How to Choose a Good Skateboard

Choosing a good skateboard can be tricky, especially if you are just beginning to get into the world of skateboarding. There is much more to take into account than just the cost, including deck type and size, truck height, and wheel size and hardness. This choice can be made easier if you understand how the different parts change the way the skateboard rides and what that means for how you want to use it. Once you understand what makes a good skateboard for you, you will be hitting up the skate parks in no time.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Selecting a Style
Choose a shortboard if you plan on doing park skating or learning tricks. Shortboards are what most people imagine when they think of a skateboard. The size of a shortboard makes it perfect for getting air and doing tricks. If this is what you envision yourself doing, a shortboard will work.[1]
Shortboards also work for casual riding, though they are not as versatile as longboards or penny boards for different types of terrain or longer distances.[2]
Get a longboard if you want to use your skateboard mainly for cruising. Longboards are heavier and bulkier than shortboards, meaning they will not be as good for performing tricks. What they are good for is taking long rides, making them a good choice if you want to use your skateboard as a means for transportation.
Because they are longer than regular skateboards, typically or more, this type of board also is easier to balance on, which may be beneficial if you are just beginning to learn to ride.[3]
Pick a lightweight penny board for easy transportation. Penny boards are similar to longboards in their purpose, but they are much lighter and much more portable. Penny boards are small, typically between and , and made of lightweight plastic, making them easy to pick up and carry around during the day.[4]
Penny boards are not as good for doing tricks because of their small size. If you think you might want to learn how to do some tricks on your board, this wouldn’t be the type to invest in.[Edit]Choosing the Size and Shape
Get a full-sized deck if you are taller than . Full-sized skateboards have a deck width of or larger, and are generally the best choice for most adults and some children.
Select a mid-sized deck if you are between . Mid-size decks have a width of . Decks this size are best for people who have a shoe size between US 7 and US 8, as well as children typically between the ages of 9 and 12.
Opt for a mini or micro skateboard for children. A mini skateboard is perfect for kids between and tall. Mini skateboards have a deck width of . If you’re under tall, go with a micro skateboard. This is the smallest size deck, and its deck is between {convert|6.5|in|cm}} and wide.
Pick a radial-, tub-, or progressive-shaped deck if you want a classic look and secure footing. Decks in these styles have a slight dip in the middle and raised edges. The indention in the middle allows you to plant your feet more firmly, letting you balance a little more easily than a flatter or differently-shaped model.[5]
If you are new to skateboarding, this style is probably best for you to begin learning on.
Go for a w-concave or asymmetric deck shape if you want a board for tricks. These styles allow for quick changes in direction, which makes doing tricks much easier. They are harder to balance on, so if you are new to skateboarding these shapes might not be for you.[6][Edit]Picking the Trucks and Wheels
Match the size of your trucks to the width of your skateboard. Every skateboard requires 2 trucks, which hold the wheels in place under the deck. Choose trucks that are the same size as, or at least very similar in size to, the skateboard’s width to provide maximum stability while riding.[7]
Choose low trucks for tricks and high ones for cruising. Truck heights are not standardized but are commonly divided into low, medium/mid-sized, and high trucks.[8]
Low trucks are designed for small wheels and are good for doing tricks.
Medium trucks are designed for general usage, either commuting or tricks.
High trucks are designed for large wheels and work best for cruising and casual riding.
Get smaller wheels if you are looking to use your skateboard for tricks. Smaller wheels, which are typically between 48 and 54 mm in diameter, provide more stability than larger wheels, meaning that they do well for skateboards that are used for doing tricks or riding in skate parks.[9] On the other hand, wheels of this size don’t allow for as much speed and make transportation difficult.
Opt for larger wheels if you want to use your skateboard for getting around. Larger wheels, usually 55+ mm in diameter, are not as stable, but they let you go faster and cruise for longer distances without having to put in much work. On the flip side, they aren’t as good for tricks or skating in parks.
Choose soft wheels for a smooth ride. Softer skateboard wheels are easier to ride on because they provide more grip, but soft wheels also wear down faster. Get softer wheels if you plan on using your skateboard for transportation; this will let you ride on pretty much any type of road or surface. Softer wheels don’t go as fast, but they provide smoother rides because they can grip the surface of the ground better.[10]
Opt for harder wheels if you want to go faster. Wheel sizes on skateboards vary a bit (but all are measured in millimeters) and are based on what the skateboard will be used for. In general, as wheels get larger, they allow for greater speeds.[11] Hard wheels let you ride faster and more easily do tricks, but they don’t have much grip and should only be used on smooth surfaces, like in a skate park.[12][Edit]Tips
Depending on your level of comfort with the task, you may or may not want to choose to build your own custom skateboard. Creating your own means that you can match your exact specifications and be in complete control over design choices.
If you don’t want to build your own skateboard, buying a pre-made one is the best way to go.[13] There are many ways to go about this process, but the best way to begin is to go to your local skate shop and look around. The people who work there can help you get exactly what you need and ensure quality and safety standards.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Skateboard
Assemble a Skateboard
Go to a Skatepark[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://youtu.be/H0-IeXhD1eU?t=7

