How to Reduce Holiday Travel Stress

The holidays can be stressful even without having to travel. Traveling around holiday time can amp up your stress levels, especially if you’ve got a family of your own. Manage your holiday stress by planning ahead and getting things taken care of well in advance before you leave. Do what you can to make your travels pleasant and safe. When traveling with kids, take special considerations for their needs. While the holidays may be stressful, do what you can to lower that stress as much as possible.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Planning Ahead
Write lists. You might think, “There’s no way I’ll forget that!” and yet, under stress, you may forget even the most basic things. Write a list of what needs to be bought, packed, accomplished, and arranged before you leave. Start well in advance so you don’t get stuck doing loads of laundry the day you leave.[1]
Let someone else look over the list to make sure that you haven’t forgotten anything.
Put reminders where you need them. For example, write a list of bathroom items you need and put it on your bathroom mirror so that you can collect all of the items at once.
Put sticky notes onto necessary items you need to bring or put a list of things you need on the door.
Make arrangements ahead of time. If you need to find a pet sitter, do this well before you leave on your trip. If you are running out of your prescription medication, get a refill prior to leaving. Take stock of any arrangements that must be made before you leave for your trip and take care of them before you go. It’s best to take care of any details before traveling so you don’t have to think about them while you are away.
Pay your bills and run any errands that are vital before leaving.
Organize your things. You might be packing your stuff, your children’s things, and gifts for other people. Staying on top of that many things can be difficult, so use a bit of organization. Pack your suitcase with clothes ahead of time and make sure everything fits well. Chose simple, lightweight clothing and fold your clothes in a way that saves space in your suitcase.[2] Decide whether to wrap the presents before or after traveling.
If you’re traveling in a car, consider having a bag within reach with certain items you may want or need on your journey.
For heavy or bulky items, such as shoes or coats, choose one to take. Make sure the rest of your clothing matches this one item.
Plan for likely hazards. If you’re on a schedule (like catching a bus, train, or airplane), plan for potential hazards to getting there. Plan ahead for traffic, running late, or toddler tantrums.[3] Especially if you are traveling with children, prepare for any emergencies by having snacks, a change of clothes, and any other necessary items that might come in handy while traveling.
Whether you’re on an airplane or in a car, have snacks for any passengers that may get grumpy without food. Avoid sweets, as blood sugar spikes and crashes can make people grumpy.
Bring clothing for various temperatures, and plan to layer. Even if it might be hot at your destination, bring a sweater in case there is air conditioning or a cold breeze.
Choose flights (or airlines) with minimal delays. If you’re traveling around holiday time, opt for airlines that aren’t known for lengthy delays or canceled flights. If you find a flight with a very short layover, opt for a longer layover (or pay a bit extra for a direct flight) in order to avoid the hassle of potentially missing a flight.[4]
Consider purchasing flights that depart early in the day. Airports tend to be less crowded and if you need to make changes, it may be easier to get a different flight.[5]
[Edit]Getting Through Your Travels
Keep essential items nearby. Whether you flying or driving, have your necessary things close to you. Keep your medical prescriptions and necessary toiletry items in your carry-on bag. Bring an extra change of clothes in case your baggage gets lost. If traveling by car, have a specific bag set aside for overnight essentials.[6] Keep blankets and pillows nearby to keep your journey more comfortable.
If traveling with kids, pack toys and items to keep them entertained and busy.
Prepare your car. If you’re driving a long distance, make sure your car is ready for the journey. Get an inspection by a mechanic you trust and get an oil change. Make sure your tire tread is good and that your car is in good overall condition. If you anticipate bad weather, prepare for these conditions by ensuring the safety of your car.[7]
Get new headlights, fog lights, windshield wipers, or snow tires.
Have something to look forward to. If you tend to dread traveling, pack a special treat for you to enjoy. For example, splurge on a special snack to eat or a book to read. Find an audiobook that appeals to you and save it for your travels.[8]
Having something to look forward to can make your travels feel less like a hassle.
Be lighthearted. You’ll likely come into at least one travel snag. Instead of getting upset or bent out of shape, keep your sense of humor and go with the flow. Be flexible and recognize that not everything goes according to plan. Sometimes disasters happen and you need to be willing to change your plans. If this happens, maintain your sense of humor and find a way to approach it without getting upset.[9]
If you find yourself becoming stressed or panicked, find a quiet place to be by yourself for a few minutes. This might be a bathroom or the courtyard of your hotel. Take deep breaths, and relax your muscles to prevent yourself from becoming upset.
Practice relaxation. If you’re feeling overly stressed, find a healthy outlet for stress, such as relaxation. Find things that help to relax you, such as listening to music, writing, or reading. Use relaxation before you take off and during your trip. If you need some alone time, let others know that you need a quick break and will be back.[10]
Find ways that help you feel calm. This could be calling a friend, taking a bath, writing in a journal, or going for a walk.
Avoid taking out your stress through drugs, alcohol, or other destructive means. Instead, find healthy and constructive ways to cope. For more information, check out How to Deal With Stress.
[Edit]Traveling with Kids
Give kids plenty of warning. If you’re going to visit family, let your kids know ahead of time. If your child fears change or has a difficult time adjusting to new people or places, give them plenty of time to prepare for the trip. Talk about who you will be seeing, what you’ll be doing, and what activities you can look forward to on your trip.[11]
Make a travel book for your child, letting them see pictures of who they are visiting and what activities they will be doing. Provide some blank pages for your child to use to draw or color. This can help build positive anticipation instead of worried or nervous dread.
If flying, let your kids know that you will go through security. Let children over the age of 12 know they will need to take their jackets and shoes off. Children under 12 can leave on light jackets, head coverings, and shoes.[12]
You can even make a game of practicing going through security, complete with pretend “tickets” and suitcases.
Rehearse what children should do if you are separated. You should prepare your child so that they know how to find help if you are separated during your vacation. Roleplay these situations before you leave so that they know how to act.[13]Teach them your phone number, and practice dialing it with them. Also teach them how to dial 911 or how to reach emergency services in the country you are visiting.
Teach them how to recognize police officers. If you are going to a foreign country, make sure you look up what police wear in that country.
Give them a piece of paper with your hotel and contact information on it. They can give it to a police officer or official trying to help.
Take advantage of early boarding. If flying, ask about family boarding. Many airlines allow families with young children or multiple kids to board earlier than other passengers. This can help you get you and your family situated without dealing with the crowds of people on the plane. [14]Use the extra time to get your children sitting and occupied. Get out your toy bag and snack bag and stow the rest of your bags.
Take out some gum, and give it to them to chew during take-off and landing. This will prevent their ears from popping. If you have a baby, a bottle will do the same trick.
Coach kids on acceptable behavior. If children are attending an event or visiting family, let them know what behavior is expected of them. Even as you travel, be clear in how you want the kids to behave. For example, say, “We use our inside voices when inside a hotel because we need to respect other people’s vacations, too.” If you’re flying, say, “You might get bored or nervous when you’re on the airplane. If you feel this way, let me know. It’s not okay to whine or scream inside an airplane.”[15]
Let children know what kind of behavior is expected before you leave on your trip. If necessary, remind them of your expectations. Say, “Remember we talked about excusing yourself from the dinner table.”
Give kids a job. Giving your child a “job” while on vacation can help them feel involved and invested in your plans. These jobs should be simple and fun for the child. Some things they can do include:
Take pictures on a disposable camera.
Pick out postcards and gifts for family members.
Carry the map or guidebook.
Choose what to do on a certain day.
Set aside time before and after your travels. If you feel rushed before heading out, plan to take some time off work so you can properly prepare for your travels. Consider working a half day and using the time to run errands, pack, and feel ready before you head off. Getting everything prepared and ready can help reduce stress and make you feel more calm, which feels much better than running around trying to get things done.[16] Especially with kids, you might want some time to decompress.
Consider having a day to yourself (or at least without any plans) after your travels to help you recuperate and get back into the swing of things.This will also let kids rest up before they have to return to school.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Travel Without Stress
Reduce Stress
Relieve Flying Anxiety
Be Mindful During the Holidays
Reduce Your Holiday Spending
Be Organized During the Holidays
[Edit]References↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-practice/201610/11-tips-reducing-holiday-travel-stress

