How to Introduce the Elf on a Shelf

The Elf on the Shelf is a fun way to get your kids even more excited for the Christmas season while reminding them that Santa is watching. However, introducing the elf can be tricky! To get your kids familiar with the Elf on the Shelf, plan a day to explain everything about their new gift from Santa.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Getting a Delivery from Santa
Pick a date when you’d like the elf to start appearing. Normally, the elf can show up as early as early November to keep an eye on the kids for the Christmas season. Some elves start coming on December 1st, to get kids in the mood for Christmas and remind them that Santa is watching!
A good rule of thumb is to start the elf when you put up the Christmas tree for the year.
Keep in mind that the elf has to come every day until Christmas Eve. If you forget or miss a day, you’ll have to come up with a reason for why the elf didn’t move.
Come up with a name for your elf. Having a name for your elf can make it seem like a member of the family. Make sure you introduce the elf by its name and encourage your kids to call it that while it’s there. Soon, they’ll be excited to see their elf every morning.[1]
You can make your name something festive and Christmas-themed, like Jingle, or a common name, like Jeff. It’s up to you as the parent!
Stage the first appearance. Have the elf appear one morning in an open place where you know your kids will see it, such as the kitchen or living room. Keep it simple for the first morning, and ask your kid what they know about elves. They might surprise you with what they already know about your family’s new friend![2]
For example, you can have the elf sitting on the dining room table or couch with its book, waiting for your kids when they wake up.[Edit]Explaining What the Elf Does
Write a letter from Santa to arrive with the elf. This letter can explain what the elf does, how long it’s going to be staying, and set some rules for the kids. For example, you can have Santa tell them that kids aren’t allowed to touch the elf, that the elf comes every day until Christmas, and that it reports back to Santa in the North Pole every night.[3]
You can also have the letter be written by the elf instead of Santa. That way, the elf can “talk” directly to the kids and let them know what’s going on! However, hearing the rules from Santa, who they respect, might be more effective for some kids.
If you have more than one kid, you can write individual letters or just have one letter for the whole house.
Read the Elf on the Shelf book with your kids. The book does a great job of explaining where the elf comes from, and where it goes every night. Sit down with them in the morning that the elf comes and read the book together, or have your kid practice their reading out loud.[4]
The book is aimed for kids ages 5, 6, and 7 to read aloud.
There’s also a movie, called An Elf’s Story: The Elf on the Shelf, that tells the backstory of the elf and might be more engaging for your kids if they don’t like reading.
Answer any questions your kids have about the elf. Be prepared for questions! This new member of your family is fun and exciting, but kids are smart and can be skeptical at first. They might have questions about why your family got an elf, or why they’ve seen the elf in the store.[5]
If your kid has friends who don’t have an elf, you can tell them that there’s a long list of families who are waiting to get an elf, and you guys were lucky enough to get one this year.
To explain why the elf can be bought in the store, tell them that elves can be bought in the store for families who don’t get them from Santa. However, let them know that your specific elf is special because it was a gift from Santa.
[Edit]Moving the Elf
Position the elf in the Christmas tree, hanging onto an ornament. This is a quick, easy idea for a night when you might have less time. The elf has velcro hands, so you can have the elf hanging from a higher branch of the tree near an ornament as if it were trying to help decorate.
Placing it about mid-way up the tree will keep the kids from reaching it, but will ensure that they’re still able to see the elf in the morning.
Set up the elf to “play” with other toys. If your kids have a favourite doll or action figure, set up a scene where they’re playing dress up, having a tea party, or fighting crime together. Doll-sized cars and trucks are also great for setting up “racing” scenes between the elf and other toys.
If you’re stumped with how to set up the scene, you could position the elf climbing into or out of a toy box or dollhouse to make it seem like it was just hanging out with the other toys!
Create a stuffed animal parade with the elf at the front. Stuffed animals are great for making creative scenes with the elf. Have the elf “ride” a larger animal like an elephant or dog, and make an animal parade by setting up other stuffed animals in a row behind them!
If you’re having trouble getting the elf to sit upon the animal, try having them lean forward and hold onto the animal with the velcro on their hands.
Set up a Christmas countdown involving the elf. If you get the elf started early, you can start a Christmas countdown by using small treats like chocolate to spell out the number of days until Christmas. You can make it look like the elf set out the treats, or have a few chocolate wrappers surrounding the elf—like it ate some of the treats!
You don’t have to do this every night, but you can do it on major milestones like 1 month, 12 days, or 1 week until Christmas!
Use packets of hot cocoa and a cocktail umbrella in a cake pan to make a “beach”. Sprinkle 3-4 packets of hot cocoa mix into the pan to coat the bottom. Then, position the elf in the pan to lounge along the side. Remember to place the umbrella next to the elf to shade it from the sun!
If you don’t have a hot cocoa mix, you can use crushed graham crackers or brown sugar instead.
Use a round cake pan to create a smaller beach, or cookie sheet for a bigger one. You can get as creative as you want with a beach towel, doll-sized surfboard, or a mini drink for the elf![Edit]Tips
Most children who are old enough to know the story of Santa will also be excited by the elf. If your child is still confused about Santa, or doesn’t know the story of Santa, try explaining that to them first.
Plan your first week of elf appearances beforehand so you don’t forget! The first week is important for showing your kids that the elf is really going to come every day and is watching them for Santa.
Set an alarm on your phone every night to remind yourself to move the elf. When things get hectic, it’s easy to forget to do it! An alarm will help you remember to do it quickly before bed.[Edit]References↑ https://bestoflifemag.com/3-ways-introduce-elf-shelf/

