How to Become a Lobbyist

While every state has its own specific definition of the term, a lobbyist is usually defined as someone who attempts to influence government decisions on behalf of a person or organization.[1] If you’re a persuasive person with a passion for making a difference, a lobbying career might be right for you! While there are no specific educational requirements to become a lobbyist, you can benefit from having a strong background in the law or political science. You’ll also need to register with your local government to work as a lobbyist. From there, you can start looking for lobbyist careers!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Getting the Right Training
Take courses in political science or related fields. You don’t have to have a degree in a specific field to become a lobbyist.[2] However, studying political science or other relevant subjects can give you the skills and knowledge you need to be successful. Specific lobbying jobs may also require you to have a minimum level of education (e.g., a bachelor’s degree).
For example, many lobbyists have degrees in political science, communications, economics, or law.
Build strong communication skills. Being able to communicate clearly and persuasively is key to being a successful lobbyist.[3] If you’re in school or college, sign up for courses in writing and public speaking to build up your written and verbal communication abilities.
Signing up for your school’s debate team or mock trial club can be a great way to hone your argumentative skills!
You can also take writing and speaking classes online through websites like Udemy, Coursera, and edX.
Pursue an advanced degree to get a competitive edge. You don’t need an advanced or specialized degree to be a lobbyist, but getting one of these degrees can make you look more impressive to employers. This is also a useful approach if you want to lobby in a particular area of interest.
For example, if you want to work as a health care lobbyist, you may find it helpful to pursue an advanced healthcare degree, such as DNP (Doctor of Nursing Practice).[4]
A law degree can also give you a competitive advantage in the lobbying field.[5]
Learn about basic legislative rules and procedures. Understanding how the legislative process works can help you become a much more effective lobbyist. Take time to research how the system works so that you have a strong understanding of how measures are introduced and how bills are passed.[6]
Robert’s Rules of Order is a very useful guide to the basic rules of legislative procedure.
Many state government websites offer specific information about local legislative process. Try doing an online search using terms such as “legislative process Illinois” or “how a bill becomes law Texas.”
Read up on current issues in your area of interest. If you’re interested in lobbying in a particular field, stay on top of current events and legislative issues in that field, especially in your local area. Staying informed on what the issues are—and where your local lawmakers stand—will help you figure out which legislators to target and how to build the most persuasive arguments.[7]
Take time getting to know your local politicians, their histories, and where they stand on the issues you’re interested in.
You may find it helpful to talk to other lobbyists in your area and get their perspective on how the system works.
Spend time in a government job to gain experience. A lot of people break into the lobbying field after working in a government office. Doing so can help you gain expertise in local policy making procedures and will also make you look more impressive to prospective employers or clients. You might try:[8]
Running for elected office in the legislative or executive branches of your local government. This will give you direct experience with the legislative process.
If you can’t run for office, getting a staff position with the legislature is another great way to get your foot in the door. For example, you might apply to be a legislative assistant for your local congressperson.[Edit]Registering as a Lobbyist
Look into your state’s lobbying registration laws. All states in the U.S. require lobbyists to register with the state before doing any lobbying activities.[9] Before you start working as a lobbyist, check with your Secretary of State’s office to find out what information you need to provide and whether you need to pay a registration fee.