↑ http://www.containerstore.com/tip/view/top10travel

↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-practice/201610/11-tips-reducing-holiday-travel-stress

↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-practice/201610/11-tips-reducing-holiday-travel-stress

↑ http://psychcentral.com/lib/dont-stress-holiday-travel/

↑ http://psychcentral.com/lib/dont-stress-holiday-travel/

↑ http://psychcentral.com/lib/dont-stress-holiday-travel/

↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-practice/201610/11-tips-reducing-holiday-travel-stress

↑ http://www.vacationkids.com/Vacations-with-kids/bid/226867/10-Tips-To-Keep-Family-Vacations-Stress-Free

↑ http://www.helpguide.org/articles/stress/stress-management.htm

↑ http://www.ahaparenting.com/parenting-tools/traditions/Summer-Family-Activities-Vacation

↑ https://www.tsa.gov/travel/special-procedures/traveling-children

↑ http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/what-to-do-when-you-and-your-child-get-separated

↑ http://www.parents.com/fun/vacation/planning/traveling-with-kids-checklist/

↑ http://www.ahaparenting.com/parenting-tools/traditions/Summer-Family-Activities-Vacation

↑ http://www.vacationkids.com/Vacations-with-kids/bid/226867/10-Tips-To-Keep-Family-Vacations-Stress-Free

