How to Make a Paper Straw

Paper straws come in all sorts of colors and are a great way to add a unique touch to any event. They can get expensive, however, and sometimes you just can’t find the exact color or pattern that you need. Fortunately, it’s possible to make paper straws at home. All you need to get started are dowels, scrapbooking paper, some glue, and paraffin wax.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Cutting and Rolling the Straws
Cut patterned scrapbooking paper into wide strips. Find some scrapbooking paper in a pattern that you like, then use a paper slicer or paper guillotine to cut it into wide strips. How many strips you cut is up to you. Each strip will make 1 straw.[1]Don’t use scrapbooking cardstock; it’s too stiff and heavy to hold curls, which is vital to making straws.[2] You can also use printer paper for plain white straws.
Look for standard, patterned scrapbooking paper. It’s a medium-weight, paper.[3]
Apply glue to the back of a strip, from a long edge. Flip a strip over so that the back is visible. Next, draw a line of liquid glue along 1 of the long edges. Rather than having the glue touch the edge, however, apply it from the edge. The glue should still touch the narrow edges of the strip, however.[4]In most cases, the back of the paper will be white. If you’re using double-sided paper, work on the side that you don’t want to be visible.
Any type of liquid glue will work as long as it says “non-toxic” on the bottle. Make sure that you make the line as thin as possible.
Set a thick dowel at a 45-degree angle at 1 end of the strip. One end of the dowel should be sticking out just part the corner that has the glue on it. The rest of the dowel should be facing the un-glued edge of the paper.[5]
Choose a dowel that is about long. This will be much easier to work with than a long dowel.
If you can’t find a dowel that short, cut a longer one down with a hand saw or heavy-duty gardening shears.
Roll the paper around the dowel, overlapping it with each wrap. Make sure that you overlap the paper enough so that the glued edge touches paper—not wood. A little over would be good. This is sort of like making a candy cane, except that you aren’t leaving any gaps between the “stripes.”[6]Keep the paper snug so that it holds its shape, but don’t roll it too tightly, or it will be difficult to remove.
If the end of the paper doesn’t stay down, secure it with a drop of glue.
Slide the paper off the dowel and allow it to dry overnight. The paper should stick together on its own, even after you slide it off the dowel. If you’re worried about it coming unrolled, however, wrap painter’s tape around each end before you pull the paper off.[7]Painter’s tape is a great choice because it’s easy to remove and doesn’t leave residue.
Once you have removed the first straw, you can use the dowel to create more.
Trim the ends of the straws to make them flat. Because of how you rolled the paper, the ends of the straws will be pointy. This won’t be very comfortable or convenient when it comes to drinking from the straws, so use a pair of scissors to snip the points off.[8]If you made more than 1 straw, measure the straws against each other to ensure that they’re all the same length.
How short you cut your straw is up to you. Make sure that both ends are flat and not angled, however.
The ends of the straw may get dented as you cut them. Use a chopstick, knitting needle, or other tapered tool to push them back into shape.[9][Edit]Coating the Straws
Break some canning paraffin wax into a jar. Find a large glass jar that’s deep enough to fit your straw all the way in. Break some paraffin wax into smaller pieces, then add them to the jar. Use enough wax to fill the jar 1/2 to 2/3 of the way; how much you end up using will depend on the size of the jar.[10]Don’t use candle-making wax as it may not be food-safe. If you can’t find canning paraffin wax, use beeswax. Be aware that it will have a slight fragrance.
Do not use soy wax. It melts at low temperatures and will give your straws a sticky, greasy feel.
Melt the wax in a pot of hot water over low to medium-low heat. Place the jar into a pot, then fill the pot with a few inches/centimeters of water. Turn the stove on to low or medium-low heat, and wait for the wax to melt. This can take 10 to 15 minutes, so be patient.[11]As the wax melts, you may need to add more pieces of paraffin wax; it needs to be deep enough to fit your straw 1/2 or 2/3 of the way in.
Paraffin wax is flammable, so don’t be tempted to speed the process up by turning the heat up. Slow, low, and steady is the key.[12]
How much water you use will vary. The top of the water needs to be level with the top of the wax in the jar.
Dip the straw into the wax then pull it out. Don’t leave the straw in the wax for too long. Just dip it in and pull it out. If you leave it too long in the wax, the glue may dissolve and the straw may come apart.[13]You won’t be able to dip the straw all the way in, which is fine. As long as you can get it 1/2 to 2/3 of the way into the wax, you’re good.
Let the wax drip back into the jar then wipe the rest off with a towel. Hold the straw over the jar of melted wax until it stops dripping. Next, run a paper towel across the waxed portion of the straw to remove the excess wax.[14]Don’t remove all of the wax—just the excess. A light sweep of your paper towel should be plenty.[15]
If the end of the straw is clogged with wax, stick a chopstick into it, twist it 2 to 3 times, then pull it out.[16]
The wax shouldn’t stick to the paper towel. If it does, use a paper towel with a smoother texture. Don’t use tissues or toilet paper; they’re too soft and will stick.
Dip the other side of the straw into the wax, then wipe that off too. Rotate the straw by 180 degrees, then dip the other end into the wax. Pull it out immediately, then let the wax drip back into the jar. Use a paper towel to wipe the excess wax off.[17]The wax should already be hard by the time you rotate it and dip it. If it’s still wet, however, let it dry first; otherwise, you’ll get fingerprints.
Dip the straw a little more than 1/2 or 2/3 of the way so that the wax overlaps onto the already-waxed portion. This way, you won’t have any gaps.[18]
Let the straw finish drying on a plastic bag. The wax layer is very thin, so it should harden almost instantly. The inside of the straw may still be wet however, so set the straw down on a plastic bag and let it dry for a few minutes. Once the straw is dry, it’s ready to use.[19]
The straw may look translucent once it’s dry, which is normal. This is due to the nature of the paraffin wax.
If you have other straws to dip, now is the time to do so.[Edit]Tips
If you don’t have access to a stove, heat the wax in a jar on a candle warmer or mug warmer.[20]
If you can’t find paper that you like, print out your own designs. Since you’ll be coating the paper with wax anyway, you don’t have to worry about the ink bleeding.[21]
If the hot water is generating too much steam, turn the stove off. The wax will remain in a liquid state long enough for you to be able to dip at least a couple of straws.[22]
Don’t pour the leftover wax down the drain. Let it harden, then discard it in the trash. Alternatively, use it to make candles.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Scrapbooking paper
A paper trimmer or paper guillotine
Non-toxic liquid glue
Scissors
wide wood dowel
Paraffin wax
Glass jar
Pot
Paper towels
[Edit]Related wikiHows
Make a Paper Napkin Flower With a Plastic Straw
Make a Paper Rocket[Edit]References↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.lookatwhatimade.net/crafts/paper/make-your-own-paper-drinking-straws/