You can find a list of registration requirements by state here: http://www.ncsl.org/research/ethics/50-state-chart-lobbyist-registration-requirements.aspx
You may need to supply information such as what kind of compensation you are receiving for your lobbying work, who your clients or employers are, and which subject(s) you’ll be lobbying about.
Take any required lobbying courses before registering. Some states require lobbyists to take training courses or seminars before doing any lobbying work. These courses typically focus on ethics training. Check with your Secretary of State’s office to find out if you need any special training before you begin work.
For example, lobbyists in California are required to take a Lobbyist Ethics Course and certify the completion of this course with the Secretary of State’s office by a specific deadline.[10]
Keep up with your lobbying reports. Most states require lobbyists to file regular disclosure reports about their activities. Inquire with your Secretary of State’s office about how often you need to file reports and what kind of information you have to provide. You can find a summary of activity report requirements for each state here: http://www.ncsl.org/research/ethics/50-state-chart-lobbyist-report-requirements.aspx.
These reports are available to the public and they usually contain information about how much money you or your client are spending on lobbying and which issues you are lobbying about.
Your employer or client may also need to file reports about your activities.[Edit]Finding Lobbyist Jobs
Familiarize yourself with the types of lobbying jobs. There are a variety of different ways to approach being a lobbyist. You can work as a contracted lobbyist for an organization such as a company or trade association, or you can work in-house as a full time government relations employee for a business. Local government administrations also hire lobbyists to communicate with the legislature on their behalf.[11]
For example, a drug company might hire a health care lobbyist full time in a government relations position.[12]
Check lobbyist-specific job boards. When you’re ready to look for lobbyist jobs, dedicated job boards or sites devoted to lobbying-related jobs are a good place to start. For example, you might look for jobs in your area on websites such as:
Lobbyingjobs.com, a website dedicated to posting lobbyist and government relations positions.
Workforgood.org, which posts jobs with nonprofits and mission-driven organizations, including advocacy/lobbying jobs.
The PAC.org job board, which lists job opportunities for public affairs professionals.
Look for lobbyist jobs on general job sites. In addition to using dedicated job boards, you can also find lobbyist jobs on general job sites such as Indeed and Monster.com. Use these sites to search for lobbyist jobs in your area.
In addition to “lobbyist,” use search terms such as “advocacy” and “government relations.”
Reach out to your professional network about job opportunities. Many lobbyists find jobs through networking and word of mouth. If you’ve had a chance to make some contacts in your community, let them know that you are in the market for a lobbying job. Someone may be able to put in a good word for you with a colleague who’s looking to hire![13]
Talking to other lobbyists can be a good way to find out about potential job openings.
Apply for jobs that align with your interests and experience. You’ll be most happy and successful as a lobbyist if you do work in an area that you’re passionate and knowledgeable about.[14] Look for positions that are a good fit for your strengths and interests, but that also align well with your personal moral and ethical standards.
For example, if you’re interested in health issues, a job with a public health organization might be a good fit for you. On the other hand, you might not be happy lobbying for a tobacco company that’s pushing for fewer restrictions on advertising.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Become a Leasing Consultant
Become a Public Adjuster[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.ncsl.org/research/ethics/50-state-chart-lobby-definitions.aspx