Read More

Today in History for 19th December 2019

Historical Events

1788 – Chinese troops occupy capital Thang Long Vietnam
1945 – Jean Giraudoux’ “La Folle de Chaillot” premieres in Paris
1960 – Frank Sinatra’s 1st session with Reprise Records (Ring-A-Ding-Ding)
1993 – “Red Shoes” closes at Gershwin Theater NYC after 5 performances
2000 – Ballon d’Or: Real Madrid’s Portuguese midfielder Luís Figo is named best football player in Europe ahead of Juventus midfielder Zinedine Zidane and Milan striker Andriy Shevchenko
2010 – “Miracle at the New Meadowlands”, Philadelphia Eagles trail New York Giants by 21 points with eight minutes to play, before scoring 4 touchdowns in final 7 minutes, including dramatic walk-off punt returned for a touchdown by DeSean Jackson

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1922 – Catherine Hall, British nurse who raised the professional profile of nursing and to establish its central role in health care, born in Sheffield, England (d. 1996)
1944 – Richard Leakey, Kenyan paleoanthropologist, conservationist and politician, born in Nairobi, Kenya
1948 – Ken Brown, Canadian ice hockey player
1969 – Scott Pearson, Cornwall, NHL left wing (Buffalo Sabres)
1969 – Kristen “Kristy” Swanson, American actress (Knots Landing, Buffy the Vampire Slayer), born in Mission Viejo, California
1970 – Jon Cleveland, Canadian 100m/200m swimmer (Olympic bronze 1992, 96), born in Fresno, California

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1815 – Robert Hudson, composer, dies at 83
1848 – Emily Brontë, English novelist (Wuthering Heights), dies of tuberculosis at 30
1939 – Karl Wagenfeld, Low German writer (Lucifer, Death and Devil), dies at 70
1944 – Rudolph Karstadt, German entrepreneur (b. 1856)
1994 – Noel Pointer, jazz violinist, dies at 39
2012 – Amnon Lipkin-Shahak, Israeli military leader, dies from cancer at 68

More Famous Deaths »

Read More

How to Make Dreidel Marshmallow Pops

Marshmallow dreidel pops are colorful and festive treats perfect for a Chanukah party! Dreidel pops are made by sticking a Hershey’s kiss to the bottom of a marshmallow, then piercing the top of the marshmallow with a pretzel stick to give it the shape of a spinning top. After making the basic form of the dreidel pops, you can decorate them by coating them in blue candy melts, then adding on the Hebrew letters so that they look like real dreidels! Because marshmallow dreidel pops require minimal cooking and are easy to assemble, they are the perfect activity to do with a child to teach them more about Chanukah and the game of dreidel!