↑ https://www.scrapbook.com/articles/everything-you-need-to-know-about-paper

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.lookatwhatimade.net/crafts/paper/make-your-own-paper-drinking-straws/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.lookatwhatimade.net/crafts/paper/make-your-own-paper-drinking-straws/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.lookatwhatimade.net/crafts/paper/make-your-own-paper-drinking-straws/

↑ http://www.lookatwhatimade.net/crafts/paper/make-your-own-paper-drinking-straws/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.lookatwhatimade.net/crafts/paper/make-your-own-paper-drinking-straws/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.natashalh.com/how-to-make-your-own-custom-paper-straws-great-for-diy-weddings-and-holidays/

↑ http://www.lookatwhatimade.net/crafts/paper/make-your-own-paper-drinking-straws/

↑ http://www.lookatwhatimade.net/crafts/paper/make-your-own-paper-drinking-straws/

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Today in History for 31st January 2020

Historical Events

1804 – British vice-admiral William Blighs fleet reaches Curacao
1955 – Australian Championships Women’s Tennis: Beryl Penrose wins her only Australian singles title; beats Thelma Coyne Long 6-4, 6-3
1970 – Grateful Dead members busted on LSD charges
1988 – Super Bowl XXII, Jack Murphy Stadium, San Diego, CA: Washington Redskins beat Denver Broncos, 42-10; MVP: Doug Williams, Washington, QB
2015 – Pr-Football Hall of Fame inductees: Junior Seau, Jerome Bettis, Charles Haley, Will Shields, Tim Brown, and Mick Tingelhoff
2019 – Blockbuster NBA trade: NY Knicks send Kristaps Porziņģis, Tim Hardaway Jr., Courtney Lee and Trey Burke to Dallas Mavericks for Dennis Smith Jr., DeAndre Jordan, Wesley Matthews and 2 future 1st-round picks

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1686 – Hans Egede, Norwegian Lutheran missionary (d. 1758)
1820 – William B. Washburn, 28th Governor of Massachusetts (d. 1887)
1909 – Foley Newns, British colonial administrator
1961 – Lloyd Cole, English rocker (Lloyd Cole and the Commotions), born in Buxton, Derbyshire
1971 – Lee Young Ae, South Korean actress, born in Seoul, South Korea
1973 – Portia de Rossi, Australian actress, born in Horsham, Australia

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1561 – Bairam Khan, Great Mughal General, regent for Akbar
1892 – Charles Spurgeon, English preacher and evangelist, dies at 57
1973 – Ragnar Frisch, Norwegian economist (Nobel 1969), dies at 77
1974 – Roger Pryor, American actor (Lady by Choice, Belle of the Nineties, Identity Unknown), dies at 72
1996 – Gustave Solomon, mathematician, dies at 65
2015 – Richard von Weizsacker, German politician and 1st president of reunited Germany (1990-94), dies at 94

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How to Have a Good Job Interview

