How to Wash Smartwool Socks

Smartwool is an American clothing company that specializes in clothing made out of Merino wool. Their socks are well-known for holding up over time while remaining comfortable and easy to care for. You can wash your Smartwool socks by hand or machine. If you wash them by machine, turn them inside out before washing them and use the lowest temperature setting at the lowest available speed. To dry your socks, you can either air dry them or throw them in the dryer. If you use the machine to dry them, use the lowest temperature available.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using a Washing Machine
Turn your socks inside out. Reach inside each of your socks and grab them from the inside of the fabric. Pull the edge of each sock away from you while holding the inside to turn them inside out. Since the fabric on the inside of your socks is more resilient than the stitching on the outside, turning your socks inside out when you wash them will preserve them for a longer period of time.[1]
Using a washing machine is the preferred method according to the manufacturer.
Throw your socks in with your standard laundry or wash them alone. Feel free to simply wash your Smartwool socks alongside your other laundry. There’s no need to separate them or wash them alone. However, you can wash your Smartwool socks separately if you don’t have any other laundry that you want to wash on the gentle cycle in cold water. Place your Smartwool socks in the washing machine.[2]
If you choose to wash your socks with your other laundry, consider putting them in a laundry bag to avoid getting the fabric caught on a zipper or button.
You should still separate your laundry. Wash white socks with white clothing and darker socks with your colors.
Add mild laundry detergent to your machine. If you’re washing your socks with other clothes, use the measuring cap that comes with your laundry detergent to determine how much soap you need to add to the drum. If you’re washing the socks on their own, add of mild detergent to your washing machine depending on how many pairs of socks you’re washing.[3]
Do not use bleach or fabric softener. Bleach will permanently destroy your socks. Fabric softener will coat the Merino fibers with residue, which will make them less breathable in the future.
Set your washing machine to the gentle cycle and run with cold water. Turn the dial on your washer to the “gentle” setting. On some machines, this setting is labelled “delicates” or “low power.” Turn the dial until the indicator is pointing at the lowest-power setting available. Turn the knob to set your water temperature to cold. Run your washing machine to wash your socks.[4]
If you wash your Smartwool socks on high heat, you may shrink them.
There are other Smartwool products, like some of their sweaters, that can be washed with warm water. Read the tag on each of their individual products to find care instructions.[Edit]Handwashing Your Socks
Wash your socks by hand if you’re worried about shrinking or unraveling. While machine-washing Smartwool socks is perfectly fine, there’s always some risk involved when it comes to using a washing machine or dryer. Handwashing your socks ensures that your socks maintain their shape and that no loose threads unravel in the machine.[5]
This is a good option if you have other small, wool products that require hand washing and you want to clean all of your wool at once.
Fill a sink with cold water and get a mild detergent. Clean your sink with soap and a sponge if it’s dirty. Rinse the soap away and plug your drain with the stopper. Turn the cold water on. Fill your sink with enough water to completely cover your socks. Get a mild laundry detergent to clean your socks.[6]
Depending on how many socks you’re washing, your bathroom sink may be too small for this and you may need to do this in the kitchen. If your kitchen sink isn’t big enough either, grab a clean bucket to do this.
You can use a wool or cashmere shampoo if you want, but there’s nothing wrong with using a mild laundry soap.
Mix your soap into the water and submerge your socks. Once you sink is filled, pour of your mild detergent into your sink. Mix the soap into the water by hand or use a spoon to mix it. Take your socks and submerge them in the water.[7]
Push your socks down a little if they’re floating near the surface to ensure that every part of your socks gets wet.
Massage your socks gently for 30-45 seconds then let them soak. Softly rub your socks by hand, using both hands to squeeze and massage your socks. Rub them for 30-45 seconds to remove any dirt or grime that is embedded in the fabric. Let your socks soak in the soapy water for 4-5 minutes to completely clean them.[8]
Rinse the soap out of the socks using cold water. After your socks have soaked, pull the plug at the bottom of the sink to drain the excess water. Turn the cold water on and run your socks under the stream for 2-3 minutes. Turn your socks around in the water to rinse every section of the fabric. Squeeze the socks gently to remove the excess water.[9]
Do not wring the water out of your socks. Squeezing or pulling on your socks can cause them to lose their shape.
If you’re handwashing your socks, air drying is the best option when it comes to drying them. The entire point of handwashing is to preserve the shape and fabric, and machine drying is more likely to damage your socks.[Edit]Drying Your Socks
Lay your socks flat on a drying rack to preserve their shape. Whether you used a machine or washed your socks by hand, air drying your socks is always the safest option. Take your Smartwool socks and set them out on a drying rack so that they’re laying entirely flat across the rack. Let your socks air dry for 3-4 hours or until they’re entirely dry.[10]
How long it takes to air dry your socks depends entirely on how wet they are when you set them out and what the air circulation in the room is like.
Air drying your socks is better for the environment. You’ll also preserve energy by not using the drying machine!
Tumble-dry your socks on the lowest setting available, if in a rush. While air drying is safer for your Smartwool socks, they can easily be dried in the dryer. After handwashing or machine-washing your socks, place them inside of the dryer. Set the dryer to the lowest temperature setting and lowest tumble speed by turning the corresponding knobs. If you only have automatic settings on your particular machine, use the “delicates” or “low heat” setting to dry your socks.[11]
You can dry the socks on their own or with your other wet laundry.
Don’t forget to clear out your lint trap before you turn your dryer on!
Avoid hanging your socks vertically or letting them hang. If you’re air drying or storing your socks, always lay them flat. If you hang them over a shower rod or use clothespins to hang them on a clothing line, gravity will put strain on the fabric of your socks while they dry. This can cause them to lose their shape over time as you continue to hang them as they dry.[12][Edit]References↑ https://www.smartwool.com/discover/how-to-wash-wool-socks.html