↑ https://onlinedegrees.bradley.edu/blog/how-do-you-become-a-health-care-lobbyist/

↑ https://career.virginia.edu/politics-policy-lobbying#Skills%20and%20Training

↑ https://onlinedegrees.bradley.edu/blog/how-do-you-become-a-health-care-lobbyist/

↑ https://capitolweekly.net/so-you-want-to-be-a-lobbyist/

↑ https://www.denverpost.com/2015/06/26/how-do-i-become-a-marijuana-lobbyist-tips-on-getting-involved/

↑ http://www.nea.org/home/43102.htm

↑ https://capitolweekly.net/so-you-want-to-be-a-lobbyist/

↑ http://www.ncsl.org/research/ethics/50-state-chart-lobbyist-registration-requirements.aspx

↑ https://www.sos.ca.gov/campaign-lobbying/cal-access-resources/ethics-training/

↑ https://capitolweekly.net/so-you-want-to-be-a-lobbyist/

↑ https://onlinedegrees.bradley.edu/blog/how-do-you-become-a-health-care-lobbyist/

↑ https://capitolweekly.net/so-you-want-to-be-a-lobbyist/

↑ https://capitolweekly.net/so-you-want-to-be-a-lobbyist/

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Today in History for 5th December 2019

Historical Events

1590 – Niccolo Sfondrati chosen as Pope Gregory XIV
1892 – Sir John Thompson becomes the fourth Prime Minister of Canada.
1948 – NY Giant Charley Conerly sets NFL record of 36 pass completions
1964 – Captain Roger Donlon is awarded the first Medal of Honor of the Vietnam War for successfully repelling a large Viet Cong attack
1974 – 1st Wash Cap penalty shot, Tom Williams unsuccessful vs Buff Sabres
1988 – Boris Becker beats defending champion Ivan Lendl 5–7, 7–6, 3–6, 6–2, 7–6 in a classic final to win his first of 3 ATP Masters Grand Prix tennis titles at Madison Square Garden, NYC

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Famous Birthdays

1901 – Walt [Walter Elias] Disney, American animator, (Mickey Mouse), producer and co-founder of Walt Disney Co., born in Chicago, Illinois (d. 1966)
1905 – Gus Mancuso, American baseball player (St. Louis Cardinals), born in Galveston, Texas (d. 1984)
1938 – J. J. Cale, American rock guitarist (After Midnight), born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (d. 2013)
1949 – Lanny Wadkins, American golfer (PGA C’ship 1977), born in Richmond, Virginia
1962 – José Cura, Argentine tenor, born in Rosario, Argentina
1963 – Carrie Hamilton, American actress (Fame), born in NYC, New York (d. 2002)

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Famous Deaths

1886 – Peter Hofstede de Groot, Dutch reformed theologist, dies at 84
1941 – Amrita Sher-Gil, Hungarian-Indian painter described as the “Indian Frida Kahlo” and “one of the greatest avant-garde women artists of the early 20th century,” dies of complications from a failed abortion at 28
1989 – John M Pritchard, British conductor, dies at 68
1995 – Robert Charles Evans, mountaineer/doctor, dies at 77
2002 – Ne Win, Burmese leader (b. 1911)
2010 – Don Meredith, American football player and broadcaster (b. 1938)

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How to Relieve Stress As a Type A Personality