Getting a job interview is an exciting and scary experience. You want to make a great impression on your interviewer and get the job, but you likely feel super nervous. To have a good interview, do your homework ahead of time by researching the employer, reviewing the job description, and planning how you’ll answer questions. Then, make a good impression by dressing professionally and arriving on time. When you’re talking to your interviewer, focus on how you fit the company and try to give memorable answers. Then, follow up with the interviewer to increase your chances of getting hired.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Doing Your Homework
Research the potential employer before the interview. Type the name of the company into your favorite internet search engine. Review their website, then check out their recent postings on social media. Next, look for news articles about the company. Learn as much as you can so you can show that knowledge in your interview.[1]
Pay attention to the company’s mission statement, their current goals or projects, and their future plans.
Look for materials that were provided to employees, shareholders, or potential investors.
Find the interviewer on LinkedIn so you can learn about them. Learning about your interview allows you to build a rapport with them. Additionally, you can tailor your answers to them, which might help you get the job. Check out your interviewer’s profile to find out where they went to school, where they’ve worked, and what jobs they’ve held. Try to find some commonalities with them.[2]
For example, if you both studied the same major in college, you might be able to bring that up in your interview.
If they don’t have a LinkedIn account, see if you can find them on other social media sites. However, don’t stalk your interviewer and be careful with information that isn’t related to work. Your interviewer won’t be impressed by your knowledge about their family life.
Review the job description so you can explain why you’re a good fit. Your interview is your chance to show why you’re a good fit for the job, and the job description tells you exactly how to do that. Read over the job description to identify the skills and abilities the company wants in a successful candidate. Then, connect your work and education history to what they’re looking for.[3]
For instance, let’s say the job description includes “self-starter,” “able to create innovative solutions,” and “team mindset.” You might identify instances where you’ve worked alone and met deadlines, examples of creative solutions you’ve implemented, and stories about your successes on team projects.
Practice answering common questions before your interview. While some employers throw in random questions, there are several popular interview questions that appear in most job interviews. Review these questions and develop a good answer based on your work and education history. Then, practice delivering your answers. Here are some common questions:[4]
What are your strengths?
What are your weaknesses?
Why do you want to work for this company?
Where do you see yourself in 5 years? What about 10 years?
Why are you leaving your current company?
What do you think you offer that no one else will?
When did you make a mistake in the past? What happened?
What is an accomplishment that makes you proud?
Do a mock interview with a friend or family member. Doing mock interviews helps you practice giving your answers to another person. Pick someone who is supportive of you but will give you honest feedback about how you can improve. Then, give them a list of common interview questions that they can ask. Treat the mock interview just like a regular interview.[5]
Ask the mock interviewer to bring you into the interview space and sit you down. Then, answer their questions just like you would in a normal interview.
If you can’t get someone to interview you, film yourself answering the questions aloud. Then, watch the video to see how you can improve.
Make a list of 5-10 potential questions you can ask. Asking questions in an interview shows that you’re interested in the job and took the time to prepare. Based on your research and the job description, identify 5-10 potential questions that you might ask at the interview. Write your questions down so that you’ll have a few options in mind when you go in for your interview.[6]
For instance, you could ask questions like, “Are there opportunities for growth here?” “How big is the team?” or “What resources are available for the project?”
Ask about the biggest projects you’ll be working on. This shows your employer that you’ve closely read the job description and are anticipating taking on the role.
It’s okay to ask questions that come to you during the interview. Your list of questions should be a fall-back.
Identify career or education-related stories you can tell in the interview. Telling a story can help you demonstrate that you have the skills for the job. Think about times that you accomplished something significant, created a solution, handled a difficult situation, overcame an obstacle, or demonstrated leadership skills. Then, practice explaining those experiences in a way that highlights your best qualities.[7]
For example, you might explain how you handled someone stealing credit for your work at a past job or how you got the best out of a team that wasn’t collaborating well.
Similarly, you might highlight your accomplishments by telling a story about how you attained your most lucrative client or how you solved a problem that could have been a major liability for your company.
Bring copies of your resume and portfolio if you have one. Your interviewer likely has a copy of your cover letter or resume, but having your own copies makes you look ultra-prepared. Take a folder containing several copies of your resume and cover letter to the interview, just in case. Additionally, bring a copy of your work portfolio if that’s common in your industry.[8]
For instance, you might bring a portfolio if you’re interviewing for a design job. However, you probably won’t need one if you’re interviewing to be a nurse or a barista.[Edit]Making a Good First Impression
Dress professionally to show you’re serious about getting the job. Choose an outfit that reflects the position you want to attain. Additionally, make sure your outfit is clean, wrinkle-free, and fits well. This will show the potential employer that you take your career seriously.[9]
Don’t wear a bunch of cologne or perfume to your interview. Some people are sensitive to smells, so the scent might detract from what you’re saying.
If you know the company culture includes more casual dress, it’s okay to choose an outfit that fits with the typical workplace attire.
Turn off your phone and other electronics before the interview. You probably have a lot of important concerns right now, but dealing with them in a job interview is a no-no. Put your phone and other electronics on silent or turn them completely off. If you feel your phone go off, ignore it until after the interview.[10]
If you’re in a unique situation where you can’t turn off your phone, discuss this with your interviewer ahead of time. For instance, if you were an on-call nurse who’s interviewing for a job as a college professor, you might need to take a call from the hospital. In this unique case, your interviewer might understand.
Arrive to your interview 10-15 minutes early. It’s really important that you be on time for the interview. Not only does it show you’re reliable, it also demonstrates that you can plan ahead for unfamiliar situations. Being late for any reason will make you look unorganized and unconcerned.[11]
Don’t arrive more than 15 minutes early because it may confuse or inconvenience your interviewer. If you arrive to the location really early, go for a short walk or review your interview materials while you wait outside.
Make eye contact when you meet your interviewer. Eye contact shows the interviewer that you’re really listening to them and helps create a connection. Additionally, it projects that you have good interpersonal skills. Maintain eye contact during your greeting and throughout the interview.[12]
If eye contact is hard for you, practice by making eye contact with yourself in a mirror or practice with a relative or friend.
Give a firm handshake so you seem confident. When you meet your interviewer, go in for a handshake. Give their hand a firm squeeze and pump your arm twice before pulling away. This shows them that you’re confident and have strong interpersonal skills.[13]
If your palm is sweaty, discreetly wipe your hand off on your clothes or a tissue before you go in for the handshake.[Edit]Talking to the Interviewer
Set a positive, enthusiastic tone throughout the interview. You’ll be a stronger candidate if you appear to have a good attitude and seem excited about the job. Focus your answers on your accomplishments and how you hope to succeed moving forward. When you talk about past obstacles, explain how they’ve helped you grow and what lessons you’ve learned.[14]
