How to Raise Your Self Awareness

Becoming more self aware helps you understand your personality, values, and deepest desires. Additionally, learning more about yourself helps you create your best life and make positive changes to improve your weaknesses. Being self aware boosts your emotional intelligence, so it’s a valuable trait that might help you relate to others. Raise your self awareness by learning about yourself, building emotional awareness, and getting feedback from others.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Learning about Yourself
Rank your top 5-10 priorities so you know what’s important to you. Make a list of the things you most value in life, such as your family. Then, choose 5-10 items on your list that are most valuable to you. Rank them in order of importance, with 1 being your top priority. This helps you understand what’s truly important to you.[1]
For instance, your list might include 1) Your partner, 2) Your friends, 3) Your family, 4) Helping your community, 5) Self-expression.
Make a list of your personal goals to find what you want in life. Imagine your ideal life and what you would be doing. Then, write down what goals you’d need to accomplish to get your dream life. Rank these goals in order of importance so you know what you want to achieve in life.[2]
For instance, let’s say you dream of living by the beach and helping animals. You might set goals to move to a city near the beach, get a job at a vet clinic, and volunteer for an animal welfare group.
Identify your strengths and weaknesses. Knowing your strengths and weaknesses helps you understand yourself so you can live your best life. Discover your strengths by assessing your knowledge, skills, and traits. Additionally, think of 3-5 times when you felt most successful in life. Then, make a list of areas where you want to improve to find your weaknesses.[3]
For example, you might write down that you’re good at math, are a fast runner, and are creative.
As another example, you may decide that a time you felt most successful was when you helped your friend with their homework. This might help you realize that you’re good at teaching and enjoy helping others.
When it comes to weaknesses, focus on what you can improve. For instance, you might struggle with public speaking, which could be a weakness for you.
Take online psychometric tests to learn more about your personality. Do an online search for personality tests that can help you learn more about your personal traits, your learning style, and your strengths. Do several different tests to help you learn more about yourself. Keep a copy of your results so you can review them when you’re reflecting on yourself.[4]
For example, you might take an online test to find your Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, which helps you understand your personality.
You might also take quizzes to evaluate your verbal and numerical reasoning skills.
Write about your feelings and experiences in a journal. Journaling helps you better understand your thoughts and emotions. Set a goal to write in your journal every day, even if you just write a little. Discuss what’s happening in your life and how you feel. Then, review what you’ve written to help you self-reflect.[5]
To get the most out of your journaling habit, set a time to revisit your old entries. For instance, you might reread the prior month’s entries on the first weekend of the month.
Do your best to write every day. It’s okay if you only have time to write a quick list or jot down incomplete sentences.[Edit]Building Emotional Awareness
Allow yourself to feel your emotions so they pass. Part of self awareness is being able to understand your emotions. Acknowledge how you’re feeling and give yourself permission to experience the emotion. This allows your feelings to pass.[6]
Fighting or suppressing your emotions can make them boil over and makes it take longer for you to work through them. Be honest about how you feel and give yourself time to deal with it.
For example, you might feel sad after getting passed over for a promotion. Don’t try to fight the feeling! Tell yourself, “I’m sad right now because I thought I was going to get the job. It’s okay to feel this way.”
Incorporate stress relievers into your routine to prevent burn out. Stress is a normal part of life, but it can be harmful in large doses. When you’re under a lot of stress, you might not be able to deal with your emotions. To help you manage your stress, identify stress relievers that work for you. Then, incorporate them in your daily routine.[7]
For instance, you might call a friend after a stressful day at work, color in an adult coloring book to decompress, or take a warm bath to release the tension in your body.
Try out different stress relievers to see what works for you. Options include things like going for a walk, journaling, sipping on hot tea, playing with your pet, reading, or engaging in a hobby.