People with a Type A personality are thought of as competitive and urgent, and as people who tend to crave perfection. Some psychologists consider the Type A/Type B dichotomy to be less of a personality trait and more of a way to describe strategies for handling stress. If you are someone who knows you tend toward Type A stress management, it can be difficult to find a way out of negative patterns. By taking a hint from some Type B strategies and finding ways to calm yourself down under pressure and in your daily life, you can relieve some of the stress that weighs you down.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Changing Your Perspective
Put failures and anxieties into context. As a Type A personality, it can be easy to get stuck on momentary feelings of failure, regret, and worry about the future. When these feelings start to overcome you, try to think of them on a bigger scale by thinking about how there are always factors that are outside of your control.[1]
One of the defining features of a Type A personality is a focus on details at the expense of the bigger picture, which can put a lot of stress on you.
For stressors that seem all-consuming, like being stuck in traffic on the way to a meeting or losing a big project at work, try putting them on a scale of time, asking yourself if the issue will seem so important in a week, in a year, or even in a decade or two.
Redefine what success looks like in terms of your tasks and goals. Many Type A personalities have a sense of perfectionism that tries to quarantine their work into two boxes of strictly “Success” and “Failure.” Instead of getting stuck on worrying about failure, focus on new ideas of what success can mean in your life and work, on both a small and large scale.[2]
Try to think of situations in the context of your life right now. Ask yourself if something is the best you could do here and now, in the situation that you are in, rather than imagining a perfect world.
For example, if you feel like you can’t finish a task as well as you want to, ask yourself if the work you’ve done is acceptable for the resources and time you have available.
Think positive thoughts about yourself. In order to avoid spiraling into negative thought patterns, you’ll need to rephrase your internal monologue when you get down on yourself. For Type A personalities, drowning out your inner critic can be a challenge, but try repeating affirmations about yourself that reinforce your self-worth.[3]
Some ways to try positive self-talk include focusing on your accomplishments, praising yourself for your strengths, and forgiving yourself for your mistakes.
Examples of things you can say to yourself include, “I am capable of doing this,” “My worth isn’t defined by my ability to do this,” and “I’m not a bad person for messing that up, I’ll try again and get better.”
Build a growth mindset by believing in your ability to improve. One way to move past stress is to change your perspective from the ground up. Try to build one that doesn’t get held back by labels or past mistakes, often called a “growth mindset.” Start to view yourself as someone capable of improving and growing, rather than “a failure” or “a success.”[4]
As you build up a growth mindset, you may find yourself feeling better about the challenges life throws at you.
You might try responding to your own black-and-white thinking with phrases like, “No, I’m not a failure, but I’m not a success either. I am me, and I can always get better.”[Edit]Calming Yourself Down
Focus on your breath. If you find yourself in a particularly stressful situation, one of the best ways to address it is to pay attention to your breathing and try to slow it down. One technique that is used by professionals like paramedics and firefighters is to breathe in for 4 seconds, hold your breath for 4 seconds, and then hold your exhale for 4 seconds.[5]
This breathing method will kickstart your body’s natural relaxation response.
Ground yourself in your body by tensing and relaxing muscle groups. Starting with your shoulders, feel any discomfort in your body and tense up your muscles, releasing them after about 5 seconds. As you move through your body, tensing and releasing muscles, you will be simultaneously releasing tension and helping ground your mind in your body.[6]
Walk around the office or the block. Going for a walk will relax you as it shifts your attention from a stressful situation. Walks also make good opportunities to focus on breathing and your body. If you are stressed by an interaction with someone, a walk allows you to take a break and come back feeling refreshed.[7]
A walk is also a great time to check in with yourself about your priorities and to identify what is causing you the most stress.
Repeat a calming word or phrase out loud or in your head. Quiet repetition is often soothing, and by repeating an uplifting or reassuring thought, you may start to feel more capable and strong. Find a word or phrase that is simple and clear, but still inspires you to feel confident, like “I can do this,” or “this feeling will pass.”[8][Edit]Slowing Down Your Day-to-Day Life
Practice a relaxing activity like yoga, tai chi, qigong, or meditation. Starting a regular practice that helps you center yourself and focus on calming racing thoughts can make it easier to cope with the stresses of perfectionism and deadlines. Try using meditation videos or apps to get the hang of quieting your mind, and consider attending classes on yoga, tai chi, or qigong.[9]
Grounding yourself in your body is a good way to help reduce the stress of getting caught up in your head.
Set aside time to do something you love without distraction. Spend 30 minutes or an hour each day reading, exercising, gardening, or anything else that brings you joy with anything that stresses you out turned off or put away. Taking time to enjoy an activity without anything getting in the way will help create quality time with yourself that will relieve stress and help keep it away..[10]
Some examples of things to put away are devices that can give you notifications, especially work gadgets and smartphones, and keeping things like school materials out of sight.
You might also start to grow more confident that you can take breaks without the world crashing down.
Keep a journal to feel more in control of your emotions. Filling a journal full of daily entries, drawings, and scribblings can give you an opportunity to feel more control over your emotions and your reactions to things in your daily life. Writing is a powerful way to change your perspective too, since you can catch yourself writing negative thoughts and try to reframe them.[11]
Trying to express your feelings in a creative way will also help you gain insight into the thoughts and feelings you have, which can make you more in touch throughout the day.[Edit]References↑ https://www.thecut.com/article/ways-to-manage-type-a-personality.html

↑ https://www.thecut.com/article/ways-to-manage-type-a-personality.html

↑ https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/positive-thinking/art-20043950

↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/click-here-happiness/201904/15-ways-build-growth-mindset

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/relaxation-techniques-breath-control-helps-quell-errant-stress-response

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/six-relaxation-techniques-to-reduce-stress

↑ https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/exercise-and-stress/art-20044469

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/six-relaxation-techniques-to-reduce-stress

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/six-relaxation-techniques-to-reduce-stress

↑ https://www.forbes.com/sites/travisbradberry/2014/02/06/how-successful-people-stay-calm/#6fa38ef22f79

↑ https://blogs.psychcentral.com/emotionally-sensitive/2012/04/self-soothing-calming-the-amgydala/

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