For instance, tell the interviewer that you’re excited to take on new job tasks. Say, “I’m really excited about the opportunities for growth here. This project sounds really exciting.”
When talking about a conflict with a past coworker, say, “Communication with my team leader at my prior job was difficult at first, but our relationship taught me new ways to communicate. Because we compromised, we were able to complete our project ahead of schedule.”
Explain why you’re a great fit for the position and the company. The interviewer wants to know how you’ll solve the company’s problems, so tell them why you’ll perform well in the position if you’re hired. Discuss how your skills fit the job description and what your first steps will be if you’re hired. Additionally, use stories about your past work to show how you’ll perform well at this company.[15]
Your answers to each question should focus on how your knowledge, skills, and background fit this position and this company.
As an example, let’s say they ask you, “Why do you want to work for this company?” You might say something like, “I love that this company is focused on innovation instead of maintaining the status quo. In my career, I’ve developed systems that explore new concepts, and I want to pursue that further.”
Tell a unique story about your career or education so you’re memorable. The company is likely interviewing a lot of candidates, so it’s easy to blend in with the other interviewees. To stand out, tell a story that makes you memorable. Make sure that one of the stories you pick from your work or education history sets you apart from the other candidates, then include that in your answers to the interview questions.[16]
For example, let’s say your interviewer has asked, “What is a time that you made a mistake in the past? What happened?” You might reply, “At my previous job, I saved an important client presentation to a USB drive that I accidentally broke on the way to the client meeting. I knew my company needed to impress the client, so I had to recreate the presentation from scratch. I made myself a couple of notecards and delivered the presentation from memory. To make up for the lack of visuals, I incorporated audience participation. The representatives had so much fun in the presentation that they invited me to lunch and signed a contract that same day.”
Put a positive spin on past career obstacles so you seem resilient. You’ve likely had some tough workdays and possibly a boss or coworker you hated. However, it’s never a good look to bring this up in an interview. Instead, talk about how you thrived when going through an obstacle and focus on the best qualities in your former coworkers.[17]
For instance, let’s say your boss yelled a lot and degraded you. Instead of talking about how bad of a boss they were, you might say, “We didn’t always see eye-to-eye, but my former boss and I talked every day.”
Avoid telling jokes because they might make you look less professional. Jokes are tricky because they might get misunderstood. The interviewer could be offended or might mistake your joke for a sign that you don’t care about your work. Play it safe and don’t make jokes.[18]
It’s okay if you tell a story that’s slightly humorous. However, don’t try to make something funny if it’s not.
Never tell jokes about your profession or the interviewer’s job. They might not appreciate your sense of humor.
Be honest about your weaknesses but explain how you’ll improve. You might feel embarrassed about your weaknesses, and that’s totally normal. However, lying or trying to pretend your weaknesses are really strengths won’t do you any favors. Instead, explain what your biggest weakness has been in the past. Then, discuss what you’re doing to improve on it.[19]
As an example, don’t try to turn your weakness into a strength by saying, “My biggest weakness is that I’m too dedicated to my job.” The interviewer will only think that you’re not being honest about your actual weaknesses.
You might say, “I sometimes get flustered when I’m speaking to large groups. While people don’t seem to notice, I think my job performance will be better if I improve my public speaking skills. I’ve recently joined Toastmasters and I’m already feeling more confident.”
Ask your interviewer questions about the job. Your interviewer will give you a chance to ask questions about the job, which typically occurs at the end of the interview. Ask 3-5 questions based on what you discussed or from your list of prepared questions. This shows that you’re interested in the job.[20]
You might ask, “What does the timeline look like for the upcoming project?” or “Will the selected candidate be able to suggest new opportunities from growing sales?”[Edit]Closing the Interview
Thank the interviewer for their time and assistance. Your interviewer is probably really busy, so they’ll appreciate your acknowledgement of their time. Shake their hand and tell them that you’re appreciative of the chance to interview. Additionally, thank them for any special help they’ve given you, such as telling you more about the company, explaining where to park, or setting the interview at a time that works for you.[21]
Say, “Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me. I really appreciate the information you provided about this great opportunity.”
Tell the interviewer that you want the job. It’s common for people to change their mind about a job after their interview. Because of this, your interviewer is likely to focus on the candidates who seem the most excited about filling this position. Before you leave, make it clear that you want this job by directly telling the interviewer.[22]
You might say, “I know this job is a perfect fit for my skills, and I hope I get the chance to help your company reach its goals.”
Send a follow-up email or thank you note. Some interviewers perceive a follow-up as an indication that a person is really interested. For most jobs, it’s best to send a brief email telling the interviewer that you appreciate the opportunity and are available to discuss the job further. However, you might send a handwritten note if you work in a creative industry or the non-profit sector.[23]
Write, “Dear Mr. Jones, Thank you for taking the time to meet with me today. I’m even more excited about this opportunity. I’d really like the opportunity to talk to you more about what I can do for your company. Thanks, Amy Lincoln.”
Prepare to discuss your skills with several people at a second interview. During a second interview, you’ll typically expand on your work history and abilities, often with stories about your past jobs. Identify additional stories that you can use to show that you’ll fit into this position. Additionally, review a list of out-of-the-box interview questions so you can practice thinking on your feet.[24]
It’s likely that you’ll interview with a panel or several different people. Assume that you’re going to be talking to several people from different departments.
Get someone you trust to ask you a bunch of random questions so you can practice answering.[Edit]Additional Help
WH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e339831dca8f’)Sample Followup Interview QuestionsWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e339831dd3ae’)Sample Job Interview Questions and ResponsesWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e339831dde46’)Sample Interview Strengths and WeaknessesWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e339831de877’)Interview Tips and Tricks
[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
Don’t get off-topic because it can waste your interview time. Your interviewer likely has a block of time reserved for this interview, so use every moment to show why you’re a good fit.
If you don’t know an answer, admit that you need to learn more about that topic. Say, “I’m not as well-informed about that topic, but I’ll find the answer after this interview.”
If you have an interview with a company that you do not want to keep, you may need to decline it as soon as possible.[Edit]Warnings
Remember that your interviewer is a professional who’s interviewing you for a job. Don’t talk to them like they’re a friend or overshare information that’s not related to the job.
The interviewer may interrupt your flow to see how you react. If this happens, remain calm and helpful.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Keep a Job Interview on Track
Ask for a Job Interview
Go to an Interview
Dress for an Interview as a Man
Avoid Interview Mistakes
Cancel a Job Interview
Perform Well in a Group Interview
Ace a Job Interview (Teenage Girls)
Sell Yourself in Any Job Interview[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.inc.com/travis-bradberry/how-to-ace-the-50-most-common-interview-questions.html

