How to Get Rid of Mice

Finding a mouse in your home can be worrying since there may be more hiding nearby. Mice can get into your food and belongings and spread disease, so try to get them out of your home as soon as possible. Set traps or place bait to get rid of them fast, and then clean and seal any areas where mice may enter. Once you take preventative measures, you can say goodbye to mice for good!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Looking for Signs of Mice
Look for droppings. Check for mouse droppings near common problem areas, such as kitchen cabinets or in your pantry. Inspect the area for dark droppings that look like grains of rice and are about long. Droppings that are wet and black are fresh while older ones are dry and have a lighter gray color.[1]
The presence of droppings can also indicate that there’s a crack or hole in the room through which mice can enter.
Listen for scratching or squeaking near sunrise and sunset. Mice are the most active 30 minutes after sunset and 30 minutes before sunrise since they’re nocturnal. Listen for light scratching or scampering sounds near your walls or in areas where you suspect mice. If you hear multiple squeaks or noises, you may have more than 1 mouse in your home.[2]
Common areas where you may hear mice include basements, attics, and kitchens.
Look for dime-sized holes in your walls near the floor. If mice are living in your walls, they may have chewed through the drywall to get into your home. Inspect corners in your home or underneath cabinets to see if you there small holes with smooth edges. If you notice any holes, then mice can easily get in and out of your home.[3]
Don’t forget to inspect outside your home as well since mice may be coming in from the wild.
Watch along interior walls or ledges for mouse pathways. Mice usually follow the same pathways while they run through your home, so you may be able to see common problem areas. Usually, the runs are along interior walls or on ledges surrounding your home. Look for oily rub marks on the wall to see if mice have been in the area.[4]
You may also notice droppings or urine stains along the pathways as well.
Look for any small, sudden movements you notice in your home since they could be mice.
Look for signs of a nest in attics or basements. Mice will build nests when they breed so they have a comfortable space for their young. Check for round nests made of cardboard, fabric, and other scrap materials in your attic, basement, and underneath your cabinets. If you find a nest, contact a professional exterminator immediately so they can get rid of it properly.[5]
Mice chew through cardboard boxes and items of clothing to use as materials for their nests. Look for tiny holes in the pile of clothes you’ve left sitting in the back of your closet.
A musty smell might also indicate the presence of a mouse nest.[Edit]Catching Mice
Get live traps if you want to catch mice humanely. Put the traps along any mouse pathways you found in your home or near problem areas along the wall. Place a bit of peanut butter or cheese inside the trap so mice are drawn to the scent. Each live trap is different, but you’ll be able to visually see if the trap is set or if it’s empty just by looking at it. Once a mouse has been caught, take the trap to a field about away so it doesn’t return to your home.[6]
Wear gloves when baiting or handling traps so the mice can’t detect your scent.
Some live traps only catch 1 mouse while others can catch multiple. Choose the type of trap that works best for you.
Experiment with different types of bait, like marshmallows and jelly, to see if the mice like a different flavor.
Use snap traps to kill the mice immediately. Set the snap trap in an area along the wall or on a pathway you’ve found earlier. Place a bit of bait, such as peanut butter or jam, on the bait pad. Pull the U-shaped wire piece back and hold it down with one hand. Use your other hand to set the metal bar onto the latch with the bait. When the mouse steps on the trap to eat the bait, the wire will snap down on the mouse and kill it.[7]
Make sure to throw out snap traps as soon as mice are caught, and sanitize the area afterward.
Be careful while setting the trap since the U-shaped piece is spring-loaded and will close quickly.
Don’t keep snap traps in areas where pets or small children could reach them since they could get hurt.
Move your traps every 2-3 days. Check your traps twice a day to see if you’ve captured any mice. If you haven’t caught any mice in the traps within a few days, move them to a different area of your home where you suspect mice have been. Since mice often use the same paths, they’re more likely to return to the area.[8]
Mice travel from their nest every night. If you’ve found a nest in your home, keep the traps close by.
Use a baited poison as a last resort. Look for poisonous bait traps in the pest control section of your local store. Place the traps in areas where you notice activity, such as behind a cabinet or in your basement. When a mouse eats the bait, they will slowly die as the poison digests.[9]
Some poison bait traps also capture the mice so they can’t run away after they eat it.
Keep poison traps away from pets or small children since they could get extremely sick if they eat it.
Don’t keep the poison near any food items since they could cross-contaminate one another.[Edit]Keeping Mice out of Your Home
Clean your house frequently. After you eat or prepare a meal, be sure to do your dishes immediately and clean up after yourself. Don’t leave any food scraps out overnight since mice may try to find food on your countertops. Go through your house daily to sweep or vacuum any dirty areas to help deter mice from coming in.[10]
Cleaning your house won’t stop mice entirely, but it eliminates any food sources they may have had.
Declutter your home since mice are usually attracted to dark, unused spaces.
Keep any loose food in airtight containers. Make sure all grains, nuts, and other dry goods are stored in tightly sealed containers. If the container isn’t sealable, use plastic wrap to cover it instead. This will help block the scent so mice can’t smell it as well and protects your food.[11]
Transfer open food from boxes or bags into a different container so mice can’t smell them.
Don’t leave bread or fruit sitting out on the counter for more than a day or two. Either put them in a container or in your refrigerator.
Clean your pantry and cabinets often. Make sure crumbs, dried juice, and other stray bits of food don’t sit on your kitchen floor. Remain vigilant and observe any signs of pantry raiding by the pesky critter, then provision to eliminate the opportunity for the mouse family to dine.
Seal any entryways into your home so mice can’t get in. Look for holes inside and outside your home where mice may enter from. Cover any cracks or holes you find in your walls with mesh so mice can’t get through it. Make sure entrances from your chimney or pipes leading outside are also covered with the mesh. You can also stuff any holes you find with steel wool since mice can’t chew through it.[12]
Make sure the gap under your door isn’t providing a convenient entrance for mice.
Spray entrances and problem areas with peppermint oil to deter the mice. Mix of peppermint oil and of water in a spray bottle. Spray along the pathways and areas where you’ve noticed mice actively going. The strong scent of the peppermint will deter the mice away from the area. Reapply the spray every few days so it stays fresh.[13]
You can also leave cotton balls soaked with peppermint oil along common mouse pathways for 1 week at a time.
Bring a cat in your home to scare the mice away. Cats are natural predators of mice, and just having one in your home can scare mice away. Let your house cat spend time in the room where mice are present so it can spread its scent. Mice will be able to sense a predator and avoid the area from now on.[14]
You can borrow a friend’s cat for a few days to help scare the mice away.
Mice may still hide in areas where the cat can’t reach, such as an attic.[Edit]Warnings
Don’t place mousetraps or poison anywhere where children or pets could easily access it.
Always wear gloves while handling a trap to prevent the spread of bacteria.
If you’ve tried preventative measures and you still have mice in your home, contact an exterminator to get them professionally removed.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Catching Mice
Live traps
Snap traps
Mouse bait[Edit]Keeping Mice out of Your Home
Cleaning supplies
Sealable plastic containers
Wire mesh
Peppermint oil
Spray bottle[Edit]Related wikiHows
Get a Mouse Out of the House
Get Rats and Mice out of Compost
Get Rid of House and Garden Pests[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.pests.org/mice-droppings-identification-risks-dangers/

