How to Grow Ivy from Cuttings

Ivy is a prolific and lush plant that can add a lot of green to your landscape or your home. Whether you want ivy for your yard or for inside your home, growing ivy from cuttings is an easy process that will save you the cost of buying new plants. Start by gathering your cuttings, then root them in soil or water. Keep them in a warm area that gets indirect light and repot them the following spring. With just a little bit of effort and some time, you will have an abundance of new ivy plants that you didn’t have to purchase.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Gathering Your Cuttings
Take cuttings from ivy in the late summer or early fall. This is the time of year when there will be fresh growth on the plant, which is especially good for cuttings. Also, the weather will be ideal in the fall to get the cuttings started. Aim to take cuttings before cold weather sets in.[1]
Taking cuttings at this time of year will also make the timing right for planting your new plants in the spring if they are going outside.
Look for young, fresh growth on an existing plant. Ivy cuttings work best when they are made from the current year’s growth. You can identify new growth by looking for the parts of the ivy plant that look fresh and light green, not the older areas that have dark green leaves and thick stems.[2]
This kind of cutting is called a semi-ripe cutting. It is taken from this year’s growth, not older sections.
Avoid picking out pieces that are damaged or have unusual growth patterns.
Find a stem that has 3 to 4 nodes on it for best results. Hold the stem with 1 hand just above one of the nodes. Locate a spot right above the nodes or a set of leaves, so that the leaves will be left on the stem after you cut it.[3]
Use clean garden shears or a knife to cut off at least . Using clean shears will reduce the chance of introducing a disease or pest onto the cutting as you gather it. To sterilize your shears, wipe isopropyl or rubbing alcohol over the entire cutting surface of the shears. Then, cut straight across the stem with the shears.[4]
Wrap the cuttings in a damp towel and put them in a plastic bag. Wet a paper towel or rag and wrap it around the cut ends of the stems. Place the cuttings and the towel in a plastic bag to help keep them moist.[5]
This is especially important if you need to wait to put your cuttings in soil for an hour or more.
If possible, take your cuttings in the morning. The ivy plant will have a lot of moisture in it at that time, which can help to keep the cuttings moist.[Edit]Rooting Your Cuttings in Soil
Choose pots that are big enough to insert all of the cuttings into. If you are doing 6 cuttings or less, a standard pot will work well. If you are doing more than 6 cuttings, choose a bigger pot or several pots.
You can put cuttings in any type of pot, including terra cotta, plastic, and ceramic. However, no matter which you choose, the pots need to have drainage holes in the bottom.[6]
Putting several cuttings in one pot will cut down on the space required for the cuttings and it will also mean fewer pots to water. Since the plants will need to be repotted once they have rooted, they will be perfectly fine together in one pot for this period.
Fill the pots with soil and water them. Pick a general potting soil or a soil made specifically for propagation, which usually has a high percentage of perlite or sand. Fill each pot with soil until it is below the edge of the pot. Then, place the pot over a sink or set it outside, and fill the pot with water until it runs out of the bottom.[7]
Leaving the soil below the edge of the pot will allow you to water the cuttings without the water overflowing.
Put holes in the soil apart around the edge of the pot. Use the eraser end of a pencil to make the holes deep. This will allow you to put the cuttings into the soil without moving the rooting powder off the end of the cutting.[8]
Make as many holes as you have cuttings.
You can also use a skewer, dowel, or another small pointed object to make the holes.
Trim off the ends of the cuttings again. Then, prune away any leaves that are within of the end of the cutting. This will give you a clean and fresh end to insert into the soil.[9]
This is especially important if your cuttings were gathered longer than an hour or so ago, as the end of the cuttings is more likely to be dried out.
Use clean shears or a knife to make these additional cuts.
Dip the cut end of each cutting in rooting hormone. Open the container of rooting hormone and pick up your cutting. Dip the bottom of the cut end into the hormone. Lift it out to just above the surface of the hormone and tap it lightly to knock off any excess hormone.[10]