↑ https://www.inc.com/travis-bradberry/how-to-ace-the-50-most-common-interview-questions.html

↑ https://www.inc.com/travis-bradberry/how-to-ace-the-50-most-common-interview-questions.html

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.forbes.com/sites/erikaandersen/2014/06/03/please-dont-do-these-9-things-in-an-interview/#70ec8a917a34

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.inc.com/travis-bradberry/how-to-ace-the-50-most-common-interview-questions.html

↑ https://www.inc.com/travis-bradberry/how-to-ace-the-50-most-common-interview-questions.html

↑ https://www.inc.com/travis-bradberry/how-to-ace-the-50-most-common-interview-questions.html

↑ https://www.livecareer.com/resources/interviews/prep/interview-success

↑ https://www.forbes.com/sites/erikaandersen/2014/06/03/please-dont-do-these-9-things-in-an-interview/#70ec8a917a34

↑ https://www.inc.com/travis-bradberry/how-to-ace-the-50-most-common-interview-questions.html

↑ https://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/how-to-prepare-for-a-great-job-interview-8-tips.html

↑ https://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/how-to-prepare-for-a-great-job-interview-8-tips.html

↑ https://www.inc.com/jeff-haden/how-to-prepare-for-a-great-job-interview-8-tips.html

↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-prepare-for-the-second-interview-2018-2

