How to Find Out if Your Ex Still Likes You

Crushing on your ex can be a painful experience, and you probably want to know if there’s a chance you’ll get back together. To figure out if your ex still likes you, watch their behavior to see how they’re acting toward you. Additionally, notice how often they communicate with you and the types of communication you have. As another option, talk to your family and friends to find out if they think your ex is still interested.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Watching Their Behavior
Notice if your ex always seems to be around. Your ex will probably try to find reasons to be around you if they’re still interested. They might pop up at your job, hang out at your favorite places, and attend events they know you enjoy. Track how often you see your ex to figure out if they might be trying to run into you.[1]
If you and your ex both like the same local coffee shop, they might not be there to see you. However, if your ex never had an interest in art before your breakup but shows up at every art opening, they’re probably coming in the hopes of running into you.
Look at what they’re posting on social media. If you’re still following them on social media, scroll through their recent postings to see what’s going on in their life. Notice if they seem happy or sad. Additionally, see if they appear to have moved on or might be stuck in the past.[2]
For instance, a post like, “Really miss the good times I used to have with a certain someone” or “The last few days have been hard” might mean they’re thinking about you. On the other hand, if they’re posting pics of them with a new partner, they might be moving on.
Check if they’re liking your social media posts and pics. It’s normal for your ex to occasionally react to 1 of your posts. However, your ex might still be interested if they’re liking most of your posts or going back to like old posts. Track how often they interact with your social media account to see if they might still care about you.[3]
For instance, it might not mean anything if your ex likes a post about you getting a new car. However, they probably still like you if they like every photo you post of yourself.
If your ex likes old photos of you together, it’s very likely that they still like you.
Watch how your ex reacts when they see you. When you run into your ex, watch their reaction to see if it’s positive, neutral, or negative. Look at their facial expressions and their body language to help you figure out how they feel.[4]
For instance, let’s say your ex smiles really big and comes over to say, “Hi! How’s it going?” This might be a sign they still like you.
If they give you a slight wave and say, “Oh, hey,” they might feel neutral toward you. In this case, they might just want to be friends.
On the other hand, they might have moved on if they frown, move away, or fold their arms in front of their body.
Notice if your ex touches you a lot. When you like someone, it’s really hard to resist casually touching them. In fact, this is a common way to flirt! Consider if your ex touches you on your arm, shoulder, back, or legs. This could be a sign that they like you.[5]
You might also notice that your ex goes in for a hug whenever you run into each other or after you have a conversation. This might mean they like you.
See if they’re willing to do you a favor. Your ex might be willing to help you out with something if they’re still into you. Tell them about a problem that you’re having and see if they volunteer to help. Alternatively, ask them to help you with something you know they’re good at doing. If they say yes, they might still like you.[6]
For example, ask them to help you with a homework assignment or ask them to help you host a party for a mutual friend.
If your ex is super friendly and helpful, they might do you the favor even if they don’t like you.
Pay attention if they’re hanging onto some of your things. Normally, you give each other back your personal belongings after a break up. If your ex keeps some of your stuff, it might be a sign they still like you. Check to see if you got all of your things back from them.[7]
For instance, your ex might keep 1 of your shirts so they can smell your scent. Similarly, they might keep an old DVD of a movie you watched together a lot.
If the item is valuable, your ex might just be trying to keep it for its value. As an example, don’t let them keep your mp3 player.
Find out if they’ve gone on any dates or hooked up with someone. Check your ex’s social media accounts to see if they’re posting about a new relationship or if they’ve posted photos with a new partner. Additionally, check with your mutual friends to find out if there’s someone new in their life. If they’re dating someone else, they’re probably focused on the future and their new relationship.[8]
In some cases, your ex might post photos of themself with someone else to make you jealous. However, they’ve likely moved on if they’re in another relationship.[Edit]Examining Your Communications
Track how often your ex reaches out to talk or text. Your ex will probably find reasons to contact you if they’re still interested. Check how often they call, text, or talk to you in person. Similarly, consider if they start the conversation back up after it has ended. This might be a sign they like you.[9]
For example, your ex might text you to ask questions they probably know the answer to. They might ask, “Do we have an assignment due tomorrow?” “Do you know if Candy’s party is still on Saturday?” or “I hope it’s okay that we’re both going to mini golf tomorrow.”
