How to Install Metal Roofing

Metal roofing is becoming very popular because it adds durability, beauty, and helps reduce the energy costs of your home.[1] This type of roofing is available in a wide array of colors, textures, and styles, and can suit anyone’s aesthetic preferences. Install your own metal roofing to add efficiency and style to your home while saving money at the same time.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Readying Your Roof
Measure the area. Before you can begin to update your roof, you will have to get an accurate measurement and order your materials. Always try to measure from the ground first in order to keep yourself safe. If you must climb onto the roof to measure the space, be sure to use caution.[2]Find out the slope of your roof. The slope is given as rise-over-run, meaning the distance up over the distance over. This measurement will typically be a measurement over , something like 4/12 or 8/12. Convert this to the equivalent in degrees and as a decimal.
Use the slope factor to determine the area of the roof. Measure the area (length x width) on the ground, and then multiply this by the slope (in decimal form). This means the slope factor form is: length x width x slope. This will give you the number of square feet that need to be covered.
For example, if your roof measures x and the slope of the roof is 12/12 (45 degrees, which converts to 1.414 in decimal form), you would multiply 10 x 10 x 1.414, to get the total of 141 square feet of roofing.
Find the square footage for the entirety of your roof, and add up the total to find out how much metal roofing you need to order.
Allow for a minimum of 10% waste (extra roofing).
Get your materials. You will most likely have to order the roofing metal in the amount and color specific to your house. You will also need a large garbage can, a jigsaw or power metal shear, a staple gun, a drill and assorted drill bits, 1¼ inch roofing nails, metal roofing screws, and self drilling, self-sealing wood screws.[3]
Prepare a work site. In order to make your installation as easy as possible, it is important to have a well-organized work area. You will need a large bin for trash (old roofing and debris), a place for tools, and your scaffolding or ladder set up.[4]Make sure that if you are using electric tools that none of the chords are in the way.
Store the material in a readily accessible area, protected from the weather. The panels are weather-proof but staining can occur if left open to moisture
Remove the old roofing. Although you can install corrugated metal roofing over shingles, for the best foundation it is recommended that all the old roofing be removed. Work at a slow and steady pace, not trying to rip-up or carry-off too much old roofing at once.[5]Start from the highest, furthest point and take up all the old shingles, flashing, vents, and boots. You should be replacing all these with the new metal roofing.
If you come across any large nails that are sticking out, either remove them and put them in your debris container or hammer them in deep so that they aren’t a danger to anyone working.
If you need to reposition your gutters, do so at this point.
Always remove the old roofing on a day (or set of days) when the weather is expected to be dry and sunny, as you don’t want any rain or moisture to seep into your building.
Repair any damage. With the old materials removed, the bare bones of the roof frame or plywood sheathing will be exposed. If there is any damage to the sheathing (the wood under the shingles), insulation, or ventilation, fix it now.[6]
Add your insulation layer. This helps to block out moisture from getting trapped between the metal roof and the sheathing. Use roofing felt to cover the entirety of the roof and secure it with a staple gun or nails.[7][Edit]Installing Your Roofing
Install the edging. The edging, or eave flashing, is metal strips that are used to cover the perimeter of the roof. Use your 1¼ inch nails to secure the flashing to the roof. It should overlap the edge of the gutter (if you have them).[8]
Add the metal panels. Always begin working at the longest peak to eave point of the roof. Take your first sheet of metal and place it on the roof so that it overhangs the edge at least ¾ of an inch. This panel must be aligned perpendicular (square) to the edge.Use your neoprene washer head screws to secure the metal to the sheathing. Space the screws about apart down the entire piece of metal.
Make sure that the screws are all aligned evenly, as you will be able to see them from the ground if they are exposed-fastener metal plates.[9]
For exposed fasteners, avoid over tightening the fastener. Each fastener has a durable rubber grommet that seals the roof from the weather. Tighten the fastener just enough to seal the site. If you over tighten and the grommet is displaced, remove and replace.
Continue installing the metal panels, making sure that the edges overlap at lease one inch, or as required, with the adjacent panel. Do this until the entire roof is covered. If you feel the need for sealants, lay a bead of 100% silicone or adhesive silicone before laying the sheet down and make sure the bead is towards the edge of the bottom sheet. This will allow the silicone to squeeze out towards the edges, making it a more tight seal.
Add the flashing. This is the metal trim similar to the eave flashing, except that it is placed over joints in the roof where different sections meet. This should be used in valleys (points where two sections less than 140 degrees meet) and as end caps over the tops of two sides that meet. Be sure to cut this metal at the correct angle before installing it.The flashing can be bent into a ‘V’ shape to fit over the top of a section (ridge) of a roof, if necessary.
Depending on how wide the flashing you’re using is, you will either have to use one or two rows of screws.
Finish your roof. Make sure that you’ve completely covered the entire roof with the metal, that all edges are smooth and finished, and that there are no loose pieces. Clean up all remaining metal, nails, and screws and enjoy your new roof![10].[Edit]Tips
If your roof has sky lights or a chimney, consider hiring a professional to help you with that section.
Your new metal roof may be installed over shingles if the deck is good and a vapor barrier is used such as felt paper or tar paper.[Edit]Warnings
If you did not install gable trim it may void any wind resistance warranty.
The edges of metal roofing materials can be very sharp, so always wear thick safety gloves while doing any work.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Measure a Roof
Install Corrugated Metal Roofing
Install a Steel Roof
Replace a Flat Roof[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.bobvila.com/articles/381-metal-roofs-on-the-rise/