↑ https://www.crittercontrol.com/services/mice/mouse-noises

↑ https://youtu.be/2iVl-XhgVU8?t=104

↑ https://youtu.be/2iVl-XhgVU8?t=126

↑ https://www.pantherpestcontrol.co.uk/mice-control/what-house-mouse-nest-look-like/

↑ https://youtu.be/SKYLmsldzmg?t=33

↑ https://youtu.be/ojLVIRdahtQ?t=7

↑ https://youtu.be/SKYLmsldzmg?t=1m32s

↑ https://www.epa.gov/rodenticides/safely-use-rodent-bait-products

↑ https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/3206/

↑ https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/3206/

↑ https://www.health.ny.gov/publications/3206/

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/does-peppermint-oil-really-get-rid-of-mice-212162

↑ https://www.seniorcatwellness.com/do-cats-deter-mice/

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Today in History for 7th December 2019

Historical Events

1911 – Leslie J Stuart’s musical “Betsy” premieres in NYC
1940 – North Africa: British counter offensive under general O’Connor
1956 – American diver Pat McCormick wraps up the women’s double when she wins the 10m platform gold medal at the Melbourne Olympics with 84.85 points; also won the 3m springboard gold
1956 – Helen O’Connell joins Today Show panel
1988 – Mikhail Gorbachev cheered by Wall St crowds upon arrival in NYC
1988 – NY Islanders fire Simpson, Arbour new coach

