How to Stop Watery Eyes

Watery eyes can be very irritating, and they might be due to anything from allergies to bacterial infections. Regardless of what’s bothering your eyes, there are several things you can do to stop them from watering. Common remedies include removing potential environmental eye irritation triggers, such as dust, pollen, pollution, and makeup, along with washing the skin around your eyes and eyelashes, gently rinsing your eyes with water, using eye drops, and using a warm compress. If these remedies don’t work, see your doctor, who may be able to diagnose and treat the problem. There are also some things that you can do to prevent watery eyes, such as wearing goggles, wearing sunglasses, and wearing your own makeup.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Soothing Irritated Eyes
Flush your eye gently with water if you have a foreign object or debris in it. If you have something stuck in your eye, it may be causing your eye to water. Flush your eye out with water to attempt to remove the object or debris. Hold your eye open under a gentle stream of lukewarm running water. You can also do this in the shower by allowing the water to hit your forehead and holding your eye open as the water runs down your face. Or, you can wash your eye with an eyewash station or an eyecup.[1]
Do not try to pull a foreign object out of your eye with your fingers or tweezers.
Seek medical attention if you’re certain there’s something in your eye and flushing it with water does not work.[2]
Use eye drops or artificial tears if your eyes are dry. Dryness can actually cause your eyes to water more than usual. Eye drops moisten and lubricate the eyes, which may decrease the production of tears. To use eye drops, tilt your head back and pull down your lower eyelid with you fingertip. Hold the eye drop bottle away from your eyes. Do not allow the bottle tip to touch your eyes. Squeeze the bottle to dispense an eye drop into your open eye and repeat 2 to 3 times.[3]
You can purchase eye drops over-the-counter at a drug store.
Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for how often to use eye drops.
Remove your contact lenses if you wear them. If you wear contact lenses and your eyes are watering, try removing your contact lenses. Contacts can make watery eyes worse while also potentially preventing eye drops from working. Talk to your ophthalmologist if you think your contacts might be to blame for your watery eyes.[4]
Follow your eye doctor’s instructions for keeping your contact lenses clean. If you use disposable contact lenses, never wear them more than once. Always dispose of them after use.
Never sleep with your contact lenses in unless your eye doctor says it is okay.
Avoid wearing your contact lenses when swimming or showering.
Make an eye compress to soothe irritated eyes. First, remove any eye makeup you have on, and wash your face and the skin around your eyes. Then, hold a clean washcloth under warm to hot water, and squeeze out the excess water. Lie down or recline in a chair, and lay the washcloth across your closed eyes. Keep the cloth in place for 5 to 10 minutes.[5]
Repeat 3 to 4 times per day to soothe your eyes.
Warm compresses help to remove crust from the eyes while also working to loosen up anything that might be blocking your tear ducts. They also help to reduce the redness and irritation that often comes with watery eyes.[Edit]Getting Help from Your Doctor
Talk to your doctor about antihistamines for watery eyes from allergies. Taking an antihistamine, or allergy pill, can help to reduce eye irritation caused by allergies. Talk to your doctor if you are unsure about whether your watery eyes are the result of allergies and if antihistamines might be helpful for your watery eyes.[6]
The most common antihistamine drug is the capsule form of diphenhydramine, which is taken orally. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for how to take this medication.[7]
Ask your doctor about antibiotics for a bacterial eye infection. If you go to see a doctor about your watery eyes, they may prescribe an antibiotic if they suspect that you have a bacterial eye infection. Bacterial infections respond well to antibiotics; however, if your watery eye is caused by a virus, the doctor might not prescribe any medication and will ask you to wait for a week to see whether the condition improves or not.[8]
The most common antibiotic prescribed for watery eyes is tobramycin. Tobramycin is an antibacterial eye drop drug specifically made for eye infection. Use the medication as directed by your doctor. Usually, this means you apply 1 drop of tobramycin on the affected eye twice a day for 7 days — once in the morning and once in the evening before going to sleep.[9]