↑ https://youtu.be/ea396EwL0cs?t=117s

↑ https://youtu.be/ea396EwL0cs?t=20s

↑ https://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/23/style/penny-skateboards-find-a-niche.html

↑ https://youtu.be/MnFu20s85PQ?t=9

↑ https://youtu.be/MnFu20s85PQ?t=9

↑ https://youtu.be/hCzQpS1CjoI?t=208s

↑ https://www.skatedeluxe.com/blog/en/wiki/skateboarding/skateboard-wiki/trucks/

↑ https://www.skateboardershq.com/does-skateboard-wheel-size-matter/

↑ https://www.skateboardershq.com/does-skateboard-wheel-size-matter/

↑ https://youtu.be/X8vx8zELaDs?t=17s

↑ https://www.rollerskatedad.com/10-tips-for-buying-the-perfect-roller-skate-wheels/#.XWRV5ZNKhZg

↑ https://shop.shredzshop.com/blogs/blog/a-beginners-guide-on-how-to-buy-a-skateboard/

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Today in History for 11th December 2019

Historical Events

1282 – Llywelyn ab Gruffydd/Llywelyn the Last, last native Prince of Wales is killed at Cilmeri, near Builth Wells, south Wales. Reigned from 1259.
1981 – El Mozote massacre: Salvadoran armed forces kill an estimated 900 civilians in an anti-guerrilla campaign during the country’s civil war.
1985 – Dow Jones closes above 1,500 for 1st time (1,511.70)
1986 – A Bartlett Giamatti becomes president of baseball’s National League
2017 – Rahul Gandhi, son of former Prime Minister Rajiv Ghandi, is elected leader of the Indian National Congress
2018 – Time Magazine Person of the Year 2018 is “the Guardians” journalists targeted for their work, including Jamal Khashoggi

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1863 – Annie Jump Cannon, American stellar spectroscopist (Harvard-classification), born in Dover, Delaware (d. 1941)
1915 – Anna van Beers [Graeve], Dutch actress (A Woman like Eve, Diary of a Hooker), born in Amsterdam, Noord-Holland, Netherlands (d. 2011)
1952 – Susan Seidelman, American film director (Desperately Seeking Susan), born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
1967 – Chris Shepherd, English film director, born in Anfield, Liverpool, England
1970 – Doug Nussmeier, American NFL quarterback (New Orleans Saints), born in Portland, Oregon
1981 – Hamish Blake, Australian comedian, born in Melbourne, Australia

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1524 – Henry Van Zutphen, Dutch protestant martyr, burned at stake
1747 – Edmund Curll, English bookseller (b. ca. 1675)
1972 – Semjon I. Kirsanov, Ukrainian poet (Zolushka), dies at 66
1987 – G. A. Kulkarni, Indian (Marathi) writer (RamalKhuna), dies at 1987
1993 – Ales Gartner, Slavic ski trainer of Norway, dies at 45
2004 – José Luis Cuciuffo, Argentinian footballer (b. 1962)