↑ https://www.roofingcalc.com/how-to-measure-and-estimate-a-roof-like-a-pro/

↑ https://www.familyhandyman.com/roof/how-to-roof-a-house/

↑ https://www.nsc.org/Portals/0/Documents/NSCDocuments_Advocacy/Divisions/Falls-From-Heights/Standing-Seam-Metal-Roofs.pdf

↑ https://www.familyhandyman.com/roof/roof-repair/roof-removal-how-to-tear-off-roof-shingles/

↑ https://www.roofcalc.org/importance-of-tearing-off-old-roof-shingles-and-repairing-plywood-sheathing/

↑ https://www.iko.com/na/pro/building-professional-tools/learn-about-roofing/the-purpose-of-roofing-felt/

↑ https://www.familyhandyman.com/roof/drip-edge-roofing-fix/

↑ http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/bennett126.html

↑ http://home.howstuffworks.com/home-improvement/repair/how-to-install-metal-roofing.htm

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Today in History for 14th December 2019

Historical Events

1900 – France and Italy sign a secret agreement by which Italy recognizes France’s right to exploit Morocco in return for France’s conceding her the same right in Tripoli
1901 – 1st table tennis tournament is held (London Royal Aquarium)
1950 – Baseball owners choose Lou Perini (Braves), Phil Wrigley (Cubs), Del Webb (Yankees), and Ellis Ryan (Indians) to select new commissioner
1975 – WCPR (Brooklyn New York pirate radio station) begins broadcasting on 1620 AM
2016 – University of Toronto scientists present findings of the world’s oldest water – 2 billion years old from a mine in Canada
2017 – The Vatican announces it has rediscovered the lost last paintings of Raphael in Vatican Museum, painted 1520

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1904 – Jack Westland, American politician (US House of Representatives 1953-65) and golfer (US Amateur C’ship 1952), born in Everett, Washington (d. 1982)
1911 – Spike Jones [Lindley Armstrong Jones], American bandleader (Der Fueher’s Face, Cocktails For Two), born in Long Beach, California (d. 1965)
1935 – Butch [David William] White, English cricketer (England opening attack Brown and White v Pak 1961), born in Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire
1942 – David Band, British banker (BZW) (d. 1996)
1948 – Boudewijn Büch, Dutch writer and TV host, born in The Hague, Netherlands
1963 – Cindy Gibb, American actress (Search for Tomorrow, Youngblood), born in Bennington, Vermont

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Famous Deaths

1417 – John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham, English nobleman, hanged and burned
1542 – James V, King of Scotland (1513-42), dies at 30
1651 – Pierre Dupuy, French historian and scholar, dies at 69
1923 – Giuseppi Gallignani, composer, dies at 72
1965 – Hermann Sandby, composer, dies at 84
1998 – Norman Fell, American actor (Three’s Company, The End, Graduate), dies of bone marrow cancer at 74

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How to Make Christmas Tree Decorations

