How to Water Succulents

Succulents are a type of plant that retains water in arid or dry conditions. They’re a popular choice of indoor plant because they’re exceptionally easy to take care of and require a small amount of effort when compared to other popular plants. To water a succulent, first check to see if it really needs water by checking to see if the soil is dry or the leaves are softening up. If it does need water, give it enough water to soak the soil without allowing puddles to form on the surface of the dirt. Remember, it’s always better to underwater a succulent than to overwater it, so be conservative when it comes to the amount of water you give your plants.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Determining If Succulents Need Water
Feel the soil near the base of the plant to see if it’s moist. Overwatering your succulent is more dangerous for the health of the plant than underwatering, so you need to really make sure your plant needs water before soaking it. Start by putting your finger into the soil near the base of the plant. If the soil is totally dry, it may need more water. If it’s even partially moist, you don’t need to water your plant.[1]
Squeeze a leaf on your succulent to see if it’s firm. Succulents store their water in the leaves, so you can determine whether a succulent needs water or not based on the thickness and elasticity of the leaves. Gently put your fingers on the tip of a leaf near the top of your plant and give it a soft squeeze. If it feels mostly firm, you’re good. If the leaf feels soft or mushy though, the plant likely needs more water.[2]
If you notice discoloration alongside soft and mushy leaves, it is likely very dehydrated and on the verge of dying.
If the leaves are shriveling or getting wrinkly, the plant is probably entirely out of water. Give it some water immediately to try and bring it back.
Look at the tips of the leaves to see if they’re discolored. On some species with thinner leaves this is a better indicator that the plant needs water.
Inspect the succulent’s structure to see if it’s slumping over. Look carefully at the central stem of the plant to see if it’s leaning over. Study the branches to see if they’re starting to droop over or shrink. Shrinking, bending, and leaning are all signs that your plant needs water. If the overall shape and structure of your plant looks solid, it may not need any water.[3]
This may be hard to do with smaller succulents where you can’t notice big changes in the shape of the plant.
Check your succulents to see if they need water once a week. Succulents usually don’t need water more than once a month. Check your plants weekly to see if the soil is dry, the leaves are healthy, and the structure is solid. If a plant doesn’t look like it needs water, feel free to wait an additional week before checking again.[4]
Don’t worry about your plant if it’s 2-3 weeks before it needs water. Some succulents only require water once a month! Even if they do run out of water during the week, most succulents can store water for multiple days before they start to dry out.
You may notice some succulents requiring more water in the spring. This is typically the period of the year where succulents grow.[Edit]Giving Succulents Water
Fill a watering can with room-temperature tap water. Take a watering can and rinse it out if it’s dirty. Then, fill it with standard tap water from your sink or a hose. You can distill the water or use rain water if you’d like, but there isn’t a ton of evidence that it makes a big difference for the health of the plant.[5]
You won’t need a ton of water, but it doesn’t really hurt anything to fill the watering can up.
If you’re watering potted plants indoors, take the plants to the tub or sink so that they can drain without ruining your windowsill.
Pour the water around the soil of the plant for 3-4 seconds. Tilt your watering can over and pour water around the base of the plant. Water the soil directly—do not pour the water on top of the succulent—and avoid watering it directly where the stem of the plant meets the soil. Move your watering can’s spout in a circle around the soil for 3-4 seconds and lift it up.[6]
Succulents absorb water from the soil, not the leaves. If you pour water over the plant, all you’re doing is making it harder for the plant to breathe.
Check the soil to see if it’s still partially dry. After you lift the spout of your watering can, wait 3-5 seconds for the water to soak into the soil. Inspect the top of the soil and put the pad of your finger in a section that you didn’t water directly. Tap the soil lightly with your finger to see if it’s moist. If it is, you’ve given your plant enough water. If it’s still pretty dry, you probably need to give the succulent more water.[7]
The soil needs to be thoroughly moist before you can stop watering. Check multiple sections of the soil to confirm that it has received enough water.
If your succulents are in the ground, check the soil around the plant.
Continue watering the soil for another 2-3 seconds if necessary. If some of the soil is still dry, lean the spout of your watering can over again and continue watering the plant. Give it water for another 2-3 seconds before checking your plant again. Repeat this process as necessary until the soil surrounding the succulent is wet.[8]
If you’re watering an indoor succulent, let the plant drain for 10-15 minutes before putting it back on its tray.
Place the plant’s base in a tray of water if you’re nervous about overwatering. Some people prefer to water their succulents indirectly to avoid overwatering the roots. To do this, fill a tray bigger than your plant’s container with of water. Set your plant’s container in the tray and leave it for 2-3 minutes. The plant’s soil will absorb the water up through the drainage hole at the bottom of the container.[9]
This method is not preferred since it’s impossible to tell whether your plant has received enough water or not.
Wait until the soil completely dries out before watering again. There is no standard answer to how often to water mature succulents. This will depend on the plant variety, the soil, the ambient humidity, and other factors. Generally, you should water more often in the summer when the plant is actively growing than in the winter when the plant goes into semi-dormancy with shorter days.[Edit]Reviving a Dying Succulent
Stop watering the plant if it’s wilting while the soil is wet. If you notice that the leaves are falling over and wilting when you’ve been watering it regularly, this is a sign that the plant has been overwatered and can’t hold all of the water in the leaves. Stop watering it for 3-4 weeks and see if the succulent recovers at all.[10]
If you have a jade plant, the leaves will bloat up and become exceptionally thick if it gets overwatered.
Water the plant more frequently and mist the base of the stem if it has dried out. If the leaves on your succulent seem discolored and dried out, your plant isn’t retaining enough water. Give it a thorough watering and use an empty spray bottle to mist the base of the plant where the stem meets the soil to give it a quick influx of water.[11]
Check your plant 1-2 days after giving it some emergency water. If the soil has dried back up in this time frame, give it another watering.
Give your plant more sunlight if leaves fall off. If the plant’s soil is moist, the plant looks healthy, and you still have leaves falling off, it’s a sign that your succulent isn’t getting enough sun. Move the location of your plant so that it’s closer to a window and see if the problem resolves itself. It may also help to move the plant to an east-facing window so that the plant gets plenty of sunlight in the morning.[12]
Move the plant away from the sunlight if it’s developing white and brown specks. If your succulent looks structurally sound but has a bunch of white or brown specks, your plant is getting sunburned! Some tropical succulents are designed to only be in filtered sunlight and will get dried out in a ton of direct sun. Move the plant away from the window and see if the color comes back to your plant over the course of a week.[13][Edit]Things You’ll Need
Watering can
Water[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.reviewjournal.com/life/home-and-garden/three-clues-indicate-when-succulents-need-watering-214468/?returnUrl=https://www.reviewjournal.com/life/home-and-garden/three-clues-indicate-when-succulents-need-watering-214468/?clearUserState=true&clearUserState=true