↑ https://bestoflifemag.com/3-ways-introduce-elf-shelf/

↑ https://www.midgetmomma.com/time-bring-elf-introduce-elf-shelf-kids/

↑ https://www.midgetmomma.com/time-bring-elf-introduce-elf-shelf-kids/

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Today in History for 1st December 2019

Historical Events

1954 – Nationalist China and US sign dike agreement
1954 – NY Yankees and Baltimore Orioles complete largest trade in MLB history as 17 players, including Don Larsen, Gene Woodling, Bob Turley change teams; first phase of transaction began November 18 and concludes today after the MLB draft
1986 – Musée d’Orsay opens in Paris
1988 – Benazir Bhutto named 1st female Prime Minister of a Muslim country (Pakistan)
2007 – Davis Cup Tennis, Portland, Oregan: Bob and Mike Bryan team to give US an unassailable 3-0 lead (ends 4-1) over Russia; beat Nikolay Davydenko and Igor Andreev 7-6, 6-4, 6-2; 32nd US title
2017 – President Trump’s former national security adviser Michael Flynn pleads guilty to lying to the F.B.I.

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Famous Birthdays

1912 – Cookie Lavagetto, American baseball third baseman, manager and coach (MLB All Star 1938-41; Brooklyn Dodgers; Washington Senators), born in Oakland, California (d. 1990)
1934 – Hilly Axwijk, Suriname social worker
1958 – Charlene Tilton, American actress (Lucy Ewing – Dallas), born in San Diego, California
1964 – Salvatore Schillaci [Totò], Italian soccer striker (16 caps; Messina, Juventus), born in Palermo, Italy
1966 – Steve Walsh, American NFL quarterback and CFL coach (Chicago Bears, Tampa Bay Buccaneers; Toronto Argonauts), born in Saint Paul, Minnesota
1976 – Brently Heilbron, American satirist

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Famous Deaths

1018 – Thietmar, German chronicler and Bishop of Merseburg, dies at 43
1729 – Giacomo F. Maraldi, French-Italian astronomer and mathematician, dies at 64
1808 – Anton Fischer, composer, dies at 30
1892 – Joseph Lippens, Belgian lieutenant in Congo, murdered
1939 – Max Fiedler, German composer, dies at 79
1943 – Damrong Rajanubhab, Thai prince, son of King Mongkut and brother of King Chulalongkorn and historian, dies at 81

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How to Decorate a Christmas Tree