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How to Mine Bitcoins

You’ve heard of Bitcoin and you’re ready to get your hands on some digital wealth. However, this may be easier said than done. When you “mine” Bitcoin, you actually verify Bitcoin transactions in the public, decentralized ledger of Bitcoin transactions (called the blockchain). Every time you find a new block to add to the chain, the system gives you some Bitcoin as a reward. Back in the early days of Bitcoin, it was easy to mine Bitcoin using your own computer. However, as the cryptocurrency has become more popular, it has become all but impossible for individuals to make a profit mining Bitcoin. That doesn’t stop a lot of people from trying, though. If you want to mine Bitcoin, you can either sign up with a cloud-mining company or build your own mining rig to mine for yourself.[1]
[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Setting Up a Bitcoin Wallet
Download a software or mobile wallet if you’re just getting started. Software wallets are kept on your computer, while mobile wallets are apps that you install on your smartphone. Software and mobile wallets are reasonably secure, can be downloaded for free, and are suitable for smaller amounts of Bitcoin.[2]
You can find a list of secure wallets approved for use with Bitcoin at https://bitcoin.org/en/choose-your-wallet.
Some wallets are hybrid, meaning that you can access them through software on your computer and through an app on your mobile phone.
Invest in a hardware wallet if you’re serious about Bitcoin. Hardware wallets may set you back a couple of hundred dollars but are considered more secure. Since they aren’t connected to the internet, they aren’t vulnerable to hackers. If you intend to keep your Bitcoin long-term, a hardware wallet is likely a worthwhile investment.[3]
Trezor and Ledger are two of the more popular hardware wallets available. You can buy them online or at brick-and-mortar stores that sell computer supplies and accessories.
Enable all security features on your wallet. Once you’ve chosen a Bitcoin wallet, set it up for maximum security to protect your Bitcoin. Use two-factor authentication to secure your account. When you log in, a code will be sent to you in a text message or email. You have to enter the code to access your account. This makes your account less vulnerable to hacking.[4]
Make sure the password you choose is secure and would be difficult for anyone to guess. If you have a password manager on your computer or smartphone, you can use that to create a secure, encrypted password.[Edit]Getting a Cloud-Mining Contract
Decide which cloud-mining service provider to use. There are a number of different cloud-mining service providers available, some of which are better established than others. Each service charges different fees and has different contract packages available.[5]
Genesis, Hashflare, and Minex are some of the more popular cloud-mining services. However, the most popular services with the best reputations also are frequently sold out of contracts.
Research services carefully. There have been numerous cloud-mining scams. Make sure the company is legitimate and has a good reputation. You can search the name of the service and see what people are saying online about it. Websites such as CryptoCompare can also help you analyze company reputations. Visit https://www.cryptocompare.com/mining/#/companies to get started.
Be careful of a cloud-mining service that makes guarantees or claims that sound too good to be true. It is likely a scam. No cloud-mining service can guarantee you a particular rate of return, or guarantee that you’ll break even or start turning a profit in a short amount of time.
Pick a cloud mining contract package. With cloud-mining, you essentially lease mining power from a miner farm for a period of time. While your contract is active, you get all the Bitcoin that is mined using that amount of mining power, minus fees paid to the cloud-mining service for maintenance of the mining hardware.[6]
Contracts typically last from 1 to 3 years, although some last longer. While shorter contracts may carry a lower price tag, it’s unlikely that you’ll make any money in a shorter period of time. You usually need at least 2 years to break even.
Prices vary anywhere from under $100 for smaller contracts to several thousand dollars for larger contracts with more mining power – expressed as the hash rate. For example, as of 2019, Genesis offers a 2-year Bitcoin mining contract for $50, which gets you 1 TH/s (1 Tera hash per second, or 1,000,000,000,000 hashes per second). This sounds like a lot, but it’s unlikely that you’d do much more than break even in 2 years on such a small plan. At the other end of the spectrum, you could get a 5-year contract for $6,125 with 25 TH/s.
Withdraw your earnings to your secure wallet. When you purchase your contract, your mining power goes to work for you immediately. As you earn Bitcoin, it will show up on your account at the cloud-mining service. When you’ve accumulated enough, you can send it to your wallet.[7]
Some cloud-mining services may do regular payouts on an established schedule, such as once a month or once a quarter. Others may allow you to withdraw your earnings any time you want, as long as you have a minimum amount. The minimum can range anywhere from 0.05 BTC to 0.00002 BTC.[Edit]Using Your Own Hardware
Use an online mining calculator to calculate mining profitability. Mining rigs can be relatively expensive and consume a lot of power. Playing with different setups on an online mining calculator can help you determine whether it’s worth it to you to start mining.[8]
CryptoCompare has a mining calculator available at https://www.cryptocompare.com/mining/calculator/.
If you’re just getting started, you may not have all the information available, such as mining pool fees or power cost. However, the more information you provide, the more accurate the profitability estimate will be.
Buy ASIC miners and a power supply for your mining rig. An ASIC miner is an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) designed specifically to mine Bitcoin. Essentially, it’s a computer chip that needs a power supply to run it. ASIC miners vary in price depending on their hashing power and their efficiency.[9]
For example, the Bitmain Antminer S15 has a maximum hash rate of 28 TH/s and consumes 1596W of power. Over the course of a year, you could earn a little under $200 worth of Bitcoin with this miner, depending on the cost of your electricity. However, considering the miner costs between $1500 and $2000, it would still take you at least 7 to 10 years at that rate to start turning a profit, at the Bitcoin price of $4000.
You can monitor the price of Bitcoin to calculate changes in the time it will take to turn a profit. Profit may also vary based on the price of electricity.
Connect your miner and boot it up. Connect your power supply to your ASIC miner, then connect your miner to your router. Use an ethernet cable to connect your miner – a wireless connection is not stable enough.[10]
Type your router’s IP address in a web browser. This will take you to your router’s admin page. Click on “Connected Devices” to find the IP address for your ASIC miner. Copy and paste the IP address for your ASIC miner into your web browser. This will enable you to configure your miner.
Download Bitcoin mining software to a networked computer. After you’ve connected your hardware, you need to download software so you can mine Bitcoin. There are a number of different mining programs to choose from. Two of the most popular are CGminer and BFGminer. These are both command-line programs, so if you aren’t particularly tech-savvy, they may present a challenge for you.[11]
Most of the mining software that works on Windows will also work on Mac OS X machines.
EasyMiner has a graphical interface that is more intuitive and easier to use, especially if you’re a beginner with limited computer skills. EasyMiner works on Windows, Linux, and Android machines. As of 2019, EasyMiner does not have a Mac OS X version.
Join a mining pool. Mining pools are groups of miners that pool their hashing power to mine Bitcoin more quickly. A pool enables you to compete with massive mining conglomerates that have mining farms with tremendous hashing power. You don’t need to pay anything up front to join a mining pool. Instead, the pool takes a percentage of the Bitcoin mined (typically between 1 and 2 percent).[12]
BitMinter, CK Pool, and Slush Pool are some popular, successful, and well-established mining pools.
Without a mining pool, you would have to mine potentially for years before you’d see any profit. With a large pool, it’s possible that you could start earning Bitcoin within a few months.
Configure your miner to work in your mining pool. Once you’ve chosen your mining pool and set up a worker account, access your ASIC miner configuration screen and enter the IP address for your mining pool. Then enter the worker name and password you created for the mining pool. When you’ve entered this information, save your settings.[13]
As soon as you save your settings, your miner will start working in your mining pool. You can go to your mining pool account to see your status and evaluate your miner’s performance. However, keep in mind it may take up to an hour for your mining pool to display your miner’s hashing rate.
Transfer any Bitcoin you mine to your secure wallet. As you mine Bitcoin, it will show up in your mining pool account. Your mining pool may have a monthly or quarterly payout schedule, or you may be responsible for manually moving your Bitcoin from your account to your wallet.[14]
Some mining pools may only allow you to transfer Bitcoin to your wallet once you have a certain amount, typically around 0.001 BTC. You may be able to withdraw smaller amounts for a fee.[15][Edit]Warnings
Avoid buying a used ASIC miner. They are prone to burnout, and may not last long enough for you to make any profit.
Cryptocurrencies are volatile. The market value of Bitcoin can and does change frequently. Don’t invest any more money in Bitcoin than you can afford to lose.
Don’t try to mine Bitcoin using your own CPU or GPU. While this used to be possible, the blockchain is far too advanced now for this to be a viable option. You’ll end up spending more on electricity than you make in Bitcoin, and will likely burn out your computer equipment.[16][Edit]Related wikiHows
Mine Litecoins
Buy-Bitcoins
Use Bitcoin[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://99bitcoins.com/bitcoin-mining/