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↑ https://www.bhg.com/gardening/houseplants/care/how-to-water-succulents/

↑ https://kansashealthyyards.org/component/allvideoshare/video/how-to-water-succulents-and-cacti

↑ https://kansashealthyyards.org/component/allvideoshare/video/how-to-water-succulents-and-cacti

↑ https://kansashealthyyards.org/component/allvideoshare/video/how-to-water-succulents-and-cacti

↑ https://kansashealthyyards.org/component/allvideoshare/video/how-to-water-succulents-and-cacti

↑ https://www.reviewjournal.com/life/home-and-garden/three-clues-indicate-when-succulents-need-watering-214468/?returnUrl=https://www.reviewjournal.com/life/home-and-garden/three-clues-indicate-when-succulents-need-watering-214468/?clearUserState=true&clearUserState=true

↑ https://www.firstforwomen.com/posts/how-to-save-a-dying-succulent-166195

↑ https://www.firstforwomen.com/posts/how-to-save-a-dying-succulent-166195

↑ https://www.firstforwomen.com/posts/how-to-save-a-dying-succulent-166195

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Today in History for 29th December 2019

Historical Events

1782 – 1st nautical almanac in US published by Samuel Stearns, Boston
1848 – Gas lights 1st installed at White House (Polk’s administration)
1920 – Yugoslav government bans communist party
1955 – NHL officials wear new vertically striped black-and-white sweaters for the first time in Montreal Canadiens’ 5-2 win over Toronto Maple Leafs
1968 – NFL Championship, Cleveland Municipal Stadium: Baltimore Colts shutout Cleveland Browns, 34-0
2018 – 85th Orange Bowl: #1 Alabama beats #4 Oklahoma, 45-34