Notice if your ex brings up nostalgic moments in your relationship. If they start telling happy stories about your relationship, it means they’re thinking about good times. This is a sign that they might still like you. Listen when your ex starts talking about old times to see if they’re focusing on the good parts of your relationship.[10]
They might say, “Remember that time we had a candlelight picnic under the stars. That was such a good night,” or “I still remember how much we laughed at the improv theater. We had such good times together.”
See if they check on you when you’re going through hard times. When you’re feeling upset, it’s natural for a person who cares about you to make sure you’re okay. Notice if your ex always seems to be there for you when you need someone. Additionally, consider if they’re willing to listen to you talk about your problems.[11]
As an example, let’s say you post on social media that your relative is in the hospital. Your ex might immediately text, “Are you okay?”
Keep in mind that this might not mean they like you in a romantic way. They might check up on you because they still care about you as a friend.
Notice if they come to you for advice. Typically, you go to someone you trust when you need advice. Consider how often your ex relies on you for advice about their problems. If your ex consistently comes to you, this means they probably still feel close to you. It might even mean they still like you.[12]
For example, they might tell you about problems they’re having at work or school. Then, they might ask what you think they should do.
Pay attention if they start talking about their past mistakes. Bringing up their mistakes means that they’re thinking about what they could have done differently. This may mean they’re trying to figure out how to fix your relationship. Listen closely if they start talking about what they did wrong, what they could’ve done differently, or how they’ve changed.[13]
They might say, “I realize now that I should’ve listened more,” “I really regret talking to that other girl. I’ll never make that mistake again,” or “Since we broke up, I’ve really changed. You made me a better person.”[Edit]Asking Your Support System
Ask your friends if they think your ex is still into you. Your friends have a different perspective on your relationship with your ex. They’re likely able to see things that you don’t notice. Talk to them to find out how they think your ex feels. Get several opinions to help you figure out if your ex might still like you.[14]
You might ask, “What did you think about my relationship with my ex?” “Do you think we might get back together?” “Do you think they’ve moved on?” and “Could they still like me?”
Find out if your ex still talks to your family. While there are several reasons your ex might stay connected with your family, this can be a sign that they haven’t totally moved on. Ask your family members if they’re still in communication with your ex. If they are, ask them if your ex still talks about you, which is a sign they still like you.[15]
It’s normal for your ex to stay close with your family if you share kids together. They may be talking to your family because it’s important for the kids.
If your ex had a friendship with a family member prior to your relationship, they’ll probably stay friends with that person after the breakup. Don’t count these types of relationships when trying to figure out if they still like you.
Talk to mutual friends to find out how often your ex talks about you. If your ex still likes you, they’re probably looking for reasons to talk about you. This means their friends will probably have heard them talking about you. Check with the mutual friends you share with them to find out what your ex is saying.[16]
Ask, “Does Alex still talk about me?”
If you don’t have any mutual friends, you might try reaching out to their friend group. If you’re nervous, get one of your friends to ask one of your ex’s friends.[Edit]Signs Your Ex Still Likes You and Help Talking About Getting Back Together
WH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e0ab9b23fdb1’)Signs Your Ex Still Likes YouWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e0ab9b2405fd’)Talking to Your Ex about Getting Back Together
[Edit]Tips
Be really careful if you have children with your ex. Children sometimes hope that their parents will get back together, and the last thing that you want to do is to get their hopes up and disappoint them again. Be very discreet until you know you’re back together for sure.[Edit]Warnings
Avoid having post-breakup make-out sessions or sex with your ex unless you’re sure that both of you want to get back together. Don’t let your ex take advantage of your heartbreak and just use you for the physical connection.
Don’t be too quick to jump back into the relationship. Sometimes, you idealize the things you no longer have. Don’t forget why you broke up. If you’re only going to jump back into the same problems, then steer clear of your ex.[Edit]Related wikiHows
React If Your Ex Boyfriend Asks You Out Again
Get Your Ex Back
Stop Loving Someone
Get Your Ex Girlfriend Back
Get Your Ex to Like You
Tell Your Ex You Still Have Feelings for Him
Like Your Current Boyfriend when You Still Love Your Ex[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/news/a33876/signs-hes-still-obsessed-with-his-ex/