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

967 – Abū-Sa’īd Abul-Khayr, Persian mystic and poet, born in Mihne, Greater Khorasan (d. 1049)
1598 – Gian Lorenzo [Giovanni] Bernini, Italian baroque sculptor (St Teresa in Ecstasy), painter and architect, born in Naples, Italy (d. 1680)
1958 – “Ravishing” Rick Rude, American professional wrestler, born in St. Peter, Minnesota (d. 1999)
1976 – Alan Faneca, American football player (Pittsburgh Steelers), born in New Orleans, Louisiana
1976 – Georges Laraque, Canadian ice hockey player (Edmonton Oilers), born in Montreal, Quebec
1979 – Derek Ramsay, British-Filipino actor and model, born in Enfield, England

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1723 – Jan Santini Aichel, Bohemian architect (b. 1677)
1860 – Konstantin Sergeyevich Aksakov, Russian historian and poet, dies at 43
1941 – Mervyn S. Bennion, United States Navy Captain, Medal of Honor recipient, killed in Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (b. 1887)
1985 – Potter Stewart, 94th Supreme Court Justice (1958-81), dies in NH at 70
1990 – Peter Mieg, Swiss composer, dies at 84
2008 – Dennis Yost, American vocalist, dies at 65

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Make Dried Orange Slices

Dried orange slices make a classic decoration for trees and wreaths during the holiday season. They’re also a tasty treat! After cutting an orange into slices, dry them using an oven, a microwave, a food dehydrator, or even natural sunlight. When the slices look and feel dry, they’re ready!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Cutting and Prepping Fresh Orange Slices
Cut the orange widthwise into slices. Consider the stem side the “North Pole” of the orange and orient it so it’s on its side. Carefully use a sharp kitchen knife to create even slices. Discard the first and last slices (the “North” and “South Poles”).[1]For the best results, use ripe (but not over-ripe) oranges without bruises or blemishes.
Blot away any surface moisture with paper towels. Lay all the cut slices on a plate or tray, then dab them with a paper towel to soak up any surface moisture. Turn the slices over and repeat the process with another clean paper towel.[2]This step isn’t absolutely necessary, but it will help the slices to dry out faster.
Use plain white paper towels. Decorated paper towels can sometimes transfer colored spots onto the slices.
Spike the cut slices with cloves to make decorations. Use a knife tip to cut a small hole through each fresh orange slice, just inside the rings of pith and skin, so you can loop a string through each opening after the slices are dried. Press a clove, star side up, into the center of each orange slice. Then, if desired, create a ring of cloves around the inside perimeter of the slice.[3]After the slices are dried, simply tie a colorful yarn or string through the hole in each slice so you can hang them.
Dried orange slices decorated with cloves are a traditional Christmas tree and wreath ornament in the UK. You can skip the cloves if desired.
Sprinkle on seasonings to make a sweet treat out of the slices. Lay the fresh slices on a plate or tray, then sprinkle them with white sugar, brown sugar, or coconut sugar. Follow up with a dusting of cinnamon, ginger, or both. Or, try other spice combinations until you find your favorite![4]Once dried, the seasoned slices make a great snack or dessert garnish.
If you want to use a slice as a drink garnish, cut a line in a fresh slice from the center through the skin on its perimeter. This will become a small wedge-shaped cutout once the slice is dried.
Use seedless oranges for snacking, or pick the seeds out of the slices before drying them.[Edit]Drying in the Oven
Set your oven at , or as low as possible. If your oven does not permit a setting this low, put it as low as it will go. At , it will usually take about 3.5-4.5 hours to dry the orange slices.[5]
At , it will typically take 2.5-3.5 hours.[6]
At , expect it to take 2-3 hours.[7]
Even though it takes longer, aim for the lowest temperature you can. This greatly reduces the chances of burning the slices instead of drying them.
Space out the slices on an oven rack or another wire rack. Remove the oven rack from the preheating oven, or use an oven-safe wire rack. Lay out the slices on the rack so that they have at least of space on all sides.[8]Spacing the slices out on a wire rack improves the air flow and decreases the drying time. Using a baking sheet may increase the drying time by up to double.
If you do choose to use a baking sheet, line it with parchment paper so the slices don’t stick.
Put the rack in the oven and turn the slices every 30-45 minutes. Frequent turning helps keep the slices from sticking. It also reduces the chances of burning, especially if the oven is at a slightly higher temperature. Simply pull the tray from the oven and use tongs to flip the slices when it’s time to turn them.[9]
Let the slices cool on the rack when they look and feel dry. Pull the slices from the oven as soon as they look fully dried and feel dried out when you touch them with the tongs. Let them cool to the touch on the rack, then confirm with your fingers that they feel completely dried.[10]