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Famous Birthdays

1833 – John James Ingalls, US politician (Rep-Ks), born in Middleton, Massachusetts (d. 1900)
1866 – Joseph Limburg, Dutch lawyer and politician, born in The Hague, Netherlands (d. 1940)
1917 – Tom Bradley, Mayor of Los Angeles (D-1973-93), born in Calvert, Texas (d. 1998)
1953 – Gali Atari, Israeli singer and actress, born in Rehovot, Israel
1959 – Ritsuko Okazaki, Japanese singer-songwriter (Kanashii Jiyū / Koi ga, Kiete Yuku), born in Hashima Island, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan (d. 2004)
1965 – Dexter Holland, American musician (The Offspring), born in Garden Grove, California

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Famous Deaths

1141 – Yue Fei, Chinese general, executed
1847 – William Crotch, English composer, dies at 72
1975 – Euell Gibbons, American outdoorsman and proponent of natural diets (b. 1911).
1996 – Willaim Brown, British TV executive, dies at 67
1996 – Mireille Hartuch, singer/songwriter, dies at 90
1998 – Jean-Claude Forest, writer and illustrator of comics (Barbarella) (b. 1930)

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How to Open a Champagne Bottle with a Sword

Amaze everyone at your next social function by opening a bottle of champagne (or any sparkling wine) with a sword. This technique is also known as “sabering” or “sabrage.” Teaching yourself to “behead” a bottle of champagne isn’t hard, but takes a little practice (and several bottles of cheap bubbly) to perfect.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Setting Up Your Equipment and Space
Understand the nature of glass champagne bottle. The key to opening a champagne bottle with a sword is the pressure in the bottle.
Because of the way champagne is packaged, the carbon dioxide creates roughly 35 pounds of force pushing against the cork at all times.
Glass is brittle. That means that it breaks instead of bending when it is damaged.
Scoring the surface of the glass bottle will cause it to crack, and the force inside will cause the collar of the bottle and the cork to fly off.[1]
Buy several bottles of champagne. You will likely not get this right on the first try, so you will need backup bottles. This trick even works on cheap champagne though, so there’s no need to splurge on your practice bottles.
Sparkling wine also works well.
In general, French and Spanish champagne tends to come in thicker bottles than American champagne. It may also be more expensive. Thicker glass works better than thin, but if you’re operating on a budget, American champagne will also work.
This trick typically takes half to a full a case to master. Plan on making at least a $30 investment to learn (6 x $5 bottles). Practice with inexpensive, corked sparkling wine. Note that some inexpensive bottles are cheaply made from inferior glass, which can lead to a higher rate of breakage and are therefore riskier to work with.
Get a sword. It doesn’t have to be terribly sharp. Really, any sturdy knife will work. Of course, a sword is the most dramatic and flashy!The best knives and swords for sabrage are thick and sturdy. The sides should be as flat (parallel to each other) as possible.
You may want to practice with a sturdy kitchen knife before investing in a fancy sword.
Keep your eye out in thrift stores, yard sales, and estate sales, and you could find a sword for a reasonable price.
You can find champagne swords made specifically for this purpose online. [2]
Chill the champagne. The colder the neck of the bottle is, the better.You may want to chill the neck in a bucket of ice water right before sabering.
Be very careful not to shake the champagne.
Don’t chill it in the freezer. You’ll ruin the flavor, and it could explode. [3]
Find an open space. Outside is best. This trick is going to create flying objects and spill champagne, so unless you are in an open indoor area like a gymnasium, outside is your best option.Some saberers have reported that the cork flies as far as twenty feet, so give yourself plenty of room.
Be sure that the guests you are trying to impress with this trick have a safe haven away from flying corks.
Prepare the bottle. Wipe away any moisture on the bottle. Remove the foil and wire basket from the top of the bottle. Keep your thumb over the cork as you do this. There is a chance that simply removing the wire will cause the cork to fly out. [Edit]Holding the Bottle
Locate one of the seams on the bottle. This is where the two halves of the bottle join together. It’s the weakest part of the bottle, so it’s where you’re going to focus your attention.
Hold the bottle at a 30 degree angle with the seam facing upward. The cork should be higher than the bottom of the bottle. Be sure to point the cork in a direction where it will not hit anyone or anything. The angle doesn’t have to be very precise.
Hold the bottle with your non-dominant hand. Grip the bottle firmly at the base. Put all of your fingers except your thumb beneath the bottle (on the opposite side from the seam) out of the way of the sword. The bottle should rest on your fingers while your thumb stabilizes it. [4]Your sword will not come anywhere near the base, so your fingers will be safe down here.
Put your thumb in the indentation at the bottom of the bottle. This will help you stabilize the bottle without putting your thumb in danger.Once your thumb is in place, practice holding your fingers closer together or farther apart.
Choose the method of holding the bottle that feels both secure and safe. [5][Edit]Sabering the Bottle
Rest the blade of the sword on the neck of the bottle. The dull edge of the blade should face the cork. Hold the blade flat against the bottle.This trick also works if you use the sharp or cutting edge of the sword, but it can damage your sword.
Using the cutting edge of a sword can also increase the chances that you don’t get a clean cut.
Locate the annulus of the bottle. This is the ring around the top, which you will be aiming for with the back of the sword.Notice the point of the annulus where it connects with the seam of the bottle. This is the weakest point on the bottle.
Practice sliding from the base of the bottle to the annulus. Before attempting this grand gesture, it will help for you to get a feel for the motion.[6]You could also try putting the sword down and practicing the motion with just your hand.
Slide the knife down the vertical seam and hit the annulus. Do this using a single firm, confident stroke.[7] The bottle should break cleanly and the cork should go flying. If done correctly, the bottle will break cleanly. Make sure you follow through with the motion — that is, don’t halt your arm when you hit the annulus. Continue moving your arm forward, following the trajectory of the cork.You will get the best, cleanest results by following the seam.[8]
If you don’t use enough force or you pause, the trick won’t work.
If you find that your first attempt doesn’t work, you should go back to practicing. Be sure that you can move your hand (without the sword) quickly and assuredly.
Inspect the neck of the glass for shards. Wipe it off carefully with a cloth if necessary. Be careful not to push shards of glass into the bottle.The pressure inside that sent the cork and top of the bottle flying will likely have prevented any shards from falling into the bottle, but you can never be too careful. [9]
Pour and enjoy! Be sure to double check the glass of champagne for shards of glass.It’s also a good idea to locate the annulus and cork at this point. Be careful not to step on it, and only pick it up by the edge that isn’t broken.
[Edit]Video
.