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/signs-your-ex-still-loves-you-and-wants-you-back/

↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/news/a33876/signs-hes-still-obsessed-with-his-ex/

↑ https://www.anewmode.com/dating-relationships/does-my-ex-boyfriend-still-like-me-how-to-know/4/

↑ https://www.anewmode.com/dating-relationships/does-my-ex-boyfriend-still-like-me-how-to-know/4/

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/signs-your-ex-still-loves-you-and-wants-you-back/

↑ https://www.anewmode.com/dating-relationships/does-my-ex-boyfriend-still-like-me-how-to-know/

↑ https://www.anewmode.com/dating-relationships/does-my-ex-boyfriend-still-like-me-how-to-know/

↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/news/a33876/signs-hes-still-obsessed-with-his-ex/

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/signs-your-ex-still-loves-you-and-wants-you-back/

↑ https://www.anewmode.com/dating-relationships/does-my-ex-boyfriend-still-like-me-how-to-know/4/

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/signs-your-ex-still-loves-you-and-wants-you-back/

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/signs-your-ex-still-loves-you-and-wants-you-back/

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/signs-your-ex-still-loves-you-and-wants-you-back/

↑ https://inspiringtips.com/signs-your-ex-still-loves-you-and-wants-you-back/

↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/news/a33876/signs-hes-still-obsessed-with-his-ex/

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Today in History for 30th December 2019

Historical Events

1813 – Danzig surrenders to allied armies
1905 – Former Governor Frank Steunenberg is assassinated near his home in Caldwell, Idaho
1933 – Government disallows NSB-membership for civil service
1963 – Congress authorizes Kennedy half dollar
1975 – “Boccaccio” closes at Edison Theater NYC after 7 performances
1979 – Togo adopts constitution

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1644 – Philips van Almonde, Dutch Zeeuws lt-admiral
1917 – Seymour Melman, American industrial engineer (d. 2004)
1931 – Richard Christ, writer
1945 – Preston Andrew Trombly, composer
1985 – Lars Boom, Dutch cyclist
1992 – Carson Wentz, American NFL quarterback (Philadelphia Eagles), born in Raleigh, North Carolina

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

274 – St Felix I, dies and ends his reign as Catholic Pope
1662 – Ferdinand Charles, Archduke of Austria and Regent of the Tyrol, dies at 34
1865 – Henry Winter Davis, American politician and unionist, dies at 48
1995 – Doris Grau, American script supervisor, actress and voice artist (Point Blank, King Kong), dies from respiratory failure at 71
2003 – John Gregory Dunne, American writer, dies of heart attack at 71
2010 – Bobby Farrell, Aruban singer (Boney M) (b. 1949)

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How to Shelve Books in a Library