It may take up to 30 minutes for the slices to cool to room temperature.[Edit]Utilizing Your Microwave
Sandwich your cut slices between 2 thick layers of paper towels. Place 5-6 white paper towels on the microwave tray or a microwave-safe plate. Lay 4-5 orange slices on top of the paper towels, making sure they each have of space all around. Cover the slices with 5-6 more sheets of white paper towels.[11]Don’t use decorated paper towels, because they may transfer dyes to the orange slices.
Dry the slices in batches if you have more than 4-5 to dry.
Microwave the covered slices at 50% power for 8 minutes. Don’t heat the slices at full power, or you’ll end up with burnt discs instead of dried rounds! Consult your microwave’s instruction manual if necessary.[12]Use 50% power if your microwave is rated at 1000 watts or less. If it’s rated at greater than 1000 watts, set it at 40% or even 30% power.
Every microwave is different, so plan on some trial-and-error in finding the ideal power level and heating time for your orange slices.
Replace the paper towels and repeat the drying process. After 8 minutes, remove the orange slices, flip them over, and sandwich them between layers of 5-6 fresh paper towels. Put them back in the microwave for another 8 minutes at 50% power (or less, depending on your model).[13]
Stop microwaving the slices when they’re nearly fully dried. After 2, 3, or possibly even 4 rounds of microwaving, the orange slices should be almost completely dried out. They’ll never fully dry in the microwave without burning, so pull them at this point. Place them on a wire rack and give them 30-60 minutes to finish drying out.[14]If it’s a humid day, you may want to finish drying the slices in the oven. Set it as low as possible—ideally, —and heat the slices for about 30 minutes on a wire rack.[15][Edit]Using a Dehydrator or Natural Sunlight
Follow your dehydrator’s instructions for the easiest drying method. Lay the orange slices on the rack of the dehydrator, following the fruit spacing guidance for your model. Set the drying time based on your unit’s instructions—it typically takes around 6 hours to dry orange slices.[16]A food dehydrator takes longer than most drying methods, but it’s also the only “set it and forget it” option.
Lay the slices on a clean window screen for outdoor drying. If you want to dry your orange slices using only sunlight, lay them out on a framed mesh window screen. (Clean the screen thoroughly with soap and water, then let it dry fully, before using it!). Provide about of space between slices.[17]
If you plan to dry fruit regularly this way, buy a window screen solely for this purpose.
Outdoor drying works best if you live in a warm, sunny, dry climate. Don’t expect it to work on a cloudy, humid day!
Prop up the window screen in a spot that gets full sunshine. Set the corners of the window screen on concrete blocks, for instance, or use something else that raises the screen at least off the ground. Choose a spot that gets full sunlight for at least 6 hours, and ideally 8 or more.
The higher you prop up the screen, the more air flow the underside of the slices will get. This speeds up the drying process significantly.
Propping the screen up also helps protect the orange slices from hungry animals!
Flip the slices every 30-45 minutes until they’re dry. Frequent turning is the key to even drying in the sunlight. Use tongs or your fingers to flip over every slice. When they feel completely dry, they’re done![18]
The drying time will vary widely based on your environmental conditions. The slices may dry in as few as 2 hours, or as many as 8-10 hours.[Edit]Tips
Especially if you’re using the dried slices as a snack or garnish, store any you’re not using right away in an airtight container zip-close bag. They’ll typically last for 2-7 days this way, depending on their moisture level and the humidity. Look for any mold spots before eating them.[19][Edit]Warnings
Use a sharp knife and work safely when slicing oranges. Children should be supervised closely if they’re helping out.[Edit]References↑ https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/features/how-to-make-scented-orange-slice-tree-decorations

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/features/how-to-make-scented-orange-slice-tree-decorations

↑ https://www.cottercrunch.com/oven-dried-orange-slices-recipe-lightly-sweetened/

↑ https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/features/how-to-make-scented-orange-slice-tree-decorations

↑ https://www.cottercrunch.com/oven-dried-orange-slices-recipe-lightly-sweetened/

↑ https://www.redtedart.com/how-to-dry-orange-slice-orangenscheiben-trocknen/

↑ https://www.redtedart.com/how-to-dry-orange-slice-orangenscheiben-trocknen/

↑ https://www.redtedart.com/how-to-dry-orange-slice-orangenscheiben-trocknen/

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/features/how-to-make-scented-orange-slice-tree-decorations

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

↑ http://www.infobarrel.com/Drying_Orange_Slices_For_Crafts

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