Consider the medications you are taking that might cause eye watering. Some medications can cause watery eyes as a side effect. Check the labels of your prescription medications and ask your doctor if you are not sure. If watery eyes is a lasting side effect of a medication you are taking, talk to your doctor about the possibility of switching to something else. Do not stop taking your medication without consulting your doctor first. Some common types of medicine that may cause watery eyes include:[10]
Epinephrine
Chemotherapy drugs
Cholinergic agonists
Some eye drops, such as echothiophate iodide and pilocarpine
Discuss other possible causes of watery eyes with your doctor. There are a wide variety of medical conditions that can cause watery eyes. If you have not been able to determine the cause of your watery eyes, ask for help from your doctor. Some conditions that may cause watery eyes include:[11]
Allergic conjunctivitis
Allergic rhinitis
Blepharitis (inflamed eyelids)
Blocked Tear Duct
Common Cold
Ingrown Eyelashes
Pink Eye
Hay Fever
Sty
Tear duct infection
Talk to your doctor about procedures to treat blocked tear ducts. If you are having frequent problems with watery eyes due to plugged tear ducts, you may need to have an irrigation, intubation, or surgical procedure to clear the blockage. These options would only be required if other methods of clearing the blockage did not work or your watery eyes are chronic. Some options may include:[12]
Punctal dilation. If tears cannot properly drain through the tear duct openings, punctal dilation may be done. The ophthalmologist will apply local anesthesia on the affected eye. An instrument will be used to widen the opening of the tear duct so that the tears can drain properly through it.[13]
Stenting or intubation. In this procedure, the doctor threads a piece of thin tubing through one or both of your tear ducts. The tubing widens the opening of your tear ducts, which makes it easier for tears to drain. The tubes are left in for about 3 months. This procedure may be performed under local or general anesthesia.[14]
Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). DCR is a surgical procedure that may be required if a less invasive method does not work. DCR creates a new channel for tears to drain through. The surgeon uses the existing tear sac in your nose to create the channel. DCR requires local or general anesthesia.[15][Edit]Protecting Your Eyes
Protect your eyes from foreign objects and debris with goggles. Make sure that you wear goggles or other protective eyewear when working with chemicals, power tools, or around lots of airborne particulates, such as sawdust. These materials can become lodged in your eyes and cause your eyes to water. Wearing goggles will also help protect your eyes from large or small objects that might hit you in the eye and cause damage.[16]
You can purchase goggles in a hardware store. Choose a pair that protects your eyes from all sides.
Wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from the sun. Sunglasses shield your eyes from harsh UV rays that can cause your eyes to water. Sunglasses can also act as a shield against particles and other debris that gets swept up by the wind and could potentially blow into your eyes.[17]
Before putting on your sunglasses, make sure that you wipe off any dust that might have collected on them.
Run an air purifier in your home to reduce environmental irritants. An air purifier can help to filter out dust and other potential irritants in the air. Try keeping an air purifier in a central area of your home and running it during the day, or placing an air purifier in your bedroom and running it at night.[18]
This may be especially helpful if you suffer from indoor allergies, such as dust and pet dander.
Cleanse your eyes thoroughly to remove eye makeup or avoid using it. Avoid eyeliner and any eye makeup you apply along the waterline. Applying makeup to these areas of your eyes can irritate your eyes. Also, not cleansing your eyes thoroughly after wearing any kind of eye makeup may result in plugged tear ducts along your lash line.[19]
Use a gentle facial cleanser to wash your face and then wipe your eyes with a washcloth to wipe away any remaining eye makeup.[Edit]Tips
Take care when disposing of tissues or washcloths you have used to wipe your eyes. If you have a bacterial or viral infection, you can spread the infection to someone else if they come in contact with your tissue or washcloth.[Edit]Warnings
If your watery eyes persist, see a doctor. You may have a viral or bacterial infection.
Avoid activities that require good vision, like driving, until your eyes stop watering. Having watery eyes can make vision-oriented activities difficult or even dangerous.
Don’t use perfumes, hair sprays, and other scented aerosol products. These can cause your eyes to water.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Care for Dry Eyes
Avoid Getting Dry Eyes from the Computer
Wash Eyes With Water
Relieve Eye Strain
Comfort a Sore and Itchy Eye
Get Rid of a Red Eye
Get Rid of Pink Eye Fast
Get Rid of a Runny Nose[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid/basics/art-20056645