If you are thinking of volunteering or getting a job at a library, you likely will be shelving books. Books have to be ordered on shelves for library patrons to find and check out. To make sorting easier, libraries arrange books according to classification systems. Most public and school libraries use the Dewey Decimal System, while many universities and specialty libraries use the Library of Congress Classification system. Find out which system your library uses, then take advantage of the call number tags taped to books to ensure each one has a place on the shelves.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Ordering Books Neatly
Read the call number on the book to figure out where it belongs. Look at the book’s spine for an identification tag. The call number will correspond to the Dewey Decimal System, Library of Congress classification system, or another alternative depending on which one your library uses. Read the letter or number listing on the tag to identify the book’s subject matter and find out where it belongs.[1]
Note that the sorting rules will vary depending on what system your library uses. Each library can do things in a slightly different way, so get accustomed to the sorting style before attempting to shelve anything.
If the book doesn’t have a call number, ask a librarian where it belongs. Let them look up the correct call number and tag the book to make the identification process easier for both guests and shelvers alike!
Keep in mind that children’s books follow the same rules as adult books. Separate the books by type, such as fiction, non-fiction, and picture book. Then, use the call number if they are available or alphabetical order by author if they are not.
Take the book to the correct section according to the call number. The call number will be an actual number if you’re going by the Dewey Decimal Classification system (DDC) or a letter if you’re using the Library of Congress (LCC) classification. Books are sorted by subject matter through these systems. Find the shelf corresponding to the subject matter indicated by the tag.[2]
For example, a DCC call number of 780 is used to mark a book on music. For the LCC system, the call number is M. Take the book to the music section or look for other books with similar call numbers.
Libraries often separate books by section, such as fiction, non-fiction, sci-fi, fantasy, and young adult. Familiarize yourself with the library’s layout to make shelving easier. That way, you don’t accidentally stick a children’s book on the adult section!
Sort fiction books alphabetically according to their author. Use the author’s last name, followed by their first and middle names, to position books from left to right on a shelf. If you don’t see an author listed, sort by the name of the publisher instead. Fiction books take up a large part of most libraries, so they often aren’t listed with call numbers. You will have to reason your way through the alphabet to shelve them correctly![3]
For instance, the author of the Harry Potter series is J. K. Rowling. Bring the books to the R shelf in the fiction section.
Collections of poems and short stories from modern and popular authors often get grouped into the fiction section. This can vary from library to library, but most shelvers do it this way so patrons don’t have to look in multiple places to find popular books.
Arrange fiction books by series when they share the same author. For books that have the same author, sort them left to right alphabetically according to the series name. Then, sort the books in the series by number order. Standalone books come after series books and are also sorted alphabetically by title.[4]
For instance, you would put the Harry Potter books from the first to the last. The release dates listed on each book’s spine can help with this.
Ignore articles like “a,” “and,” and “the” when they start titles. Include prepositions like “of” and “into.” If you’re looking at books by Michael Crichton, The Andromeda Strain would come first since it starts with an A.
Organize nonfiction books according to their call numbers. The most important part of shelving these books is getting them to the right section. Take the book to the proper shelf and then refer to the book’s call number tag. Fit the book by number first and then alphabetically by author if books share the same number.[5]
In the DDC system, you may have a couple of medical books labeled as 613. A possible order would be 616.3 ASL, 616.3 ART, and 616.3 BAI.
For the LCC system, sort by the starting letters in the call number, then arrange by number. For instance, PR 8914 J46 comes before PR 8914 J6.
Note that plays and poetry are often placed in the literature section of the sorting system unless they are from modern authors, but this varies a lot between libraries.
Arrange biographies according to the people they are about. Biographies and memoirs are unique because they are typically sorted by subject matter instead of author. Doing it this way helps patrons find topics with ease. The subject and the author are part of the call number. Sort the books alphabetically by the person’s name first and then the author’s name second.[6]
For example, you might have a range of books on the Kennedys. Sort them by name, such as Edward, Jack, Jacqueline, John, and Rose.
If you’re unsure where a book goes, check the call number. No matter what classification system your library uses, you can compare call numbers to figure out where a book fits on the shelf.
Glance at the shelves for books placed in the wrong spot. Before putting a book back where it belongs, look along the shelf for anything that has been put into the wrong place. On average, try to look about 4 spots to the left and right of where you plan on placing a book. Use the call number tags as a reference. If a book appears to be in the wrong spot, pull it off the shelf.[7]
If you don’t pay attention to the call numbers, you could end up putting a book in the wrong place. You might spot a similar call number and place a book next to it only to realize that both of them belong elsewhere.
If you spot any loose books scattered around, take them with you to shelve them later. Books that are only slightly out of place can be shelved right away. For books that are far from where they belong, take them to the circulation desk to ensure they haven’t been reported as missing.
Neaten the shelves to keep them accessible to patrons. It wouldn’t be right if the books didn’t look inviting to potential readers! Position the books so the spines face outward and are flush with the front edge of the shelf. Also, leave a little bit of space on the shelves so the books stay standing but are still easy to remove. You can test this by attempting to pull books out after shelving them.[8]
If you pack the books too tightly, you won’t be able to pull them out easily and may end up losing some through the back end of the shelf. However, if you pack them too loosely, they may fall over and leave a bigger mess.
If you don’t have enough space for books on a shelf, then plan on moving some to a different shelf. Check with any available librarians to make sure this is okay.[Edit]Using the Dewey Decimal System to Shelve Books
Check the first digit of the call number to determine the book’s subject. The Dewey Decimal System is a handy classification method used by most public libraries. Essentially, every subject is assigned a category number you can use to group individual books. Librarians place a tag on the book’s spine that displays its unique call number. The system consists of 10 classes:[9]