You can buy rooting hormone in powder or liquid form. It is available at most garden stores and from online retailers.
Place a cutting in each hole in the soil and secure it in place. Insert each cutting into an individual hole. Place the end with the rooting hormone into a hole until it hits the bottom. Hold the cutting upright with one hand and then press the soil around it so that it stays securely in place.
As you are inserting the cutting, try to keep it centered in the hole so that very little of the rooting hormone is knocked off. However, losing a little of it on the top edge of the hole is fine.[11]
Water the pot again until water runs out the bottom. Put the pot under a faucet or use a watering can to soak the soil. Keep watering in a light stream until water comes out of the bottom of the pot, which will signal that all of the soil is thoroughly moistened.
Be careful not to disturb the cuttings too much as you water. Keep the stream of water away from the base of the cuttings so that they stay securely in the soil.[Edit]Rooting the Cuttings in Water
Cut the stem just below the lowest root node. The nodes look like bumps on the stem where new stems and leaves grow out from. Use a clean knife or pair of sharp scissors and make the cut straight across the stem. Cut about below the node.[12]
If there are any leaves beside the bottom node, pinch or cut them off.[13]
Place the cutting in a clean cup with room-temperature water. Ensure that the water covers the bottom node on the stem and that there are not any leaves below the surface of the water. Pour out a little water if it’s covering a stem.[14]
Change the water once every 3 to 5 days and rinse the roots. Dump out the old water and replace it with new room-temperature water once every 3 to 5 days. When you do this, rinse off the roots with room-temperature water. You can also gently rub the roots with your fingers while you rinse them to remove any film that has gathered on the roots.[15]
Transfer the cuttings to soil once the roots are in length. Observe the roots as they grow and move your cutting to a pot filled with soil after the roots are about long. Check the length of the roots buy pulling the ivy stem out of the water and holding a ruler next to the roots. Measure from the bottom node to the end of the roots.[16][Edit]Caring for Cuttings as They Root
Place the pots or cups in a bright, warm location either inside or outside. The pots or cups need to be out of direct sunlight but they can’t be cold or light deprived. If the pots are inside, put them in a spot that is near a window that gets bright light but that will not shine directly on the cuttings. If you are keeping them outside, put them in a greenhouse, a propagator, or cover the pots with plastic bags and put them in a warm, bright spot out of direct sunlight.[17]
You will need to check on the moisture level of potted cuttings often, so put the cuttings somewhere you can easily access.
Keep the soil in potted cuttings damp at all times. Sprinkle the soil with water whenever the surface starts to dry out. The amount of time the soil takes to dry out will depend on the warmth and humidity where the plants are located.[18]
In many cases, a mister works well to keep outdoor cuttings wet while direct watering works well for indoor pots.
However, be careful not to drown the cuttings in too much water either. For example, don’t leave the pot sitting in water.
Remove any discolored or dead cuttings in the soil or water. In most cases, some of your cuttings won’t survive. If you see a cutting that has turned yellow, wilted, or has fallen over, remove it from the pot. Taking dead and diseased cuttings out of the pot or cup will help the other cuttings to thrive.[19]
When in doubt about whether a cutting is dead or dying, err on the side of caution and remove it. It’s best to have fewer healthy plants than to have lots of diseased ones.
Repot cuttings when they have new growth or wait until the spring. Climbers like ivy usually root in 1-2 months with proper care. Once you’re ready to repot them, pot them as you would any new plant, being careful with the roots and giving them rich soil to thrive in.[20]
If planting outdoors, you can put your young ivy plants in the ground or in a pot. However, keep in mind that a potted plant will need to be watered more often because it will dry out quicker.
Allow the new plants establish themselves for at least a few months before repotting them.[Edit]References↑ https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=474