↑ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/watering-eyes/

↑ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/watering-eyes/

↑ https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/blog/causes-of-eye-watering

↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dry-eyes/basics/lifestyle-home-remedies/con-20024129

↑ https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/blog/causes-of-eye-watering

↑ http://reference.medscape.com/drug/benadryl-nytol-diphenhydramine-343392

↑ https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/blog/causes-of-eye-watering

↑ https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a682660.html

↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/watery-eyes/basics/causes/sym-20050821

↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/watery-eyes/basics/causes/sym-20050821

↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/blocked-tear-duct/basics/treatment/con-20033765

↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/blocked-tear-duct/basics/treatment/con-20033765

↑ http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/blocked-tear-duct/basics/treatment/con-20033765

↑ http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Watering-eye/Pages/Treatment.aspx

↑ https://nei.nih.gov/healthyeyes/eyehealthtips

↑ http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/169397.php

↑ https://health.clevelandclinic.org/itchy-red-eyes-how-to-tell-if-its-allergy-or-infection/

↑ https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/blog/causes-of-eye-watering

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Today in History for 3rd December 2019

Historical Events

741 – St Zachary begins his reign as Catholic Pope succeeding Gregory III
1953 – “In the Jailhouse Now” single recorded by Webb Pierce (Billboard Song of the Year 1955)
1982 – After losing his world welterweight boxing titles to Sugar Ray Leonard, Thomas Hearns wins WBC Super Welterweight crown in a majority points decision over Wilfred Benitez at Superdome, New Orleans
1984 – “Do They Know It’s Christmas” single written by Bob Geldof and Midge Ure and sung by Band Aid is released in the UK
1991 – Muslim Shi’ites release US hostage Alan Steen
2005 – 10th Big 12 Championship Game: #2 Texas beats Colorado, 70-3

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1750 – Johann Franz Xaver Sterkel, German composer, born in Würzburg, Germany (d. 1817)
1838 – Octavia Hill, British reformer, leader of open-space movement, born in London, England (d. 1912)
1880 – Fedor von Bock, German field marshal (d. 1945)
1925 – Ken Funston, South African cricket batsman (18 Tests, top score 92), born in Pretoria, Transvaal, South Africa (d. 2005)
1952 – Benny Hinn, American televangelist
1974 – Charl Willoughby, South African cricket fast bowler (2 Tests; 3 ODIs; Somerset), born in Cape Town, South Africa

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1154 – Anastasius IV, Pope (1153-54), dies
1890 – Billy Midwinter, English-Australian cricket all-rounder (8 Tests Australia, 4 England), dies of insanity at 39
1894 – Robert Louis Stevenson, Scottish novelist (Treasure Island), dies at 45
1937 – Prosper Poullet, Belgian mayor, dies
1992 – Harry Ellerbe, actor (House of Usher, Magnetic Monster), dies at 91
1994 – Elizabeth Meyer, wife of Paul Michael Glaser, dies of AIDS at 47

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Help End Hunger in the United States