↑ https://www.smartwool.com/discover/how-to-wash-wool-socks.html

↑ https://www.smartwool.com/discover/how-to-wash-wool-socks.html

↑ https://www.smartwool.com/discover/how-to-wash-wool-socks.html

↑ https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/house-and-home/household-advice/a666777/can-i-machine-wash-hand-wash-only-items/

↑ https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/uk/house-and-home/household-advice/a666777/can-i-machine-wash-hand-wash-only-items/

↑ https://youtu.be/DzclZ5vRZxU?t=29

↑ https://youtu.be/DzclZ5vRZxU?t=50

↑ https://youtu.be/DzclZ5vRZxU?t=115

↑ https://www.smartwool.com/discover/how-to-wash-wool-socks.html

↑ https://www.smartwool.com/discover/how-to-wash-wool-socks.html

↑ https://www.smartwool.com/discover/how-to-wash-wool-socks.html

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Today in History for 21st December 2019

Historical Events

1960 – Ornette Coleman records his influential album “Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation”, establishes the name for the Free Jazz sound
1976 – Patricia R Harris named secretary of HUD
1980 – Harold Carmichael ends NFL streak of 127 consecutive game receptions
1987 – 3 white NY teens convicted of manslaughter in death of a black man
1987 – Vladimir Titov and Musa Manarov launched
1995 – The city of Bethlehem passes from Israeli to Palestinian control.

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Famous Birthdays

1853 – Isolde Kurz, German poet and short-story writer (Meine Mutter), born in Stuttgart, Germany (d. 1944)
1895 – Paul Hoffer, German composer, born in Barmen, Germany (d. 1949)
1919 – Gert Fredriksson, Swedish canoeist (6 Olympic gold 1948, 52, 56, 60), born in Nyköping, Sweden (d. 2006)
1938 – Larry Bryggman, American actor (Dr John Dixon-As the World Turns), born in Concord, California
1961 – Ryuji Sasai, Japanese video game composer, born in Osaka Prefecture, Japan
1964 – Keith Taylor, NFL safety (Washington Redskins), born in Pennsauken Township, New Jersey

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Famous Deaths

1736 – Alessandro Galilei, Italian architect (Cappella Corsini), dies at 45
1824 – James Parkinson, English physician (First description of Parkinson’s disease) and political activist, dies at 69
1873 – Francis Garnier, French explorer, dies at 34
1967 – Stuart “Stu” Erwin, American actor (The Stu Erwin Show), dies of heart attack at 64
1998 – Karl Denver, Scottish singer (b 1931)
2013 – Lars Edlund, Swedish composer, dies at 91