↑ https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=474

↑ http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/basics/techniques/propagation_summercuttings1.shtml

↑ https://ipm.missouri.edu/MEG/2018/1/cleaning_pruning_tools/

↑ https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=474

↑ https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=474

↑ https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=474

↑ https://www.bhg.com/gardening/yard/garden-care/starting-flowers-from-cutting/

↑ https://www.planetnatural.com/plant-propagation/

↑ https://www.marthastewart.com/1535873/how-to-use-rooting-hormone

↑ https://www.planetnatural.com/plant-propagation/

↑ https://cleverbloom.com/root-plant-cuttings-water/

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-Xt-Ak8pe4&feature=youtu.be&t=535

↑ https://cleverbloom.com/root-plant-cuttings-water/

↑ https://cleverbloom.com/root-plant-cuttings-water/

↑ https://cleverbloom.com/root-plant-cuttings-water/

↑ https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=474

↑ https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/moisture_management_during_vegetative_cutting_propagation

↑ https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=474

↑ https://www.planetnatural.com/plant-propagation/

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Today in History for 3rd January 2020

Historical Events

1777 – General George Washington’s revolutionary army defeats British forces at Battle of Princeton, New Jersey
1852 – 1st Chinese arrive in Hawaii
1900 – Gerhart Hauptmann’s play “Schluck und Jau,” premieres in Berlin
1943 – 1st missing persons telecast (NYC)
1947 – William Dawson becomes 1st black to head congressional committee
2014 – Cambodian garment workers go on strike demanding a wage increase

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1828 – Karl Collan, Finnish composer
1886 – Arthur Mailey, Australian cricket spin bowler (21 Tests, 99 wickets; 10/66 v Gloucestershire 1921), born in Sydney, Australia (d. 1967)
1904 – Boris Kochno, Russian ballet dancer (La Chatte)
1939 – Janice Crosio, Australian politician
1970 – Matt Ross, American actor
1980 – Liya Kebede, Ethiopian model

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Famous Deaths

1795 – Josiah Wedgwood, English pottery designer and manufacturer (Wedgwood), dies at 64
1931 – Joseph J C Joffre, French marshal, dies at 78
1943 – Sir Walter James, Premier of Western Australia (b. 1863)
1956 – Joseph Wirth, 5th Chancellor of the Weimar Republic, Germany (Stalin Peace Prize), dies at 76
1972 – Frans Masereel, Flem WWII resistance fighter (Le Soleil), dies at 82
2011 – Fadil Hadžić, Croatian film director (b. 23 April 1922)

