How to Clean an Oven with Vinegar

If your oven is coated in grime or smells bad, it may be time to give it a clean. Oven cleaners often contain harsh chemicals, and the self-cleaning option on ovens can create a burnt, smoky, smelly mess. To clean your oven using vinegar, try combining it with baking soda or steaming it with water in your oven to scrub out grease and grime using natural ingredients.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using Baking Soda and Vinegar
Take out the oven racks and set them aside. If your oven racks are dirty, put them on a towel so they don’t get your surface dirty. If you have a pizza stone or thermometer in your oven, take those out as well. Make sure there are no pots or pans in your oven before you clean it.[1]
Make a paste out of baking soda and water. Mix ½ cup (170 g) of baking soda with of water in a small bowl. Combine the ingredients with a spoon until they make a thick, spreadable paste. If your mixture is still powdery, add more water until it is more spreadable.[2]If the paste is too watery, it won’t spread as well. Add more baking soda if you need to.
Coat your oven in the paste. Wear rubber gloves to protect your hands. Pick up small bits of your baking soda paste and spread it on the bottom, sides, and top of your oven. Add more paste to surfaces that are especially grimy, like the bottom of your oven.[3]
Let the paste sit in your oven for 12 hours. Leave the paste in your oven overnight, or for about 12 hours. If you are pressed for time, you can let the paste sit for 1 hour instead, but it may not remove all of the grime in your oven.[4]
Baking soda works to break down grease and grime in your oven.
Do not use your oven while the paste is still in it. Heating up the baking soda will cause it to burn and create even more of a mess in your oven.
Wipe out the oven with a damp towel. Wear gloves to protect your hands. Use a damp towel or cloth to wipe out the majority of the baking soda paste. Pay special attention to areas that are coated in grime. Scrub firmly to remove most of the dirt and grime.[5]If you run into any especially stubborn areas, use a spatula to scrape them off.
Spray white vinegar throughout your entire oven. Put white vinegar into a spray bottle. Spray the entire interior of your oven. Pay special attention to areas that might have baking soda residue, like the corners and the bottom of your oven.[6]The vinegar will react with the baking soda and create a foam. This is normal, and will help to clean your oven.
Wipe out the oven with a damp towel. Use warm water to help break down any remaining grime in your oven. Be sure to wipe out all areas of your oven so there is no baking soda or vinegar left. Let your oven dry completely before you turn it on to use it again.[7]Use a dry towel to wipe down your oven and speed up the drying process.[Edit]Steaming Your Oven with Vinegar
Wipe out any loose debris in the oven. Use a paper towel or cloth to wipe out any large chunks of dried food or grime from your oven. Don’t scrub too hard, since these will be dry and hard to get out. Chip out large debris with a spatula.[8]You can also use a handheld vacuum to get rid of chunks of debris in your oven.
Boil ⅓ of a pot of water. Fill a pot ⅓ of the way full. Boil it on high heat on the stovetop. Watch for large bubbles that pop at the top of the water to tell when it is boiling. If the water starts to boil over, turn the heat down slightly.[9]
Add an equal part of white vinegar to the pot. Fill your pot up another ⅓ of the way with white vinegar. These measurements can be approximate. Let the pot boil for another 30 seconds, then turn off the heat.[10]
Place your pot of water and vinegar onto the bottom rack of your oven. Use oven mitts to transfer your pot to the bottom rack of your oven. If you have taken your racks out to clean them, just place the pot on the bottom of the oven. Make sure there are no empty dishes or thermometers in your oven.[11]
Close the oven door and let the pot sit for 45 minutes. The hot water will create steam and spread vinegar and hot water all over your oven. This will soften the grease and grime in your oven, making it easier to clean. Close your oven door to trap the steam and let the pot sit for at least 45 minutes.[12]Do not let the pot sit for more than 1 hour, or else the water will start to cool and become less effective.
Wipe out your oven with a damp cloth. Use hot water to help break down any grime. Remove the oven racks for an easier reach. Use a metal spatula to scrape out any difficult or crusted grime.[13]Make sure to wipe out your entire oven before you use it again.[Edit]Cleaning Your Oven Racks
Place your oven racks in the bathtub. Clear your bathtub of any shampoos or soaps. If your bathtub is dirty, clean it out before you start. Place your oven racks in your bathtub. Set them on top of each other or side by side.[14]
Sprinkle baking soda over the oven racks. Make sure all of the racks are covered with baking soda. Shake a liberal amount of baking soda over your oven racks. Flip the racks over to make sure each side gets baking soda on it. Apply more on spots that are especially dirty.[15]Baking soda will work to naturally break down grease on your oven racks.
Spray your oven racks with white vinegar. Put white vinegar into a spray bottle. Douse your oven racks with the vinegar. The vinegar and baking soda will react, creating a foam on your oven racks. Make sure you spray vinegar on every side of each oven rack.[16]The foam works to break down grease and grime.
Submerge the oven racks in hot water overnight. Fill your bathtub with hot water. Make sure the oven racks are completely submerged in the water. Let them sit for about 12 hours or overnight. Do not take them out of the water early, or they may dry with the grime still on them.[17]
Scrub away any grime left on the racks with a sponge or towel. Use an old sponge brush or towel to wipe away stubborn grime that is left on your oven racks. The combination of vinegar, baking soda, and water will make the grime much easier to take off. Use a metal spatula to chip off any stubborn grime.[18]You can also use a scrub brush to wipe away the grime.
Rinse your oven racks with cool water and let them dry. Wash off any residual vinegar or baking soda with cool water in your bathtub. Use a towel to dry your oven racks or let them air dry completely before putting them back in your oven. Rinse your bathtub out to wash any residual vinegar or baking soda down the drain.[19][Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Using Baking Soda and Vinegar
Baking soda
Small bowl
White vinegar
Spray bottle
Gloves
Towel[Edit]Steaming Your Oven with Vinegar
Large pot
White vinegar
Towel[Edit]Cleaning Your Oven Racks
Baking soda
White vinegar
Sponge or towel[Edit]References↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-clean-an-oven-cleaning-lessons-from-the-kitchn-201191