[Edit]Ingredients
12 large marshmallows
12 thin pretzel sticks
12 Hershey’s Kisses
1 package of blue candy melts
1 bar of white chocolate[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Making the Base of the Marshmallow Dreidels
Stick pretzels into the marshmallows. To begin making the marshmallow dreidels, take one of your thin pretzel sticks and stick it into the flat side of a marshmallow, pressing it into the marshmallow until it is about ¾ of the way through the marshmallow. Make sure that it is pressed far into marshmallow, but doesn’t fully pierce through it.[1]
Use short, thin pretzel sticks as opposed to large, thick ones.
Melt a square of white chocolate. Break off one square of white chocolate from the bar, then place the square in a microwaveable bowl and microwave it for 20 seconds or until melted.[2]
Dip a Hershey’s kiss in the white chocolate. Unwrap a Hershey’s kiss, then dip the bottom in the white chocolate. Only use enough chocolate to coat the bottom of the kiss.[3]
The white chocolate will act as a kind of edible glue that will stick the Hershey’s kiss to the marshmallow.
Attach the Hershey’s kiss to the marshmallow. After you dip the bottom of the Hershey’s kiss in the chocolate, press the sticky side of the Hershey’s kiss into the bottom of a marshmallow, the flat side opposite from the side with the pretzel. Press the Hershey’s kiss against the marshmallow for around 15-20 seconds to help it stick in place.[4]
Repeat the process of dipping the Hershey’s kisses in the chocolate, then sticking them to the bottom of the marshmallows.
Freeze the dreidels for 15 minutes. After you have finished sticking the kisses to the marshmallows, place the dreidels on a plate or a baking sheet and put them in the freezer for 15 minutes. Freezing the dreidel pops will help them set so that the Hershey’s kisses stay stuck to the bottom of the marshmallows.[5][Edit]Making the Hebrew Letters
Melt the rest of the white chocolate. While the dreidels are in the freezer, you can make the Hebrew letters that adorn the outside of the dreidels. To start making the letters, break the remaining bar of chocolate into squares, then place the squares in a bowl.[6]
Microwave the white chocolate in 20 second spurts, taking out the chocolate and stirring it in between each microwave session. Stop microwaving when the chocolate is melted, as over-microwaving can cause the chocolate to scald.
Pour the chocolate into a plastic bag. Wait until the chocolate is around room temperature, then pour it into a plastic sandwich bag. You may have to scrape the bowl to get out all the chocolate. After all the chocolate is in the bag, snip off one of the bottom corners, making a small cut.[7]
Cut off only a tiny corner, so that the bag can function as a kind of frosting piper.
If you have a frosting piper, you can also simply pour the chocolate in the piper bag.
Pipe the Hebrew letters on wax paper. Spread a piece of wax paper on a counter or tabletop. Hold the bag of melted chocolate in both of your hands, then slowly squeeze the bag until the white chocolate starts to come out of the snipped corner in a thin line.
Pipe out each of the four Hebrew letters that are found on a dreidel: Nun, Gimel, Hey, and Shin. Refer to other dreidels you may have at home or pictures of dreidels online if you are unsure of what these letters look like.[8]
Make 12 sets of the four Hebrew letters. You will eventually stick one set on each of the 12 marshmallow dreidel pops you are making.
Nun and Gimel are similar-looking letters, so make sure to add the heel of the Gimel, which differentiates it from the more rounded Nun.
Place the chocolate letters in the freezer. After you finish making all 12 sets of letters, put the wax sheet of letters in the freezer while you work on the dreidels. Freezing them will help the letters to harden.[9][Edit]Decorating the Marshmallow Dreidels
Melt the candy melts. Open the package of candy melts and pour them into a microwaveable bowl. Then microwave them for 1 minute on 50% power. Take the candy melts out from the microwave and stir for about 10 seconds. Then microwave them for 30 seconds on 50% power and stir. Microwave them one more time for 30 seconds on 50% power. Stir the candy melts for 1-2 minutes until they are completely melted.[10]
You can also melt candy melts in a double broiler. Place an inch (2.54 cm) of water in the bottom of a double broiler, then place the candy melts in the top of the broiler. Place the double broiler on medium heat. Stir the candy melts continuously until they have completely melted.
Add vegetable shortening if necessary. Candy melts often melt into an extremely thick mixture, so thick that if you dipped a spoon into it, the candy melt mixture would glob onto the spoon instead of drip off. If your mixture is extremely thick and hard to stir, add a tablespoon (14.7 ml) of vegetable shortening and stir until the shortening is integrated and the candy melt mixture is smooth.[11]
Ideally, if you dip a spoon in the candy melt mixture, you want the mixture to stick to the spoon and slowly drip off.
If your candy melt mixture is already the right consistency, you don’t need to add the vegetable shortening.
Dip the marshmallow dreidels in the candy melt mixture. Lay down a piece of wax paper on the counter next to the bowl of candy melt mixture. Take the dreidels out of the freezer and one by one, then dip each dreidel into the blue candy melt.[12]
Hold the dreidel by the pretzel handle and dunk it in so that the entire marshmallow and Hershey’s kiss base is submerged.
After you dunk the dreidel , take the dreidel out and hold it above the bowl, letting any excess candy melt drip off. Then lay the dreidel down on its side on the sheet of wax paper. Repeat until each dreidel is coated in the blue candy melt!
Reserve the excess candy melt.
Let the candy melt set on the dreidels. Set aside the dreidels for about 30 minutes to let the blue candy melt set on the outside of the dreidels. If you want to speed up the process, stick the dreidels in the freezer for about 15 minutes.[13]
Scrape up the chocolate Hebrew letters. While the candy melt sets on the dreidels, take the sheet of chocolate Hebrew letters out of the freezer. Carefully peel the letters from the wax paper with your fingers, or use a knife like a spatula to unstick the letters from the wax paper.
Take your time unsticking the letters, as they are quite delicate and can easily break.
Attach the Hebrew letters to the dreidels. Once you have scraped up the Hebrew letters and the candy melt has set on the dreidels, use a toothpick to transfer some excess candy melt to the back of a Hebrew letter. Then stick the letter on one face of the marshmallow dreidel pop.[14]
Stick the next three letters on the remaining three sides of the dreidel, then carefully set the dreidel on one side and let the letters set.
Repeat until all the dreidels have Hebrew letters on each side.
Let the dreidels sit for about half an hour so that the letters can set. Then the dreidel pops should be ready to eat![Edit]Tips
You can leave off the step of creating and adding the Hebrew letters if you wish, the marshmallow pop will still look like a dreidel!
Learn the game of dreidel and play with your dreidel marshmallow pops![Edit]Souces and Citations
__↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ https://www.craftsy.com/blog/2013/04/how-to-melt-candy-melts/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

↑ http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/marshmallow-dreidels/

Read More