Determine what triggers you emotionally to understand yourself. Think about the times you’ve gotten really upset in the past. Then, identify what was happening in that moment. This is an emotional trigger that you have. Knowing your triggers helps you better manage your emotional reactions to them.[8]
For example, let’s say you blew up at your friend for yelling at a dog. You might realize that seeing people be mean to animals is an emotional trigger for you. In the future, you might take a deep breath and count to 10 before you address your concerns about how animals are being treated.
Use mindfulness to stay focused on the present moment. Mindfulness helps you stay grounded in the present so you aren’t worrying about the past or future. To be more mindful, engage your 5 senses of sight, sound, smell, touch, and taste. Here are some ways to do this:[9]
Sight: Describe what you see around you or focus on a specific color.
Sound: Notice the sounds you hear in your environment or turn on some music.
Smell: Pick out the smells around you or sniff an essential oil.
Touch: Feel the texture of an item or rub your hand on your skin.
Taste: Stick your tongue out to taste the air or chew a piece of gum.
Meditate for at least 10 minutes a day for a clear mind. Daily meditation helps you calm your mind so you can think better. Additionally, it helps you stay relaxed so you’re better able to control your emotions. For a simple meditation, sit in a comfortable position and close your eyes. Then, focus on your breath.[10]
If your mind wanders, bring it back to your breath.
Look for guided meditations online or use a free app, such as Headspace, Calm, or Insight Timer.[Edit]Getting Feedback from Others
Ask people whose opinions you value to give you feedback. Identify people in your life who you think will give you an honest, constructive evaluation of yourself. Then, ask them to tell you how they perceive you, what they think your strengths are, and how you can improve. Collect their feedback and review it to better understand yourself.[11]
For instance, you might send 5 of your closest friends and family members an email asking them for their opinion about you. You might ask the following questions: 1) What 10 words would you use to describe me? 2) What are my top 5 strengths? 3) What are 3 ways that I could improve myself?
Pay attention to how others react to you. Watch other people’s body language when they’re around you. Notice if they appear comfortable and approach you with ease or if they keep their distance or close themself off. Look for trends in how people act around you to get an idea about how you’re perceived.[12]
A person has open body language when they face you, keep their arms open or at their sides, and don’t cross their legs when sitting. They have closed body language when they turn away from your, fold their arms across their body, or cross their legs while sitting.
Keep in mind that how people act around you is partially based on their personality and what’s comfortable for them. Don’t assume that someone who is folding their arms in front of their body is offended by you. They might just be a nervous person.
Review the feedback you get at work or school. You probably receive regular feedback about your job performance or academic progress. Read the critiques or job reviews that you receive. Additionally, talk to your supervisor or instructor to ask questions or learn more about your progress. Then, implement the feedback to improve your performance.[13]
For example, read over your performance review at work. Similarly, review your grades and written comments on school assignments.
If your workplace or class doesn’t have built-in reviews, ask your supervisor or instructor to give you regular feedback. For instance, they might review your performance monthly or quarterly.
Get a friend to film you so you can watch yourself. Watching yourself on video allows you to view how others see your facial expressions and mannerisms. Ask your friend to make a video of you while you’re having a conversation or giving a presentation. Then, watch the video to see what you can learn about yourself.[14]
Ask your friend to film you during different activities. For instance, they might film you talking with a friend, interacting with an authority figure, and giving a presentation. This allows you to evaluate yourself in different scenarios.
It’s best to make several different videos at different times so you can watch yourself on different days.[Edit]Tips
Developing self awareness takes time, so be patient!
If you keep a journal, revisit it periodically to see how you’ve grown and changed over time.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Raise Breast Cancer Awareness
Develop Psychic Abilities
Communicate Your Weaknesses[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://hbr.org/2015/02/5-ways-to-become-more-self-aware