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-clean-an-oven-cleaning-lessons-from-the-kitchn-201191

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-an-oven

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-an-oven

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-clean-an-oven-cleaning-lessons-from-the-kitchn-201191

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-clean-an-oven-cleaning-lessons-from-the-kitchn-201191

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-an-oven

↑ https://littlegreendot.com/no-stress-steam-oven-cleaner/

↑ https://www.realsimple.com/home-organizing/cleaning/oven-cleaning-hacks

↑ https://www.realsimple.com/home-organizing/cleaning/oven-cleaning-hacks

↑ https://www.realsimple.com/home-organizing/cleaning/oven-cleaning-hacks

↑ https://www.realsimple.com/home-organizing/cleaning/oven-cleaning-hacks

↑ https://littlegreendot.com/no-stress-steam-oven-cleaner/

↑ https://www.kitchenistic.com/clean-oven-racks/

↑ https://www.kitchenistic.com/clean-oven-racks/

↑ https://www.firstforwomen.com/posts/how-to-clean-oven-157067

↑ https://www.firstforwomen.com/posts/how-to-clean-oven-157067

↑ https://www.firstforwomen.com/posts/how-to-clean-oven-157067

↑ https://www.kitchenistic.com/clean-oven-racks/

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Today in History for 9th January 2020

Historical Events

1957 – Dutch Newspaper Society expels communist daily paper “Truth”
1977 – Super Bowl XI, Rose Bowl, Pasadena, CA: Oakland Raiders beat Minnesota Vikings, 32-14; MVP: Fred Biletnikoff, Oakland, WR
1979 – Bobby Orr’s #4 jersey is retired by the Boston Bruins
1990 – US Supreme Court strikes down Dallas’ ordinance imposing strict zoning on sexually oriented businesses
1995 – Ecuador and Peru involved in boundary fight
1996 – First episode of “Third Rock from the Sun” screened on NBC

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1894 – Henryk Stazewski, Polish abstract painter and graphic artist
1940 – Barbara Buczek, Polish composer, born in Kraków, Poland (d. 1993)
1948 – Bill Cowsill, American singer and musician (The Cowsills – We Can Fly), born in Newport, Rhode Island
1959 – Cristi Minculescu, Romanian musician, born in Pitești, Romania
1967 – Dave Matthews, South African singer and musician (Dave Matthews Band), born in Johannesburg, Transvaal, South Africa
1972 – Angie Martinez, American radio and television personality, born in Brooklyn, New York

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1863 – Ferdinand Huber, Swiss composer, dies at 71
1971 – Elmer Flick, baseball player (b. 1876)
1979 – Pier Luigi Nervi, Italian engineer and architect (Nuove Struttura), dies at 87
2008 – Mehran Ghassemi, Iranian journalist (b. 1977)
2016 – Ed Stewart, British DJ and broadcaster (Crackerjack), dies of a stroke at 74
2018 – Odvar Nordli, 21st Prime Minister of Norway (Labour: 1976-81), dies at 90