A decorated Christmas tree makes for a very jolly home during the holidays. Make your home festive by following these easy steps.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Putting the Lights on your Tree
Test your Christmas lights before you hang them on your tree. Plug your Christmas lights into an outlet. Ensure that you don’t have any burnt-out bulbs.
Put lights on your tree. Make sure to do this before putting ornaments on your tree. LED lights are best for live trees as they do not heat up too quickly.[1]The Around-and-Around Wrap: Wrap strands of lights around the top of the tree and work your way down to the base of the tree. For a 6-foot tall tree, you will need about 6 strands of lights with 100 bulbs each.[2]
Put your first light at the very top of the tree to begin. This light will shine on the star, angel, or snowflake that you will add later.
Secure your light strands by weaving them in an out of the tree’s branches.
The Vertical Wrap: Divide your tree into 3 sections. Each section will have its own lights.
Begin at the base of the tree and weave the lights up through the branches to the top of the tree and back down to the base. Repeat.
Connect your light strands to an extension cord and plug it into a nearby outlet.[Edit]Hanging the Ornaments on your Tree
Wrap the base of the tree in plastic. The plastic will collect any needles that fall off your tree. Cover the plastic with a festive Christmas tree skirt.These skirts add to the beauty of your tree and also keep the tree’s needles from collecting on your floor.
Hang your ornaments on the tree. Look for branches that are wider apart so that your ornaments won’t rest on lower branches.
Hang heavier ornaments further up on branches, closer to the trunk of the tree. The tree is strongest near the trunk and can bear more weight.
Hang ornaments near lights to highlight certain ornaments. This works particularly well with shiny bulb, glass, or metal ornaments as these types are the most reflective.
Spread ornaments evenly throughout the tree. Make sure not to hang too many ornaments on each branch.If a branch starts to get too weighed down, ornaments could fall off or the branch could break.
Add additional decorations. These extras can include bows, strands of popcorn and cranberries, and candy canes.
Add tinsel (optional). Tinsel makes your tree glitter. Hang tinsel near lights for the shiniest look possible.
Be mindful with the amount of tinsel you place on your tree. Too much tinsel could take away from the beauty of your ornaments.
For a more modern look, buy colored tinsel rather than the traditional gold and silver.
Add the star (or decoration you wish to have at the top of your tree.) Make sure that it is secure and not crooked.
Turn off the lights in your house. Admire the festive tree you have created and be jolly.[Edit]Gathering Ideas for Themed Christmas Trees
Create a traditional look with solid red, white, silver and gold orbs. The orbs can be glass or plastic.[3]Add fake winterberries and silver bells to complete a traditional tree.
Place silk flowers throughout your tree for a blooming theme. Hang white lights instead of colored lights to accent the flowers.[4]Silk roses, magnolias, and hydrangeas are good options for a wintery feel.
Add richly colored ribbons and little silver orbs or glittering glass ornaments for a twinkling, flowery look.
Create a nature-inspired look with rustic metal or glass ornaments. Place pine cones throughout the tree.[5]
Mix bird ornaments in with fake leaves.
White lights are best for this natural look.
Hang red, white, and blue ornaments for a patriotic look. Mix glass and plastic ornaments alongside white lights for a tree that could rival the White House’s own.[6]
To get even more patriotic, hang red, white, and blue lights on your tree.
Hang large, brightly colored orbs for a more modern look. Mod colors include lime greens, purples, bright blues, and hot pink.[7]Light strands with large light bulbs mixed with bright small and large ornaments will give your tree a contemporary, edgy feel.[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
When buying a live Christmas tree, look for trees that have even branches all the way around. Avoid trees with large bald spots where no branches are growing because you will be able to hang less ornaments (and it will look awkward.)
Craft stores such as Hobby Lobby may have different ornaments that you may like to add to your tree.
Pick colors that complement each other. Blue and silver, red and gold, silver and gold, and purple, gold, and silver, are some color combinations that look great. Combinations like blue and pink, pink and gold, and red and blue may not look work as well on your Christmas tree.[Edit]Warnings
Never hang candles on the tree as they are dangerous and can cause a fire.
Do not overload the power outlets! This is a common occurrence at Christmas time and can lead to a fire.
Make sure you turn off incandescent lights before you go to bed, especially on a live tree. You can unplug the lights or use a timer.
Be careful with broken ornaments. The shards can be very sharp. It is best not to use glass decorations on a tree if you have pets or young children who could break them and get cut.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Christmas tree (live or fake)
Christmas tree stand
Small plastic tarp
Tree skirt
Ornaments
Strings of lights
Beads and extra decorations (optional)
Bows (optional)
Star or other topper to place on the top of the tree.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Store a Christmas Cake
Make a Christmas Cheesecake[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.marthastewart.com/268031/setting-up-a-christmas-tree

↑ http://www.marthastewart.com/268031/setting-up-a-christmas-tree

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