Sick of store-bought Christmas ornaments? Want to add a little individual flair to your tree? Or just looking for a fun Christmas project for you and your family? You’ve come to the right place! This article will provide you with some great homemade ornament ideas, all of which are low-cost and easy to make. Happy crafting!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Making Easy DIY Decorations
Spray paint pine cones. Collect some pine cones – large or small – and spray paint them gold or silver. Attach a piece a ribbon to the top and hang from your tree. Alternatively, roll the pine cone in some glue and then in some glitter for a sparkly finish!
Make a popcorn and cranberry garland. Take a needle and some strong thread (nylon or waxed cotton), a bowl of air-popped popcorn and a cup of cranberries. Thread the needle, making a large knot from the end. Begin sewing the popcorn and cranberries onto the thread, alternating between each, or using any pattern you like. Make a large knot at the end of the string. Hang on your indoor Christmas tree or, even better, on an outside tree to provide a tasty treat for the birds! [1]
Make Lego presents. This is an easy one for kids to make! Assemble some large Lego pieces to form a square or rectangular present shape. Take a length of colored ribbon and tie it around the Lego, making a bow on top. Place your Lego presents under the tree or hang them from the branches!
Make a gumdrop snowflake. Take one large, ball-shaped gumdrop and stick six toothpicks into it, at regular intervals. Stack a selection of smaller gumdrops onto each toothpick until they are full. Attach a ribbon for hanging on the Christmas tree, or simply balance the gumdrop snowflake on a branch.[2]
Make a jigsaw Rudolph. Grab five jigsaw pieces (two of which slot into each other) and paint them light brown. Take one piece of jigsaw to form the base, and glue the two attached pieces to the bottom half. This will be Rudolph’s face. Take the remaining two jigsaw pieces (unattached) and glue them to the top half of the base piece to form the antlers. Glue a circle of red felt (or a red gumdrop) to the bottom of the jigsaw to form a nose, along with two googly eyes. Attach a ribbon to the back for hanging.
Make cinnamon bundles. Take five or six cinnamon sticks and form a bundle. Tie with a piece of red or green ribbon and make a bow on top. Hang from the branches of the Christmas tree for a pretty and fragrant ornament!
Make a photo cube. Buy a wooden/foam/cardboard cube, then print out six christmas photos (you, friends, trees, etc.) Cut the photos to the right size for each side. Using glue (hot glue is best), paste the photos onto each side of cube. Attach a string to hang. If you want, you can write on one side.[Edit]Making Salt Dough Ornaments
Gather the ingredients and equipment. To make your salt dough ornaments, you will need one cup of plain flour, half a cup of salt and half a cup of water. You will also need Christmas themed cookie cutters (stars, Christmas trees, angels, wreaths, etc.) a cookie sheet, a rolling pin, some toothpicks, ribbon, and acrylic paints and glitter glue for decorating.
Make the salt dough. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, salt and water and stir until it forms a dough. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and knead until smooth. If the dough is too sticky, add a little more flour — though not too much, as this will cause the dough to crack.
Use cookie cutters to cut out shapes. With a floured rolling pin, roll out the dough until it is about in thickness. Use your Christmas themed cookie cutters to cut out shapes in the dough. Place each shape on a floured surface as you cut out the rest of the dough.
Make holes in each ornament for hanging. Before you bake your ornaments, you will need to make a little hole at the top of each where you can thread a ribbon to hang the ornament from your tree. Use a toothpick to make punch a hole near the top of each ornament, rotating the toothpick a little to make the hole wide enough for your ribbon to fit through.
Bake the ornaments. Place your salt dough ornaments on a floured cookie sheet and place on the middle shelf of an oven preheated to . Bake for two hours, then remove from the oven, place on a wire rack and allow to cool completely.
Decorate. Once the salt dough ornament have cooled, you can decorate them using the acrylic paints and glitter glue. Depending on personal preference, you can use a small paint brush to paint on intricate details, or you can simply cover the decoration in one block color. You can also glue on sequins, button and crystals for extra decoration.
Thread the ribbon. Cut a length of ribbon – preferably in red, green or white – and thread it through the hole at the top of the ornament. Secure with a knot and hang from the tree. If you like, you can write the date on the back of the ornament to remember when you made it![3][Edit]Making Felt Snowman Ornaments
Gather your materials. To make your felt snowman ornament you will need pieces of felt in white, brown, orange and black. You will also need a piece of white ribbon (approximately 5 inches in length), a sewing needle and thread (in colors matching the felt), a pen, a scissors, some polyester fiberfill and a sheet of paper.
Cut out the body of the snowman. Draw the outline of a snowman onto the sheet of paper. Make the snowman whatever shape you like — two snowballs high, three snowballs high, fat, skinny — it’s up to you.
Cut the paper snowman outline, then place it on a piece of white felt.
Use your pen to trace the outline of the snowman onto the felt, then cut it out with the scissors.