↑ https://www.buybitcoinworldwide.com/mining/software/

↑ https://www.buybitcoinworldwide.com/mining/software/

↑ https://bitcoin.org/en/secure-your-wallet

↑ https://www.bitcoinmining.com/getting-started/

↑ https://www.genesis-mining.com/pricing

↑ https://www.bitcoinmining.com/getting-started/

↑ https://www.investopedia.com/tech/how-does-bitcoin-mining-work/

↑ https://www.asicminervalue.com/miners/bitmain/antminer-s15-28th

↑ https://www.bitcoinmining.com/getting-started/

↑ https://www.buybitcoinworldwide.com/mining/software/

↑ https://www.bitcoinmining.com/getting-started/

↑ https://www.bitcoin.com/guides/how-to-setup-a-bitcoin-asic-miner-and-what-they-are

↑ https://www.bitcoin.com/guides/how-to-setup-a-bitcoin-asic-miner-and-what-they-are

↑ https://slushpool.com/release-notes/

↑ https://www.bitcoinmining.com/getting-started/

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Today in History for 30th January 2020

Historical Events

1933 – “Lone Ranger” begins a 21-year run on ABC radio
1940 – Cor Jongert wins 6th Dutch 11 Cities Skating Race
1944 – The Battle of Cisterna begins in central Italy
1964 – Ranger 6 launched; makes perfect flight to Moon, but cameras fail
1977 – Allan Border scores 36 in his 1st-class innings (NSW v Qld)
1979 – Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) agrees to new constitution

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1922 – Pal Jardanyi, Hungarian composer, born in Budapest, Hungary (d. 1966)
1937 – Boris Spassky, Russian chess player (world champion 1969-72, born in Leningrad, Russia
1941 – Dick Cheney, American politician (Vice President: 2001-2009), born in Lincoln, Nebraska
1953 – Fred Hembeck, American cartoonist, born in Yaphank, New York
1967 – Jay Gordon, American musician, born in San Francisco, California
1974 – Martina Jerant, Canadian basketball player (Olympics 1996), born in Windsor, Ontario

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1816 – Reinier Vinkeles, Dutch engraver and art collector, dies at 74
1976 – Percy Tyson “Plum” Lewis, cricketer (pair in only Test for S Af), dies
1987 – Angelo Rutherford, actor (Willie-Gentle Ben), dies at 32
1991 – John McIntire, American actor (Naked City, Wagon Train, Virginian), dies of emphysema at 83
1998 – Ricky Sanderson, stabbed 16-year old girl in NC, executed at 38
2018 – Mark Salling, American actor and musician (Glee), commits suicide at 35

