How to Grease and Flour a Pan

Many recipes for baked goods call for the pan to be greased and floured prior to adding the batter and baking. This is an important step in the baking process to ensure that the finished product doesn’t stick to the sides of the pan. By greasing and flouring the pan you’re creating 2 layers of non-stick protection. To do this, all you’ll need to do is choose your greasing agent, decide between flour or cocoa powder, and make sure to cover every crevice of your baking pan.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Greasing Your Pan
Choose between butter or shortening to grease your pan with. Butter and shortening are the 2 most common fats used to grease baking pans. Butter will impart a slight richness to the batter and will help the exterior bake to a golden brown. Shortening is flavorless and the batter is less likely to brown.[1]
Oil-based sprays and vegetable oil should not be used to grease the pan. Oil turns into a hard glaze when it is heated that can be tough to remove from the pan.
Scoop up shortening with a pastry brush for a flavorless option. Gently dip your brush or paper towel into your shortening and pick up a glob about the size of a dollar coin. If your shortening is too hard, let it sit out at room temperature until it softens up enough to be pliable.[2]Leave your shortening within reach in case you need more for another pan.
You can buy pastry brushes at most home goods stores.
Open up a stick of unsalted butter for a smoother and richer pan lining. Grab a new stick of unsalted butter from the package. Open up 1 side of the paper until about half of the butter stick is out. Leave the paper on the bottom half of the butter so you can hold it without getting your hands greasy.[3]
Rub butter or shortening over the bottom and sides of your pan. Spread a thin layer of your greasing agent onto the entire bottom of your pan. Make sure there are no holes in your layer. Go over every part of the pan at least once. Turn your pan on its side and apply your greasing agent to the sides of the pan as well.[4]
Spray a thin layer of cooking spray on your pan if you are not baking. For normal stovetop pans and dishes, oil and cooking sprays are fine to use. Hold the spray can at least away from your pan. Spray a thin layer of spray over the whole pan, making sure to coat the entire thing.[5]A recipe will not usually ask you to flour your pan for stovetop cooking.[Edit]Adding Flour and Batter
Set aside some flour that is already used in your recipe. Various flour types can be used to flour the pan, but the rule of thumb is to use the flour that the recipe called for. This way you won’t be altering the taste or composition of the batter.[6]
Choose cocoa powder instead of flour for chocolate baked goods. Flour is tasteless, but it can leave a white residue on baked goods, especially if they are chocolate ones. For chocolate cakes, muffins, or any baked good that has cocoa powder in it, set aside some cocoa powder in place of flour.[7]
Sprinkle flour or cocoa powder onto the pan. Add 1 or 2 tbsp. (15 to 30 ml) of flour or cocoa powder to the greased pan by pinching it in between your fingers and sprinkling it all over. Pick the pan up and tilt it about, allowing the flour to distribute and cover the entire interior of the pan. Invert the pan over the garbage or a sink and tap it gently with your hand to remove any excess flour.[8]The flour or cocoa powder will stick to the greasing agent that you’ve already put down.
Flour and cocoa powder both act as a second barrier between your baked good and the pan.
If your recipe calls for parchment paper in addition to greasing and flouring, put the parchment paper down on top of the grease and the flour or cocoa powder. It will act as another barrier between your baked good and the pan.
Pour your batter into the pan. Hold your bowl of batter directly over the pan. Gently pour it in, using a spoon if you need to scrape the bowl. The flour and grease will provide a non-stick layer so that your baked good does not stick to your pan. Bake your batter according to the recipe.[9]Greasing and flouring your pan works better than using a non-stick oil spray.[Edit]Tips
Some recipes will just ask you to flour the pan, but they still want you to grease it first.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Prepare a Cake Pan
Pick the Right Gluten Free Flour Substitute for Your Conventional Recipe
[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/the-science-behind-greasing-and-flouring-cake-pans-before-baking-221900

↑ https://www.bhg.com/recipes/desserts/cakes/how-to-keep-cake-from-sticking-to-the-pan/

↑ https://spoonuniversity.com/lifestyle/grease-a-baking-pan-without-non-stick-spray

↑ https://www.bhg.com/recipes/desserts/cakes/how-to-keep-cake-from-sticking-to-the-pan/

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/the-best-way-to-use-cooking-spray-without-making-a-mess-tips-from-the-kitchn-203877

↑ https://www.bhg.com/recipes/desserts/cakes/how-to-keep-cake-from-sticking-to-the-pan/

↑ https://www.bhg.com/recipes/desserts/cakes/how-to-keep-cake-from-sticking-to-the-pan/

↑ https://www.allrecipes.com/video/142/how-to-prep-cake-pans/

↑ http://cooklikeyourgrandmother.com/how-to-flour-pan/

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Today in History for 4th December 2019

Historical Events

1674 – Father Marquette builds first dwelling in what is now Chicago
1933 – Jack Kirkland’s play “Tobacco Road” premieres in NYC, became the longest-running play of its time
1944 – Germans destroy Rhine dikes, Betuwe flooded
1961 – Smallest NY Knick, 49th St Madison Square Garden crowd-1,300 (snowstorm)
1971 – The UN Security Council calls an emergency session to consider the deteriorating situation between India and Pakistan
1989 – NBC’s premiere of “Howard Beach: Making A Case for Murder”, based on December 1986 murders of black youths by white youths in New York City