↑ https://hbr.org/2015/02/5-ways-to-become-more-self-aware

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/12-tips-to-improve-self-awareness-and-develop-your-potential/

↑ https://hbr.org/2015/02/5-ways-to-become-more-self-aware

↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/what-is-your-true-north/201509/know-thyself-how-develop-self-awareness

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/emotional-intelligence-eq.htm

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/emotional-intelligence-eq.htm

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/12-tips-to-improve-self-awareness-and-develop-your-potential/

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/emotional-intelligence-eq.htm

↑ https://hbr.org/2015/02/5-ways-to-become-more-self-aware

↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/what-is-your-true-north/201509/know-thyself-how-develop-self-awareness

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/emotional-intelligence-eq.htm

↑ https://hbr.org/2015/02/5-ways-to-become-more-self-aware

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/mental-health/emotional-intelligence-eq.htm

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Today in History for 12th December 2019

Historical Events

1408 – Order of the Dragon: The Order of the Dragon was first created on December 12, 1408 by Emperor Sigismund, then King of Hungary, and his wife Queen Barbara of Celje following the battle for possession of Bosnia.
1904 – CMS McClellan’s “Leah Kleschna” premieres in NYC
1925 – Medina surrenders to Saudi forces led by Sultan Abdulaziz Ibn Saud
1966 – US Supreme Courts votes 4-3 allowing Braves to move to Atlanta
1968 – Northern Ireland Prime Minister Terence O’Neill receives overwhelming support from Unionist Members of Parliament (MPs) at Stormont
1987 – Rollermania at Madison Square Garden, Eastern Express beats Midwest Pioneers

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1298 – Albert II, Duke of Austria, born in Habsburg Castle, Swabia (d. 1358)
1791 – Marie-Louise of Austria, Duchess of Parma and second wife of Napoleon, born in Hofburg, Vienna, Austria (d. 1847)
1906 – William Pahlmann, American interior designer (4 Season restaurant, NYC), born in Pleasant Mound, Illinois (d. 1987)
1913 – Ferenc Csik, Hungarian swimmer (Olympics gold medal 100m freestyle 1936), born in Kaposvár, Hungary (d. 1945)
1952 – Ajit De Silva, Sri Lankan cricket spin bowler (4 Tests), born in Ambalangoda, Sri Lanka
1991 – Daniel Magder, Canadian actor (The Famous Jett Jackson), born in Toronto, Ontario

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1889 – Viktor Bunyakovsky, Russian mathematician (b. 1804)
1965 – Johnny Lee, American actor (Song of the South, The Amos ‘n’ Andy Show), dies from a heart attack at 67
1971 – Jack Barnhill, Northern Ireland senator, assassinated
1985 – Anne Baxter, American actress, and singer (The Razor’s Edge, All About Eve), dies of a stroke at 62
2005 – Annette Vadim, Danish actress (b. 1936)
2018 – Meng Lang, Chinese poet and activist, dies at 57