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How to Play Human Bingo

Getting to know other people can be tough, especially in a large group. Sometimes, just getting people to talk to one another can foster a social environment and make people feel more at ease. Human Bingo is a great icebreaker game to play with a group of 25 people or more. To start the game, make your Bingo sheets, hand them out, and let your players mingle with each other as they learn more about one another.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Making the Bingo Cards
Make a card with 5 x 5 boxes for each person at the gathering. Use a ruler to mark out blank boxes on a piece of paper. You can use a pen, pencil, or marker, as long as your lines stand out. Make a few extras in case more people show up.[1]
You can create a Word document on your computer with a grid and then print it out if you’d like to make these cards quickly.
Mark the center as a “FREE SPACE” to copy real Bingo. Just like typical Bingo, the center box is a “free space,” meaning that box doesn’t need to be marked off during the game. This is optional, and it can make your game go by faster.[2]
Fill in each blank box with a characteristic, life fact, or experience. The goal of this game is for people to get to know each other. Choose some situations or experiences that you think people at your gathering will be able to relate to.[3]For example:
Owns a pet
Likes anchovies
Speaks multiple languages
Has more than 4 siblings
Has never been on a plane
Has been to Hawaii
Rides a motorcycle
Plays a musical instrument
Was born in June
Does yoga
Plays football[Edit]Explaining the Rules
Hand out a Bingo sheet and a pen to each person. As the people of your gathering show up, have them grab a Bingo sheet that you made and a writing utensil. Make sure that every person gets an individual sheet.[4]
You can also pass out the sheets once everyone is sitting down and settled at your gathering.
Tell the group to sign people’s cards if they relate to a situation in the box. Explain to the group of people that they will be walking around and talking to each other. Have them ask other people if they can relate to the prompts in the box, and then sign or initial the box that they relate to.[5]
Have each person in the group only sign everyone’s sheet once. The goal of this game is to get to know one another, so the people in your gathering should talk to as many other people as possible. Each person should talk to at least 5 people to get enough signatures.[6]
Some people may relate to more than 1 situation in a box, but explain that they can only sign everyone’s sheet once.
Tell your players to shout “Bingo!” when they’ve gotten 5 signatures in a line. Just like classic Bingo, the game is over when someone gets 5 of their boxes “filled” with a signature. The row can be diagonal, horizontal, or vertical, but it must be a straight line.[7]
If you want to customize this game, have your players shout something besides “Bingo,” like your company name or the mascot of your school.[Edit]Starting and Stopping the Game
Tell everyone to “Go!” and begin the game. You can set a time limit for your players if you want to, but you don’t have to. With a large group, Human Bingo should take no longer than 15 minutes for someone to win.[8]
If you are leading the group, feel free to join in on the game. This will help you get to know your players better.
If your players feel awkward or the game is slow to start, try encouraging everyone with a small prize for the winner, like candy or extra credit points.
Stop the game when someone shouts “Bingo!” The first person to shout “Bingo” is the first potential winner. Have everyone pause when the first shout is heard.[9]
You can have everyone sit back down, or you can stay standing until the winner has been double checked.
Have the person who shouted read out their line of names and situations. In order to double check a winner, get them to read out the list of names that they have in a line. Use a blank Bingo sheet of your own to see if they line up.[10]
Get the people who signed each situation to elaborate on why they signed. This game is all about getting to know other people. If the person who shouted “Bingo!” is a winner, have the 5 people whose signatures are in a line explain why they signed which box.[11]
For example, if Tom Smith signed a box that said “Loves spicy food,” ask Tom how spicy he can tolerate and what his favorite spicy food is.[Edit]References↑ https://www.icebreakers.ws/large-group/did-you-know-bingo.html

↑ http://www.howdoyouplay.net/icebreakers/how-to-play-people-bingo.html

↑ https://www.icebreakers.ws/large-group/did-you-know-bingo.html

↑ https://www.icebreakers.ws/large-group/did-you-know-bingo.html

↑ http://www.instruction.greenriver.edu/esolfac/course_materials/L6/GettingStarted/Human_Bingo.pdf

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUvmHEd7oqU&feature=youtu.be&t=29

↑ https://www.icebreakers.ws/large-group/did-you-know-bingo.html

↑ https://www.icebreakers.ws/large-group/did-you-know-bingo.html

↑ http://www.howdoyouplay.net/icebreakers/how-to-play-people-bingo.html

↑ http://www.howdoyouplay.net/icebreakers/how-to-play-people-bingo.html

↑ https://www.icebreakers.ws/large-group/did-you-know-bingo.html

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