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1791 – Johann Gottlob Topfer, German composer, born in Niederroßla (d. 1870)
1866 – Wassily Kandinsky, Russian-French abstract painter (Dreamy Inspiration), born in Moscow (d. 1944)
1868 – Richard Nicolaas Roland Holst, Dutch artist and painter, born in Amsterdam, Netherlands (d. 1938)
1935 – Robert Vesco, American financier and fugitive, born in Detroit, Michigan (d. 2007)
1941 – Humberto Solás, Cuban film director and writer (Lucia), born in Havana, Cuba (d. 2008)
1950 – Jan Rietman, Dutch radio and TV host, born in Doetinchem, Netherlands

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Famous Deaths

765 – Jafar al-Sadiq, Muslim scholar and scientist, dies at 63
1334 – Pope John XXII (1316-1334) (b. 1249)
1893 – John Tyndall, Irish physicist who demonstrated why the sky is blue and proved that the Earth’s atmosphere has a greenhouse effect, dies at 73
1935 – Johan Halvorsen, composer, dies at 71
1983 – Estelle Omens, actress (Effect of Gamma Rays), dies at 55
2017 – Shashi Kapoor [Balbir Raj Kapoor], prominent Indian Bollywood actor (Deewar, The Deceivers, Shalimar, Heat and Dust), dies from a chest infection at 79

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How to Hang Christmas Lights Inside Windows

Putting up Christmas lights inside your home is a great way to get into the holiday spirit! Plus, they will make the interior of your home feel cozy and cheerful. Whether you want to avoid the difficulties of trying to put up lights in the cold, or just hope to make your house look festive inside and out, hanging Christmas lights in your windows is a simple way to decorate for the best season of the year!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Finding the Correct Lights
Measure the edges of the windows where you want to hang the lights. That way, you’ll know how many strands of what size you need to fully outline all your windows. Use a measuring tape to get exact measurements, as you don’t want to be a few inches or centimeters short of making your window look perfect.[1]
Make sure there’s a power outlet nearby to plug the lights into if you don’t plan on using battery-operated lights.
Choose mini-lights or C6 lights to better outline your windows. There are other types of Christmas light bulbs available to use as well, if you’d prefer to lend your windows a slightly different aesthetic. For example, LEDs have a more bluish tint. There are also wide-angle LEDs, transparent, ceramic, globe, net lights, and RGB LEDs.[2]
Not only are mini-lights cheap, but the light they give off is more ethereal and delicate since they’re smaller.
C6 lights are the smallest version of the traditional strawberry-shaped Christmas bulb, so they look classic without being overwhelming.
Pick battery operated LEDs for a cleaner look. Sometimes, seeing an extension cord attached to the lights can ruin the look of a wonderful display. Furthermore, because battery-operated lights don’t use electricity, they give off less heat and are less likely to pose a fire hazard.[3]
Match your wires to the woodwork of your window. If you have white woodwork, a string of Christmas lights with green wire will stand out and be less subtle than a string with white wire. Dark woodwork requires darker wire.[4]
If the wires match the woodwork, the lights themselves will be more emphasized.
The shorter the distance between each lightbulb, the denser the lights will be and the more focus will be taken away from the wires.
Test that your lights and cords are working. You don’t want to get them all set up, only to plug them in and discover a section of the lights are dark. All you have to do is plug the lights into an outlet and make sure each bulb is glowing.
If one of the bulbs is broken or dim, see if you can purchase a replacement bulb rather than an entirely different strand of lights.
Frayed or otherwise damaged cords are a safety hazard and should not be used at all.[5][Edit]Putting Up the Lights
Purchase plastic stick-on clips/hooks for the inside of the window frame. The clips will be easy to remove at the end of the holiday season and won’t damage your windows or leave behind sticky residue. These can be found at most hardware stores.[6]
Each window usually requires 6-8 clips.[7]
Place the plastic clips on the inside of the window frame. To do this, remove the backing from one side of the adhesive strip and press that side firmly on the window frame. Wait 30 seconds, then remove the paper from the second side of the adhesive and press the flat end of the plastic clip against the second side.
You only need to place the clips on the top and sides of the window frame.
The clips should be about apart and spaced out regularly.[8]
Let the clips set for at least an hour. If you hang anything on them prior to the time running out, the clips may come down. That might damage not just the window frame from the clips being removed incorrectly, but also the Christmas lights if they are dropped from a substantial height onto a hard surface.[9]
Slide the lights into the clips. Squeeze the wires of the string of Christmas lights into each clip. Then, work your way carefully around the window frame, squeezing more wires into place as you go.
Try to get the light bulbs to all face in the same direction.[10]
Add additional decorations to the window, if you’d like. For example, you can place some battery operated candles on the windowsill or some festive garlands. If the garlands come with their own lights, make sure you like how they look in conjunction with the ones around the window.[Edit]References↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMX2kKXX6sw&feature=youtu.be&t=28

↑ https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/outdoor-projects/how-to/g1684/how-to-hang-outdoor-christmas-lights/

↑ http://www.mfb.vic.gov.au/News/Fire-Chiefs-warn-about-dangers-of-Christmas-lights.html

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXJynshY-Nk&feature=youtu.be&t=75

↑ https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/guidance/product-safety/christmas-lights/

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXJynshY-Nk&feature=youtu.be&t=22

↑ https://christmastreesource.com/how-hang-lights-in-window/

↑ https://christmastreesource.com/how-hang-lights-in-window/

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXJynshY-Nk&feature=youtu.be&t=43

↑ https://christmastreesource.com/how-hang-lights-in-window/

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