soap Flake Slime
soap flakes
hot water
Food coloring (optional)
[Edit]Related wikiHows
Make Slime
Remove Sticky Substances from Fabric
Make Slime Without Borax
Make Fluffy Slime
Make Rainbow Slime[Edit]References
__ Methods __

[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://bizarrelabs.com/slime.htm

↑ http://bizarrelabs.com/slime.htm

↑ http://bizarrelabs.com/slime.htm

↑ http://bizarrelabs.com/slime.htm

↑ http://craftbits.com/project/edible-kids-slime/

↑ http://craftbits.com/project/edible-kids-slime/

↑ http://craftbits.com/project/edible-kids-slime/

↑ http://craftbits.com/project/edible-kids-slime/

↑ http://craftbits.com/project/edible-kids-slime/

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