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How to Exfoliate Skin

Seeing dull skin in the mirror can be frustrating, but exfoliating regularly can help you look your best! Your skin renews itself every 28 days, and it’s normal for dead skin cells to build up. Exfoliation removes your dead skin cells to reveal youthful skin. Use a chemical exfoliator or scrub to exfoliate your face and body. Additionally, choose an exfoliator that’s best for your skin type.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Scrubbing Your Face
Apply your exfoliator by making circular motions with your fingers. Put a quarter-size amount of your chemical exfoliator or scrub on your fingertips. Then, rub it across your face with circular motions. [1]
Rinse off the exfoliator with cool water and pat your face dry. Splash the water over your face until all of the product is removed. Use cool water to shrink the look of your pores. Then, blot your face dry using a soft, clean towel.[2]
If you used a scrub, make sure that you don’t have any granules in your hair line or stuck on your skin. It can be hard to remove all of the exfoliator.
Apply moisturizer to your face to soothe your skin. Your skin might feel a little dry or tight after you exfoliate, so it’s best to moisturize your skin. Use facial lotion immediately after you exfoliate to add moisture back to your skin. Choose a moisturizer that’s formulated for your skin type. Then, massage about a dime-sized amount of it into your skin.[3]
If you use a face serum, apply the serum before you use your moisturizer.
Exfoliate your face 2-3 times a week. Your skin will look its best if you exfoliate it regularly. At a minimum, it’s best to exfoliate your skin twice a week. If your skin tolerates it well, exfoliate 3 times per week.[4]
If you have sensitive skin, you may only be able to exfoliate once a week. Try 2-3 times per week but reduce how often you exfoliate if your skin is red, dry, or itchy.
The best time of day to exfoliate is in the morning. Your skin renews itself at night, so the morning is the best time to scrub away your dead skin cells.[5]
Pick a chemical exfoliator with an acid for a less abrasive option. A chemical exfoliator is gentler than a manual exfoliator so it’s less damaging to your skin. Look for a product that says it’s a chemical exfoliator. Additionally, read the label to make sure your product contains glycolic acid, lactic acid, beta hydroxy acid, or salicylic acid, which are popular exfoliators. You can use these types of exfoliators as a regular face wash.[6]
You may be able to use a chemical exfoliator daily, but start with 2-3 times per week to see how your skin tolerates it.
Read the label on your exfoliator and follow the instructions for the product you chose.
Use a commercial scrub or make your own if your skin tolerates it. Scrubs are manual exfoliators that slough off your top layer of skin. These types of exfoliators are great for removing your dead skin cells but can irritate your skin because they’re abrasive. Try a scrub if you like the smooth, polished feel they give you.[7]
A salt or sugar scrub will be milder than a scrub that has plastic beads or ground up nuts.
You can make your own salt or sugar scrub by adding 2 tsp (8 g) of salt or sugar to your regular cleanser. As another option, combine of coconut oil, 2 tbsp (24 g) of sugar, and of lemon juice to make a homemade facial scrub.[Edit]Picking the Right Exfoliator for Your Skin
Choose any exfoliator that feels comfortable if your skin is normal. Your skin should tolerate most exfoliators, but it might get irritated if you use a manual scrub. For best results, try a chemical and manual exfoliator, but use them on different days. This will help you get the benefits of both without stressing your skin.[8]
For instance, you might use a chemical exfoliator on Sunday and a manual scrub on Wednesday.
If you exfoliate 3 times per week, you could use a chemical exfoliator on Sunday and Tuesday, then use your scrub on Friday.
Apply a strong chemical exfoliator or use a scrub if you have oily skin. Some chemical exfoliators are stronger than others. Look for a product that has BHAs listed on the label or a high percentage of AHAs. Alternatively, use a manual face scrub to slough off your dead skin cells.[9]
You will likely be able to exfoliate 3 times a week if you have oily skin.
Use a washcloth and chemical exfoliator on dry, sensitive, or acne-prone skin. Look for a mild chemical exfoliator like glycolic acid or lactic acid. Apply it to a washcloth for more exfoliation. Then, gently scrub your face once or twice a week to remove your dead skin cells.[10]
If your skin gets irritated, apply the product with your fingers instead of a washcloth.[Edit]Exfoliating Your Body
Use an exfoliating body wash to exfoliate in the shower daily. Look for a body wash that has a chemical exfoliator or a manual exfoliator, like sugar, salt, or plastic beads. Since the skin on your body is thicker, it’s okay to use a stronger exfoliator and to exfoliate more often. Scrub yourself with your exfoliating body wash every day to keep your skin looking soft and smooth.[11]
If your skin feels dry or irritated, decrease how often you use your body wash. Try using it 2-3 times a week.
Exfoliate with a sugar or salt scrub weekly to polish your skin. If you want your skin to be really soft and smooth, use a manual exfoliator once a week to improve your skin. Wet your skin, then massage the scrub into your body before you shower. Start at your shoulders, then rub the exfoliator into your skin down to your toes. Pay special attention to your elbows, knees, and ankles where skin tends to build up.[12]
If you don’t use an exfoliating body wash, it’s okay to use a body scrub twice a week, if you like.
You can purchase a commercial body scrub or make your own. For a simple body scrub, combine equal parts brown sugar or salt with coconut oil, almond oil, or sweet almond oil.
Make short, light strokes if you use a dry brush or sponge. A brush or scrub allows you to easily exfoliate your skin without a product. Use your brush or sponge daily before you shower while your skin is dry. Start at your shoulders and work your way down to your feet. Move the brush or sponge across your skin in short, light strokes to remove your dead skin cells.[13]
Using the brush or sponge can irritate your skin, especially if it’s sensitive. If this happens, use your brush or sponge once a week or switch to a different exfoliator.
Apply moisturizer after you exfoliate to nourish your skin. It’s normal for your skin to feel dry or itchy after you exfoliate. Fortunately, you can relieve this by applying a body lotion or cream. Slather your favorite moisturizer over your body as soon as you get out of the shower.[14]
Use about a shot glass of body lotion or cream to cover your entire body. However, use more if necessary.[Edit]Warnings
Ask your dermatologist for a prescription exfoliator if your skin gets irritated.[15]
Don’t exfoliate your skin if you have a cut, wound, or sunburn. It can cause irritation or further damage.[16]
Exfoliating your skin too often can damage it. Start with once or twice a week, then reduce how often you exfoliate if your skin gets irritated.[17][Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-often-you-should-exfoliate-your-face

↑ https://stylecaster.com/beauty/how-to-exfoliate/

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-often-you-should-exfoliate-your-face

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-often-you-should-exfoliate-your-face

↑ https://www.glamour.com/story/whats-the-deal-with-exfoliatin

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://stylecaster.com/beauty/the-dos-and-donts-of-exfoliating-your-body/

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-often-you-should-exfoliate-your-face

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

↑ https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/skin-care/exfoliation

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