Hunger is a real problem in the United States—while there’s plenty of food to go around, there isn’t a great system in place for distributing the food efficiently. To help end hunger in the US, it’s a good idea to spread the message about how big the problem truly is. You can start raising money to donate to organizations, volunteering at local food banks, or writing to local lawmakers asking them to help with your mission of ending hunger.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Raising Awareness
Read about hunger in the US for up-to-date information. Go online to find information about hunger in the US—you can read articles providing statistics and peruse news stories covering the problem. Researching the topic beforehand will help you understand the problem, allowing you to come up with helpful solutions.[1]
Memorizing specific facts and statistics will help you be more persuasive and knowledgeable when discussing the topic with others.
Spread the word to friends and family to encourage them to help. Start up a discussion with your family and friends about the information you’ve learned through researching hunger in the US. Encourage them to talk to others about the hunger crisis and help them find ways to start volunteering their time or resources.[2]
You can also share what you’ve learned with coworkers or school acquaintances.
Use social media to help you spread the word, or focus on talking one-on-one with people to have a thorough conversation about it.
Use social media to inform others about the problem of hunger. This is a great way to reach a lot of people all at once. You can post scholarly or news articles about hunger in the US on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn, encouraging people to read them.[3]
You could also post links to interviews about the issue, or just post a couple of facts about the issue of hunger to get people thinking about it.
Encourage friends and other connections on social media to choose a way to help reduce hunger, such as hosting a food drive or donating to a food organization.
Organize a bake sale or run to raise awareness. By doing one of these events, not only will you be able to spread information to others, but you’ll also raise money in the process. Design a run to promote hunger awareness and encourage people to sign up. You can also set up a bake sale, yard sale, or other creative event to raise money for an organization that supports the hungry.[4]
Create a lemonade stand to raise money, or plan a local car wash.
Make signs to advertise your fundraising event and hang them up around town.
Start a letter campaign to encourage others to write to local lawmakers. By having lots of people write letters to lawmakers about the issue of hunger in the US, lawmakers will see how many people want change. To start your letter campaign, you can look up websites to help you with the process, such as https://help.actionnetwork.org/hc/en-us/articles/203112829-Creating-letter-campaigns.[5]
Brainstorm with others about topics to bring up in your letters, such as asking policymakers to increase funding for nutrition services.
Host a movie screening showing a movie about hunger in the US. Movies such as “A Place at the Table” highlight the issue of hunger in the country, making them a great tool for teaching others about the problem. Plan a movie screening at a place such as your local library, community center, or even your own home to get people together to learn about hunger.[6]
Go online to find other movies or documentaries discussing hunger in the US.
Ask your local community center or other spots suitable for movie screenings if they would help you with the screening.
Hang flyers around town telling when and where the movie screening will take place.
You can even create a Facebook event for the screening and invite your friends to it while encouraging them to invite people they know as well.[Edit]Supporting Programs and Organizations
Donate excess food in your home to an organization. If you have extra canned goods that aren’t being used or bought too much food the last time you went to the store, consider donating the leftovers. Do some research online to find an organization that’s right for your extra food.[7]
Use coupons when you go grocery shopping to purchase extra food specifically to donate.
Packaged food can almost always be donated, and there are many food pantries or organizations (such as Ample Harvest) that will take fresh food.
Contact your local food bank to learn about volunteer opportunities. Your local food bank or food pantry is always looking for people to help out, whether by organizing food, raising funds, or spreading awareness. Visit your local food bank in person, call their number, or visit their website to find out how you can get involved.[8]
They’ll be able to tell you valuable information, such as which foods are best to donate as well as other places that need help collecting food.
You can also check with your church or local non-profits to see if there are any events or opportunities to help raise money for food, start a food drive, or help end hunger in another way.
Host a healthy food drive in your area. Collect food from others that you can then donate to places such as a food pantry. Try to collect healthy foods instead of just junk food to provide a truly nutritious meal for someone.[9]