000 corresponds with books on computer science, information, and general works.
100 stands for philosophy and psychology.
200 represents books on religion.
300 is for social sciences
400 is reserved for books on language.
500 corresponds to pure science.
600 stands for technology and applied science.
700 represents arts and recreation.
800 means literature.
900 relates to history and geography.
Use the second digit to more specifically classify the book’s subject. The remaining digits in the call number are for subdivisions used in the classification system. Always read them after noting the broader category the book belongs to. The second digit breaks books down into slightly more specific categories. There are over 100 subcategories, so look for them at https://www.oclc.org/content/dam/oclc/dewey/resources/summaries/deweysummaries.pdf.
For example, books on astronomy have a call number of 520. The 5 classifies it as a science book, while the 2 corresponds to astronomy.
Another example is an English language book with a call number of 420. The 4 places it in the language section while the 2 identifies it as a book about English.
Look at the third digit for an additional subdivision. The third digit is an extra classification explaining the book’s subject matter. It is meant to be used after classifying the book through the previous digits. When you take the book to the proper shelf, you can then group it with other books that have the same starting call number. Read about the 1,000 subdivisions at https://www.oclc.org/content/dam/oclc/dewey/resources/summaries/deweysummaries.pdf.[10]
For instance, you may see an astronomy book labeled 523. The 3 means the book is about planets and other objects in space. In comparison, a book about Earth will be listed as 525.
Another example is an American literature book. Its call number starts with an 8 for American literature, followed by a 1 for some category of literature. An 811 means poetry, an 812 means drama, and so on.
Read the decimal number to organize books with the same call number. The decimal number is called the book’s cutter number. It is used to sort books up into even smaller categories, but you won’t be able to figure this out unless you’re looking at the library’s organizing system on a computer. However, it can still help you shelve books in numerical order. The author’s name will be listed at the end of the cutter number as well.[11]
For example, a cutter number of 595.789 corresponds to a book about butterflies. The call number directs you to the natural science section. The cutter number then gives you a more precise idea of what the book is about.
For an American literature book, a call number of 813.4 represents an American literature book written between 1861 and 1900. The 813 tells you the book is about American fiction, while the .4 narrows it down to a certain time period.
More digits in the call number mean a more specific subject. Think of each digit as a separate subdivision.[Edit]Shelving with the Library of Congress System
Read the first letter in the call number to determine the book’s subject matter. The Library of Congress classification system (LCC) breaks books down into 20 separate areas of knowledge. Each one corresponds to a certain letter of the alphabet. This letter will always be the first thing you see listed on the call number tag on a book’s spine.[12]
A is for general works, which includes encyclopedias, newspapers, and other collections.
B represents philosophy, religion, and psychology.
C denotes auxiliary history, including biographies, genealogy, and archaeology.
D represents world history.
E is specifically reserved for American history.
F is also used for American history, but it covers local U.S. history and Latin America.
G is for books on geography and anthropology.
H contains books on social sciences like economics and sociology.
J lists books on political science.
K contains any books on law.
M is for all music books.
N categorizes books on fine art, like architecture and painting.
P includes books on language and linguistics.
Q has general science and math books.
R is reserved for medicine and medical books.
S is saved for books on agriculture.
T represents books on technology.
U is all about military science.
V covers naval science.
Z contains bibliographies and library science books.
Check the second letter to determine the book’s subcategory. Each knowledge category is broken down into smaller subdivisions you can use when shelving. After taking the book to the proper section, read the second letter to arrange it according to its subject matter. It belongs with books that have the same letters in their call numbers. For a list of subdivisions, go to https://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/lcco/.[13]
For example, The Catcher In The Rye by J. D. Salinger has a call number of PS3537. The P stands for language, but the S narrows it down to American literature.
Sort the books from left to right according to the call number. The rest of the call number tag contains a string of digits. It isn’t as confusing as it first seems and makes sorting books very easy. Read the whole number, then arrange the books in order. Find similar call numbers to find out where a book fits on a shelf.[14]
For example, “PS3537 A426 C3 1951” is the full call number for The Catcher In The Rye. It comes between PS3536 and PS3538 on a shelf.
Place earlier editions before older editions of the same book. The year at the end of the call number indicates when the book was published. Always arrange the editions from left to right. Most libraries don’t carry multiple editions, but it’s a possibility with older books that were popular enough to be printed several times.[15]
For instance, you may have a 1951 and 1991 edition of The Catcher In The Rye. Place the 1951 edition before the 1991 one.
Multiple editions of the same book have the same call number. Only the year differs, so look for it at the end of the call number.[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
Call numbers are always read from left to right and top to bottom. No matter what system you use, the call numbers are simple and straightforward.
All library books, no matter what organization system they are classified under, are meant to be shelved from left to right and top to bottom.
Note that all libraries have different rules. Even if libraries use the same classification system, they may have slightly different shelving guidelines that differ from what you are used to.
To shelve books faster, organize them in a cart by genre. Arrange them by call number so you can scan across the correct shelf and place them where they belong.
If you have a question or run into a problem while shelving books, speak with a librarian for assistance. One of their responsibilities is to ensure all books are labeled and placed neatly on shelves.[Edit]Warnings
Book classification systems are complex, so attempting to memorize them can be a frustrating experience. Instead of memorizing it all, learn the main classifications and subdivisions, then use the library’s computer system if you need more help pinpointing specific books.[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul/staff/access_serv/coll_mgt/overview_of_shelving.pdf