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Prevent a Runny Nose

Even though it’s usually not a major problem, having a runny nose can still be very annoying! You might get a runny nose due to allergies, chilly weather, the common cold, or other conditions. Depending on the cause of your runny nose, there are numerous preventative measures you can try, including medications and lifestyle changes. With luck, you’ll be able to stop grabbing tissues all the time!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using General Prevention Strategies
Take simple measures to cut your chances of catching a cold. Not all runny noses are caused by the common cold, but having a cold nearly guarantees that you’ll be dealing with a runny nose. You can’t eliminate your risk of getting a cold, but you can improve your odds by taking steps like the following:[1]
Wash your hands frequently with soap and water.
Use hand sanitizer when you’re unable to wash your hands.
Don’t touch your eyes, mouth, or nose if you haven’t cleaned your hands first.
Avoid close contact with people who have cold symptoms.
Regularly disinfect surfaces like doorknobs and light switches.
Cover your face with a scarf when you’re out in the cold. The scarf will trap some of your body warmth and the warmth of the air when you exhale. This, in turn, will help to warm the incoming air before you breathe it in. Additionally, some of the moisture from the air you exhale will be trapped in the scarf. Breathing in air that’s warmer and moister will prevent your sinuses from producing as much moisture.[2]
Your nose runs when you’re in the cold because excess fluid is created when your nasal passages work to warm the incoming air.[3]
Use a humidifier when the air indoors is dry. Both outdoor and indoor air tend to be very dry during cold weather, and your sinuses may respond to the dry air by producing excess moisture. So, even if it’s not cold when you’re indoors, you may still get a runny nose unless you run a humidifier.[4]
Make sure to clean your humidifier regularly as directed. Otherwise, bacteria and mold may build up in the water reservoir.
Moisten your nasal passages with a saline nasal spray. Your sinuses naturally produce moisture when your nasal passages are dry, and may cause a runny nose by over-producing the moisture. Lubricating your nasal passages with saline can help slow down or stop this moisture production process.[5]
Follow the package instructions when using a saline nasal spray. They’re generally safe to use 3-4 times per day for up to 5 days. Talk to your doctor, if necessary, about using saline more frequently or for a longer period.
Hydrate your nasal passages by drinking lots of water. This works on the same principle as using a saline nasal spray. By hydrating your nasal passages by other means, you can prevent your sinuses from over-producing moisture to deal with dry nasal passages.[6]
Try drinking a glass of water when you wake up, when you go to bed, and before each meal, and take sips regularly throughout the day. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to have a drink.
Try a decongestant nasal spray or pill containing pseudoephedrine. Pseudoephedrine constricts the blood vessels in your sinuses, which reduces the production of moisture. While it can be an effective short-term measure, it also carries risks for side effects and drug interactions, and therefore isn’t a good option for everyone.[7]
For instance, people who have high blood pressure or take MAO inhibitors should not use medications containing pseudoephedrine.
Talk to your doctor or pharmacist about taking pseudoephedrine if you have any concerns.
Use the medication exactly as directed, for no more than 7 days (unless otherwise advised by your doctor).
Your runny nose may actually get worse than before as the medication wears off.
Maintain a healthy immune system to prevent getting sick. Staying healthy helps your body fight against bacteria and infection that cause runny noses.Adjust your diet to cut out processed foods so you can have healthier options rich in vitamins and minerals. If you don’t get enough vitamins or minerals in your diet, you can take supplements to increase your levels.
Talk to your doctor about using a prescription nasal spray. If OTC decongestant options aren’t working for you, your doctor may be able to prescribe a corticosteroid nasal spray. If so, use the spray exactly as prescribed.[8]
Let your doctor know about any other medications you’re taking, as well as any medical conditions you have. Prescription nasal sprays aren’t right for everyone.
Corticosteroid nasal sprays do not provide immediate relief. It can take up to 2 weeks for them to take effect. Therefore, they’re often best used as a long-term option.[Edit]Taking Allergy-Specific Measures
Visit your doctor so you can pinpoint your allergens. Your doctor can run allergy tests to help identify the specific allergens that cause your runny nose and other symptoms. Once you’ve determined your allergens, you can take more effective measures to avoid or counteract them.[9]
Allergy testing can involve skin tests, blood tests, or both. With skin tests, small amounts of common allergens are applied to your skin to test for a reaction. Blood testing provides less immediate results, but can be more effective at identifying some allergens.
Limit your exposure to the allergens you’ve identified. Using an air purifier in your home can help remove irritants from the air, but avoiding your trigger allergens altogether is also important. For instance, if cigarette smoke is an irritant for you, steer clear of situations where you’ll encounter it.[10]
Some allergens are nearly impossible to completely avoid. Ragweed pollen, for example, is very prevalent in the U.S. Use weather and/or air quality reports to determine when and where ragweed pollen concentrations are highest.
Pollen counts tend to be higher early in the morning, so stay indoors and keep your windows closed in the morning if pollen is a trigger for you.