Ask for foods such as peanut butter, canned tuna, canned fruit, whole wheat pasta, or low-sodium canned beans.
Choose a place to have your food drive and put up flyers to advertise it.
Post on social media to encourage others to donate to the food drive.
Set up an online food drive to easily collect food. If you aren’t able to host a real food drive, you can start one online through You Give Goods. Click on “Start an Event” on the main page to set up your event, and make sure you pick a charity to donate the food to. People will be able to purchase food online through the site, and the food will go directly to the charity.[10]
You’ll be able to select a goal of how many food items you’d like to have donated, as well as how long you’d like the food drive to go on.
Check out the online food drive website at https://yougivegoods.com/.
Help grow food locally. Not only is growing food locally a great way to know where the food is coming from, but it’s also sure to be fresh, which is something that malnourished or hungry people truly need. Start getting involved in community gardening projects, or start your own mini garden and donate some of the food to people in need.[11]
Read your local paper, ask around, or look online to see if there are any community gardens in your area.
Volunteer throughout the year, not just during winter holidays. A lot of people choose Thanksgiving or Christmas to volunteer at food pantries, homeless shelters, or church organizations. Try to volunteer year-round to help make a difference no matter the holiday.[12][Edit]Choosing Organizations to Support
Contribute to Feeding America to provide meals to the hungry. Feeding America has over 200 food banks around the country, making them super accessible and influential in helping end hunger in the US. You can donate on their website, either donating a flat amount or by choosing to give money each month.[13]
They help distribute food through food pantries, soup kitchens, and after-school programs.
Click on the red “Donate” button at the top of the page when you visit http://www.feedingamerica.org/.
Each dollar you give to Feeding America provides 10 meals.
Donate to Meals on Wheels to promote the delivery of food. Meals on Wheels is an organization that delivers food to people who can’t make or buy their own food. There are Meals on Wheels organizations in every single state, so you can either donate online at their website, or you can contact your local Meals on Wheels site to see how else you can get involved.[14]
To donate to Meals on Wheels, click on the green “Donate” button at https://www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org/.
You can also sign up to volunteer with Meals on Wheels at https://www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org/americaletsdolunch#.
Visit Feed the Children’s website to make a difference in children’s lives. When you donate to Feed the Children, each dollar you give multiplies by 7, giving children nourishing food and important supplies. You can go on their website and click on the pink donate button to donate easily.[15]
Feed the Children also lets you sponsor a child, if desired.
Take action at http://www.feedthechildren.org/.
Support No Kid Hungry in their goal to reduce children’s hunger. No Kid Hungry works to do things like give kids meals over the summer when they don’t have access to school food, teach families about nutritious foods, and work with policymakers to change the food system.[16]
You can donate one time or monthly on their website at https://www.nokidhungry.org/.
Help UNICEF save children from experiencing hunger. UNICEF is a large organization that encourages people’s involvement to help end malnutrition, whether through advocating, fundraising, or donating. To donate, you can visit their website at https://www.unicefusa.org/.
Scroll over “Our Mission” and then click on “Nutrition” to learn more about their efforts to help end hunger.[Edit]References↑ https://www.worldhunger.org/learn-about-hunger/

↑ https://secure.feedingamerica.org/site/SPageServer?pagename=Pass_the_Plate

↑ https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/60-things-you-can-do-fight-hunger-america-slideshow

↑ https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/60-things-you-can-do-fight-hunger-america-slideshow

↑ http://www.wbur.org/cognoscenti/2014/09/17/hunger-in-america-food-distribution-ashley-stanley

↑ https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/60-things-you-can-do-fight-hunger-america-slideshow

↑ https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/60-things-you-can-do-fight-hunger-america-slideshow

↑ http://www.pointsoflight.org/blog/volunteer-end-hunger-america

↑ http://createthegood.org/toolkit/organize-food-drive

↑ https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/60-things-you-can-do-fight-hunger-america-slideshow

↑ https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/60-things-you-can-do-fight-hunger-america-slideshow

↑ https://www.channel3000.com/madison-magazine/dining-and-drink/giving-back-river-food-pantry-needs-volunteers-year-round/656352652

↑ http://www.feedingamerica.org/

↑ https://www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org/

↑ http://www.feedthechildren.org/

↑ https://www.nokidhungry.org/

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