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How to Wall Mount an LCD TV

Mounting your LCD TV to your wall may seem challenging, but with the right tools, it’s a breeze. First, choose where you want to mount the TV and locate wall studs or install toggle snap anchors that you can use to support it. Then, install the mounting bracket to your wall and attach the mounting plate to the back of your TV. After that, connect the plate to the bracket on the wall, and kick back and enjoy your newly mounted TV!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Choosing a Mounting Location
Choose a wall where you want to place your TV. Pick a wall that allows the whole room to see the TV and will provide the best picture quality and won’t be affected by sunlight coming in from windows. You also need to consider the position of the furniture in the room and what direction they face.[1]
Because you need to screw holes into the wall to mount your LCD TV, be sure of your placement before you begin mounting it!
In a living room, the center of the wall across from the main entranceway allows for a wider viewing angle.
Position your TV so it’s at eye level. Place your TV on the wall where it’s most likely to be at eye level when you’re viewing it. If you plan to mostly watch it while sitting on the sofa you’ll want to place it lower than you would if you plan to mostly watch it while standing or at a bar. Use a ruler or tape measure to measure from the floor to the best height to put the TV at eye level and lightly mark the height with a pencil.[2]
Placing your TV at off of the ground will put the screen at eye level with the average adult sitting down.
If you plan to view the TV more often while standing, then mount it off of the ground.
Mount the TV as close to eye level as possible if there’s an obstruction such as an existing appliance or piece of furniture.
Select a location that allows you to conceal wires and devices. The cables and wires of your TV and any devices you plan to connect to it can be unsightly. When you’re picking a place to mount your TV, think about how difficult it will be for you to conceal them to help inform your decision.[3]
Centering the TV on a bare wall in the center of the room may make it difficult for you to hide the wires.
Use furniture placement to help conceal the wires.
Move any furniture, pictures, or decor from the area. You need to have a clear area to work in when you’re mounting your LCD TV. Slide over any chairs, tables, or sofas so you can access the wall easily. Take down any paintings, pictures, or decor so they’re out of your way.[4]
Gently place the items that were hanging on the wall nearby so you don’t crack or break them.
Take down anything hanging on the wall so they can’t wobble, shake, or potentially fall when you’re drilling into the wall.[Edit]Installing the Mounting Bracket
Line up the mounting bracket and mark where you plan to drill. Hold up the mount against the wall where you want to place the TV and use a level to make sure it’s straight. Then, take a pencil and lightly mark where you need to drill holes to mount the bracket to the wall.[5]
Make a pencil mark on the wall through the screw holes on the mounting bracket.
Set the bracket aside until you’re ready to mount it.
Find wall studs in the area with a stud finder. Look for studs in the area you plan to mount your LCD TV so you can install the framework into them. Take a stud finder and run the tool across the wall at the height you plan to mount the TV to locate studs you can use.[6]
Use a pencil to lightly mark the location of a stud on the wall.
You can purchase stud finders at hardware stores, department stores, and online.
Use a masonry bit to drill pilot holes into the marked areas. Fit a masonry bit into the end of your power drill. Drill pilot holes into the wall where you marked the locations of the screw holes with your pencil.[7]
The pilot holes will make it easier for you to install the screws that will support the mounting bracket.
Make sure you drill into a wall stud so the brackets are supported.
Insert toggle snap anchors if there aren’t any studs. Toggle snap anchors are plastic devices you can insert into your wall that will help support your TV if there aren’t any studs. Use a drill bit to drill holes into the wall where you need to install the snap anchors to mount the bracket. Push the snap anchors into the holes so they’re secure.[8]
Make sure all of the toggle snap anchor is fully inserted into the wall.
Line up the mounting bracket up with the pilot holes or toggle snap anchors. After you drill all of the pilot holes or install the toggle snap anchors, replace the bit with a screwdriver bit that fits the mounting screws. Hold up the mounting bracket to the wall and line up the screw holes with the pilot holes or toggle snap anchors.[9]
Hold the bracket so it’s flush against the wall.
Drill the mounting screws into the pilot holes or toggle snap anchors. Apply pressure against the bracket to hold it flush against the wall. Then, drill the mounting screws through the screw holes of the bracket and into the pilot holes that you drilled or the toggle snap anchors that you installed.[10]
Drill the screws all the way into the stud or anchor so they secure the bracket.
Wiggle the bracket to make sure it’s secure and tighten the screws if there’s any movement.[Edit]Attaching the TV to the Bracket
Locate the mounting plate attachment holes on the back of your TV. On the back of your LCD TV are holes that correspond to the screw holes on the mounting plate. If there are already screws in the holes, remove them so you can attach the plate.[11]
They may also be covered in plastic if you just bought your TV.
Attach the mounting plate to your TV. Fit the screws through the screw holes of the mounting plate and into the corresponding holes on the TV. After you slide the screws through the slots, attach the nuts to the screws and tighten them so the mounting plate is flush against the back of the TV.[12]
The mounting plate will support the TV on the bracket, so make sure the nuts are tight on the screws!
Give the mounting plate a good shake to make sure there isn’t any movement. If there is, tighten up the nuts on the screws.
Line up the mounting plate with the bracket on the wall. Pick up the TV and hold it up to the mounting bracket on the wall. Align the mounting plate on the back of the TV with the slot that the plate will fit into on the bracket.[13]
Use another person to help you hold the TV up against the wall.
Connect the mounting plate to the bracket. Depending on the mounting plate and bracket that you have, you may need to slide the plate into a slot on the bracket. You may also need to screw the mounting plate to the bracket. Check the manufacturer’s instructions to make sure you’re connecting the plate to the bracket correctly.[14]
Conceal the cables with a cord cover. A cord cover is a plastic track that mounts directly to the wall on top of the wires to hide them. Use screws to mount the base to the wall beneath your TV and lay the cords inside of them. Then, snap the plastic cover in place on top of it.[15]
Choose a cord cover color that blends into your wall so it’s less noticeable.
You can remove the top of the cover at any time if you need to adjust or add additional wires.
Finished.[Edit]Tips
Have another person help you mount the LCD TV to make the job easier.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Power drill
TV mounting bracket
TV mounting plate
Ruler or measuring tape
Pencil
Cord cover
[Edit]References↑ https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-high-to-mount-tv/

↑ https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-high-to-mount-tv/

↑ https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-high-to-mount-tv/

↑ https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-high-to-mount-tv/

↑ https://youtu.be/XJEmJhEleH0?t=192

↑ https://youtu.be/NFQCh6A4BE4?t=58

↑ https://youtu.be/XJEmJhEleH0?t=236

↑ https://youtu.be/LQ2OvixnExQ?t=247

↑ https://youtu.be/XJEmJhEleH0?t=351

↑ https://youtu.be/XJEmJhEleH0?t=377

↑ https://youtu.be/XJEmJhEleH0?t=27

↑ https://youtu.be/XJEmJhEleH0?t=27

↑ https://youtu.be/NFQCh6A4BE4?t=126

↑ https://youtu.be/NFQCh6A4BE4?t=126

↑ https://www.bobvila.com/articles/how-to-hide-tv-wires/

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