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How to Apply for Survivor

Survivor is notoriously difficult to appear on, thanks to the huge number of applicants they receive for each season of the show. If you are determined to endure the long and grueling process, not to mention perform and compete on the program, then you will have to begin with the rest of the pack. Applying to be on Survivor requires you to either submit a video application that compels the casting crew to choose you for the next round, or to stand out at a local open casting call. With a little determination, and a few new skills, your application will shine and you may just have a chance at advancing as a semi-finalist.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Meeting Survivor’s Eligibility Requirements
Have a US or Canadian passport as a citizen. CBS has two requirements that applicants for Survivor must meet. The first of these is to be a citizen of either the United States or Canada, and to have a valid US or Canadian passport. Be sure to apply for a passport well before you plan to apply, if you don’t already have one.[1]
Having a passport is a requirement because Survivor is filmed on location around the world. Without a passport, you will not be able to film the show.
Be over 18 years of age, or older in certain US states. For most states and provinces, you simply have to be 18 or older to apply. Applying on your 18th birthday would be perfectly acceptable in these areas.[2]
Alabama and Nebraska residents must be 19 years or older.
Residents of Mississippi and the District of Columbia must be 21 years or older.
Be in good physical and mental shape. During later phases of the application process, if you proceed past the first, will be asked to complete medical history checks and undergo both physical and psychological fitness exams.[3]
You should be physically fit and have no major medical issues that could impact your performance.[Edit]Filming Your Application Video
Write a general sketch of your video. A Survivor application video must be no longer than 3 minutes, and should showcase your unique personality and features. Your video can take any format you choose, so long as you are showing off your life story and your experiences.
Successful videos are often filmed in a variety of scenic locations, mixed in with narration over videos and images that show off your past, your life experiences, and your day-to-day life.
Tell good stories about yourself. Using specific examples will always be better than listing facts about yourself. The video is a narrative like any other, and it should have a clear structure grounded in the story you want to tell about yourself.[4]
Bring up your most interesting traits. If you are from an area of the country most people have never been to, talk up your attachment to your community. If you work a particularly uncommon or difficult job, highlight the skills you have learned.
Relate yourself to the show. The casting crew wants to see your knowledge of the show along with your personality.
Use a camera to film your video, not a phone. Even though most smartphones have high quality cameras, it is better to rent or borrow a nice camera that will film you in the way only real cameras can. If you must use your phone, be sure to keep it horizontal, or landscape, rather than vertical.[5]
The casting team watches videos on a TV screen, so your video should have the right dimensions to comfortably be viewed on a TV.
Film your video in a quiet, well-lit space. You can film outdoors or indoors, but always choose a spot that is quiet and away from busy areas. The lighting should always be facing toward you. If the sun is directly behind you, move so that it is not making it hard to see your face.[6]
Filming outdoors can create an image that is in line with Survivor’s premise, by suggesting that you are comfortable outside.
Shoot outdoors during the day unless you have a good reason to film at night. Natural sunlight will be more flattering than no light or bright artificial ones.
Wind can make it difficult to hear your voice. Shoot outdoors only if it is not windy.
Give a good delivery. Speak in a clear voice that will be audible in the video. Enunciate your words and use a voice that is audible to everyone in the room. You should speak in a tone that readily grabs attention, rather than a monotone or one that conveys an over-eager attitude.[7]
Avoid reading from a script. Memorize at least the general structure of what you wrote, or memorize your lines cold if you wrote exactly what you plan to say.
You can also just improvise and try several different phrasings of each idea you plan to introduce. This will make sure your video has a natural, conversational flow.
Edit your video using editing software. There are many editing suites available to you. Apple computers come pre-installed with iMovie, while newer Windows computers have a simple editing tool in the Photos application.
There is also third party software available, like Lightworks, which is a free download, and Adobe Premiere, which is a more expensive and complicated option, with many more features.
At a minimum, you will have to learn how to import your raw footage and splice the clips together, cutting or “trimming” unnecessary footage.
Keep in mind that you are not being judged on your editing skills. The video can be a rough cut so long as it looks clean and your personality shines through.
Add pictures and videos of your daily life. As you edit, you will likely want to include images or videos that depict what you spoke about on camera, or ones you wrote down in your outline and plan to record a voice-over for.[8]
Be sure to keep the audio layer in place as you cut out the video and replace it with a new photo or clip, or add each layer separately for a voice-over. Most editing tools have separate audio and visual layers that you can freely edit.
Use a soundtrack under your narration to keep the pace up. While it is not necessary, adding a soundtrack with some of your favorite music that fits the image of yourself you are presenting can help your video feel more exciting.
Listening to someone talk for 3 minutes can be tiring, but with the right music you can liven up the casting crew’s experience.
You can use select portions of a few songs to mark transitions. When you switch topics, a new song can make the change clearer.
Attend a local casting call rather than film a video. At peak application times, usually in the months preceding a new season, CBS will host open casting calls in select US and Canadian cities. If you attend one of these, they will film your audition and there is no need to film a tape on your own. Be sure to bring your photo I.D. to an open call.[9]
An open call is a great opportunity for someone without the time or resources to write, film, and edit their own application video.
You can attend an open call in addition to submitting a video to raise your chances.
Check for open calls at https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/opencalls.[Edit]Filing Your Application Online
Go to the Survivor application website. The URL is https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/apply. There, you will find the online application for the show. Be prepared to fill out the entire application at once and upload both your application video and a recent photo of yourself in a standard file format.
You must complete the application in one sitting.
Enter your basic contact information. This includes your name, email, phone number, and address. This information will provide CBS with a way to reach out to you if you are accepted, as well as to narrow down candidates by location.[10]
Provide your appearance information. You will be asked to share your date of birth and gender, as well as your height, weight, hair color, and ethnicity. CBS will use this information to sort the applications and choose applicants in a certain demographic or appearance range to fill slots for each season.[11]
Describe your situation. The application asks for your current occupation and past education, your relationship status, and your familiarity with Survivor. You should be honest about your situation, and it should match the information you provided in your application video.[12]
Write a 500 character biography. You should take time to write a thoughtful, exciting, and compelling biography that summarizes who you are. Don’t copy what you say in your video, but do try to capture your main selling points briefly. This is a sales pitch for yourself, so be sure to take it seriously.[13]
Have a friend proofread your biography. You won’t want typos in your application, as this can reflect badly on you.
Share your social media accounts. CBS will want to know what your online presence is like, in order to confirm that you are a good fit for the show. The social media they request are Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.[14]
You may want to emphasize your worthy traits on social media in the months leading up to your application, but don’t cram them all in or make them seem forced.
Upload your picture. The picture should be a high quality portrait of you. There should not be anyone else in the photo, and your face should be clearly visible. The file must be less than 5MB, and in one of the following formats: .png, .jpg, .jpeg, or .gif.[15]
Your picture should be recent, and match the description you gave in the application.
Submit your video. The file you submit must be less than 50MB and be in one of the following formats: .mpg, .mpeg, .avi, .mp4, .wmv, .mov, .3gp, or .mkv. Before uploading, watch the video one more time to check for any problems with the file.[16]
Give your file a helpful name, like one that includes your full name and the phrase “Survivor Application Video”.
Wait for a response. Only those who CBS wishes to move forward are accepted as semi-finalists, so if you don’t hear back by the end of the September before the season you applied for, you most likely were not selected.
Submit a new application or attend a casting call again if yours was not accepted. While you will have to create a whole new video and file the application again, the good news is that you can apply as many times as you want. Unless you were a finalist in the casting process, you still have another chance at being on Survivor.[17][Edit]References↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/faq

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/faq

↑ https://denver.cbslocal.com/survivor-eligibility-requirments/

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/videotips

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/videotips

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/videotips

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/videotips

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/videotips

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/opencalls

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/apply

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/apply

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/apply

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/apply

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/apply

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/apply

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/apply

↑ https://www.cbssurvivorcasting.com/faq

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