[Edit]Warnings
Screw-top sparkling wine (like Andre brand) will not work.
If you’d love to include Champagne sabering in your next event but you’re too afraid to give it a go, there are official Champagne sabering experts who can be hired for your event. Look for a person who is officially trained by the “La Confrerie du Sabre d’Or”. This person may even be able to show you how to do it.
If your first try doesn’t work, be aware that the agitation of the first swipe will cause the wine to “spew” more when you are successful. Multiple attempts to behead a bottle will contribute to a messy break (and an undrinkable bottle).
Non-carbonated wine will not work. The pressure inside the bottle is part of what makes this work.
The “beheaded” portion of the bottle has a very sharp glass edge. Be very careful picking it up.
Throw away any incorrectly beheaded bottles. Do not drink from any bottles that break messily. A correctly beheaded bottle has a single, clean break (which is still sharp, but not shattered).[Edit]Things You’ll Need
A well-chilled bottle of champagne or sparkling wine sealed with a cork
A large knife or sword that has a squared back edge
Ample space to send the cork and bottleneck flying (about 20 feet)[Edit]Related wikiHows
Buy Wine for a Crowd
Chill Champagne
Throw a Cocktail Party
Host a Wine Tasting Party
Open a Wine Bottle Without a Corkscrew
Make Cheap Wine[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/how-to-saber-a-champagne-bottle-with-writer-neal-stephenson

↑ http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2013/02/23/172723002/a-dramatic-way-to-uncork-the-bubbly-use-a-sword

↑ http://www.bonappetit.com/entertaining-style/article/champagne-sabering-video

↑ https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/how-to-saber-a-champagne-bottle-with-writer-neal-stephenson

↑ http://www.henrisreserve.com/?method=pages.showPage&PageID=86A80775-B29B-F1C3-2CBE-5D45E5BBBB19&originalMarketingURL=education/champagne-guide-301

↑ http://www.champagnesabering.com/index.php?id=9

↑ ttp://www.champagneandgifts.co.uk/champagne-sabre

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