If dust mites are a trigger, reduce the amount of carpeting, blankets, and other dust-collecting fabrics in your home, clean often using a vacuum with a HEPA filter, and run an air purifier.
Dust your home regularly to get rid of common irritants. Dust in your home can create irritation that causes your nose to run. Take time once a week to dust the surfaces all of the surfaces in your home, such as tables, shelves, ceiling fans, and desks. Focus on cleaning your bedroom thoroughly since dust in your bed could cause allergic reactions. If you want to get dust out of carpet, then vacuum it as well as you can.[11]
Change your bed sheets once every 1-2 weeks to prevent dust from building up in them.
Make your bed and cover your pillows during the day so dust doesn’t settle on your sheets.
You can reduce the amount of airborne dust in your bedroom with a HEPA air filter.
Wear a pollen-blocking mask when you can’t avoid allergens. If you have pollen allergies and need to mow the lawn or simply go for a morning walk, wearing a mask can prevent the allergens from entering your mouth or nose. A scarf may help a little, and a surgical mask is a better choice. For the best results, though, use a respirator mask with an N95 or higher rating (in the U.S.).[12]
Allergen masks are widely available online.
Take antihistamines as recommended by your doctor. These medications reduce your body’s production of histamine in response to allergens, which in turn will reduce your symptoms, such as a runny nose. Over-the-counter (OTC) options include Benadryl, Allegra, Zyrtec, and Claritin, among many others, but it’s best to consult your doctor before choosing an OTC antihistamine.[13]
Your doctor may instead recommend a prescription-strength antihistamine. As with OTC antihistamines, take the medication exactly as directed.
Antihistamine side effects can include abdominal pain, constipation, dry eyes/mouth, drowsiness, and headache, among other possibilities. Discuss the potential for side effects with your doctor.
In some cases, your doctor may determine that allergy shots are your best course of action. These injections are meant to slowly acclimate your body to particular allergens.[14]
Give natural antihistamines a try. These home remedies typically have little to no scientific backing, but they’re also usually harmless to try. Consider options like the following:[15]
Foods with supposed antihistamine properties. These include (but may not be limited to) citrus fruits, berries, cantaloupes, kiwi fruits, apples, pineapples, broccoli, peppers, tomatoes, red and yellow onions, cauliflower, yogurt, kefir, green tea, and black tea.
Turmeric. Heat a mixture of turmeric powder and linseed oil on the stove until it starts lightly smoking, then gently inhale a small amount of the smoke.
Ginger. Try steeping of fresh sliced ginger in of hot water, and drinking it while it’s warm.[16]
Mustard oil. Heat a dollop of mustard in a pan with some water until it simmers, then gently inhale a small amount of the vapor.[Edit]Addressing a Chronic Runny Nose
See your doctor to determine the cause of your chronic runny nose. Allergies aren’t the only condition that can cause a chronic runny nose. Instead of (or in addition to) allergies, your doctor may be able to diagnose a condition such as the following:[17]
Nonallergic rhinitis.
A deviated septum.
Chronic sinusitis.
Nasal polyps or tumors.
A foreign object lodged in the nasal cavity.
A cerebrospinal fluid leak—a rare, serious condition in which some of the fluid surrounding your brain is leaking through your nasal passage.
Discuss surgical options with your doctor as needed. If you have a nasal tumor or polyps, a foreign object lodged in your nasal cavity, or a deviated septum, surgical intervention may be your best alternative. You’ll definitely need surgery if you have a cerebrospinal fluid leak, although this is a very rare condition.[18]
If you have allergic or nonallergic rhinitis that won’t respond to other treatments, your doctor may recommend a surgical procedure that severs some of the nerves in your nose that trigger fluid production.
Discuss the potential risks and benefits of any surgical procedure before deciding if it’s right for you.
Use nonallergic rhinitis treatments as advised. If your chronic runny nose isn’t caused mainly by allergies, then nonallergic rhinitis is the most likely cause. If this is your diagnosis, discuss treatment strategies with your doctor. In addition to common runny nose remedies, these may include:[19]
Prescription anticholinergic nasal spray.
Intranasal cryotherapy, which essentially freezes some of the nasal nerves that trigger fluid production.[Edit]References↑ https://www.cdc.gov/features/rhinoviruses/index.html

↑ http://www.everydayhealth.com/healthy-living/why-does-your-nose-run-when-its-cold.aspx

↑ http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=99844567

↑ https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/12342-common-cold/management-and-treatment

↑ https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003049.htm

↑ https://www.henryford.com/blog/2019/05/6-things-you-should-know-about-chronic-runny-nose

↑ https://www.drugs.com/pseudoephedrine.html

↑ https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/patientinstructions/000404.htm

↑ http://acaai.org/allergies/treatment/allergy-testing

↑ https://www.henryford.com/blog/2019/05/6-things-you-should-know-about-chronic-runny-nose

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-to-clean-for-dust-allergy

↑ http://healthliving.today/allergy-mask/

↑ http://www.drugs.com/drug-class/antihistamines.html

↑ http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000813.htm

↑ https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323276.php

↑ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4488566/

↑ https://www.henryford.com/blog/2019/05/6-things-you-should-know-about-chronic-runny-nose

↑ https://www.henryford.com/blog/2019/05/6-things-you-should-know-about-chronic-runny-nose

↑ https://www.henryford.com/blog/2019/05/6-things-you-should-know-about-chronic-runny-nose

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