↑ https://guides.uflib.ufl.edu/c.php?g=421452&p=2905038

↑ https://www.cincinnatilibrary.org/info/shelvingtest.html

↑ https://www.cincinnatilibrary.org/info/shelvingtest.html

↑ https://www.carli.illinois.edu/sites/files/pub_serv/110406HowToShelveBooks.pdf

↑ https://multcolib.org/sites/default/files/BasicShelvingRules.pdf

↑ https://guides.fscj.edu/training/shelving

↑ https://osu.libguides.com/c.php?g=439335&p=3586591

↑ https://piercecountylibrary.silkroad.com/map_images/main/SiteGen/PCLSEXT/Content/Uploads/Unplaced_Documents/Book_Shelving_9.8.11.pdf

↑ https://piercecountylibrary.silkroad.com/map_images/main/SiteGen/PCLSEXT/Content/Uploads/Unplaced_Documents/Book_Shelving_9.8.11.pdf

↑ https://multcolib.org/sites/default/files/BasicShelvingRules.pdf

↑ https://www.libraries.rutgers.edu/rul/staff/access_serv/coll_mgt/overview_of_shelving.pdf

↑ https://www.loc.gov/catdir/cpso/lcco/

↑ https://www.library.kent.edu/library-congress-tutorial-call-number-and-shelving

↑ https://guides.lib.umich.edu/c.php?g=282937

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