Trace another snowman outline onto a second piece of felt and cut that one out too.
You should now have two identical snowman outlines.
Cut out the snowman’s arms and facial features.
Cut out five small circles from the piece of black felt. These will form the snowman’s eyes, along with his three coal buttons.
Cut out a small triangle from the orange felt. This will form the carrot for the snowman’s nose.
Cut out two stick shapes from the brown felt. These will be the snowman’s arms.
Sew on the snowman’s eyes, nose and buttons. Take one of the white felt snowman outlines and hand-stitch the eyes, carrot nose and coal buttons into place. Use thread of a corresponding color for each piece, i.e. orange thread for the nose, and black thread for the other pieces.
Assemble the snowman.
Take the two white felt body pieces and line them up, placing the piece with the sewn-on features on top.
Take the brown felt arms and place them between the two body pieces, sticking out at an angle.
Take the length of white ribbon, fold it over, and insert the end between the two body pieces at the top of the snowman’s head. This will form the hanging loop for the finished ornament.
Sew it all together. Take your needle and some white thread and hand-stitch the two body pieces together, leaving a seam allowance of only .
As you’re stitching, make sure to catch both of the snowman’s arms and the looped thread in a stitch, in order to secure them in place.
Don’t stitch the entire snowman closed just yet; leave a space of about to an inch open at the bottom.
Stuff the snowman. Take your polyester fiberfill and stuff it into the snowman, making him nice and plump. Once you’ve done this, you can finish the snowman by stitching the snowman closed. Hang your jolly felt snowman on the Christmas tree and admire your handiwork![4][Edit]Making Glitter Ball Ornaments
Collect some clear glass ornaments. They can be any size you like, just make sure that they have easily removable tops.
Remove the tops and pour in a little floor wax. Gently remove the tops from the glass ornaments (you don’t want to damage them) and pour a small amount of floor wax or floor finish into the glass ball.
This may sound strange, but this is what allows the glitter to stick to the inside of the ball. Just make sure the product you use is acrylic based and clear drying.
Gently swirl the product around the inside of the ornament, making sure the entire inside surface is coated in floor wax.
Once you’re done, you can pour the floor wax back into the bottle. Waste not, want not!
Grab a selection of different colored glitters. Pour a substantial amount of your chosen glitter into the glass ornament and swirl it around until the glitter completely covers the interior of the ornament. Shake any excess back into the container of glitter.
You can choose any colors you like –gold, silver, red, blue, green, purple — whichever ones go with the color scheme for your tree.
If you want to be really wild, you could even try mixing a few different colors for a real disco ball effect.
Replace the top. Once the glitter has dried, you can replace the top of the ornament. Use a little to secure it in place if it feels in any way loose.
Decorate the outside. If you like, you can leave the glitter ball ornaments as they are. Alternatively, you can decorate the outsides using snowflake- or star-shaped scrapbook stickers and some diamante sequins.[5][Edit]Making Clothespin Snowflake Ornaments
Take eight wooden clothespins. Eight wooden clothespins will make one snowflake ornament. Carefully separate each clothespin, removing the metal springs.
Glue the two halves of each clothespin together. Take some hot glue or wood glue and stick the flat sides of each clothespin together. Take a piece of ribbon, fold it in half, and insert both ends between two of the wooden pieces before you glue them. This will allow you to hang the ornament later.
Make the snowflake. Assemble the snowflake as follows:
Take two of the glued-together pieces and align the flattened edges at the top to form a right-angle. Attach two more pieces to form an X shape.
Take the remaining four glued-together pieces and stick one in between each right angle. You should now have a snowflake.
Paint the snowflake. Paint the snowflake using white or gold spray paint. Paint with a slight, glittery shimmer can look very nice. Stick sequins or jewels onto the ornament as you see fit.[6][Edit]Printable Snowman Template
WH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5df4503144eec’)Snowman Template
[Edit]Tips
If your tree does not come pre-lit, pick up some lights and string them.
Another great thing is to pick up some fake snow spray and spray that on the tips of your tree. Also get some candy canes and hang them on the tree.
Try to make this a family activity and have fun!
Get all of the supplies you need for making D.I.Y. decorations at a craft store, or check out your local dollar store or Walmart.[Edit]Warnings
Be careful with the tacks and metal hooks.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Make Christmas Ornaments with Dough[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-make-a-popcorn-cranberry-garland.html

↑ http://www.parents.com/holiday/christmas/crafts/handmade-gifts/#page=10

↑ http://theimaginationtree.com/2011/12/easy-salt-dough-ornaments.html

↑ http://www.bhg.com/christmas/crafts/make-a-frosty-friend/

↑ http://theornamentgirl.com/blog/being-crafty/how-to-make-glitter-christmas-ornaments-diy/

↑ http://www.bystephanielynn.com/2011/12/clothespin-snowflakes-handmade-ornament-no-25.html

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