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Prepare for High Altitude

High altitude locations are some of the most beautiful and popular places to travel for vacation and work alike. However, about 20 to 50% of people who travel to high altitudes experience 1 or more of the common side effects of altitude sickness. By planning your trip, acclimating to the elevation, and properly dealing with altitude sickness, you can enjoy your time up high.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Planning Your Trip
Plan your ascent into high altitude ahead of time. One of the most important things to do to prepare to enter a higher altitude is to schedule your ascent ahead of time so you can build in time for your body to acclimate and adjust.[1] If you are able to spend a day or two at a more moderate elevation (under ), you can give your body a chance to adjust to the higher altitude before ascending further, or give any side effects you may experience time to subside.
In most minor cases, people only experience side effects for the first 1 to 2 days after arriving at a higher elevation.
About 20% of people who travel to altitudes between and experience side effects. This number increases to about 50%, however, in altitudes higher than .
Hydrate well before entering a higher altitude. Arguably the easiest way to help you prepare for high altitude is to drink plenty of water before you travel, as well as during your ascent into a higher altitude.[2] Drinking at least of water in the days before your trip can help your body adjust to the high altitude quicker and ward off some of the unpleasant side effects.
To help you keep hydrating while traveling, bring a large water bottle with you. Try to keep track of how much water you are drinking and refill the bottle as frequently as you are able to.
Get plenty of sleep before ascending into higher altitudes. Being well rested is an important factor in helping you both avoid and get over the side effects of high altitude. In many cases, however, traveling can interrupt your sleep schedule. While you may not be able to avoid the impact of travel on your sleep schedule, you can make sure that you can plenty of sleep in the days leading up to your ascent into a higher altitude.[3]
Try to get at least 7 or 8 hours of sleep in the days leading up to your trip into a higher altitude.
Avoid caffeine and alcohol for at least 1 day in advanced. Drinking alcohol and caffeine in the days before you travel, as well as once you are traveling, can dehydrate your body, impact your ability to sleep well, and weaken your ability to fight any symptoms of altitude sickness.[4] As a result, try to avoid consuming any caffeine or alcohol for at least 1 day before you travel, as well as while you are traveling.
If you do choose to consume caffeine or alcohol while preparing for high altitude, make sure that you drink plenty of water to try to offset some of the negative effects.
Train if you plan to do any rigorous physical activity. If you plan on hiking, mountain biking, or doing any other physical activity once you arrive in a higher altitude, training accordingly can help your body ward off or bounce back quicker from altitude-related illness. While even professional athletes can suffer from the effects of high altitude, your body will be able to perform under the added stress of high altitude if you are physically ready for the activity at hand.[5]
If you plan to go hiking, for example, try doing several hikes near where you live. This can help you get in the physical condition needed to complete the hike while getting your body used to the ascent into a higher altitude.
Get a prescription to help you adjust to the elevation (optional). While most people can acclimate to higher altitude naturally with a bit of preparation and time, there are prescription medications that you can get before you leave that will help your body adjust more quickly. If you know that you won’t be able to schedule adequate time to acclimate, or if you have experienced severe altitude sickness before, talk to your doctor about possibly getting a prescription medication to help you when you travel.[6]
Acetazolamide and dexamethasone are both prescription medications that you can take before and during your travel to a higher altitude.[7]
Buy a supplemental oxygen can to help you avoid side effects (optional). Once you are in a high altitude, you can help avoid or alleviate symptoms of altitude sickness by purchasing a personal oxygen can.[8] Oxygen cans are relatively inexpensive, easy to use, and are readily available online and in pharmacies, grocery stores, and outdoor supply stores that are in higher altitude locations.
Many hotels and outdoor sporting companies in higher altitudes will also have a supplemental oxygen source on-hand.[9][Edit]Acclimating to the Elevation
Ascend into higher altitudes slowly so your body can adjust. Once you are in a higher altitude, try to give your body time to acclimate to the increase in elevation. The likelihood that you will suffer from side effects increases with every increase in elevation. You can try to offset this, however, by spending a day or so at each high altitude elevation before ascending higher.[10]
Avoid ascending more than per day. To help give your body time to acclimate to the elevation, try to avoid ascending more than per day.[11] This will help you prevent altitude sickness and therefore, enjoy your trip much more.
If you are particularly sensitive to higher altitude, you may want to avoid ascending more than per day.
Eat and drink water frequently to avoid altitude sickness. Staying hydrated and well-nourished can help you ward off many of the unpleasant side effects of high altitude, such as dizziness and headaches.[12] Try to eat at least 3 healthy meals per day, and keep snacks and a water bottle with you at all times until you are sure that your body has acclimated.
Granola bars are a great option for a quick and easy snack to have on-hand.
Steer clear of strenuous exercise for about 1 day. After arriving in a higher altitude, try to avoid any strenuous exercise for the first 24 hours. This will give your body time to adjust to the elevation. If you push yourself too hard before your body has acclimated, there is a good chance that you will experience some of the symptoms of altitude sickness.[13][Edit]Dealing with Altitude Sickness
Stop ascending until your symptoms have subsided. If you experience any of the symptoms of altitude sickness, avoid ascending to a higher elevation. If your symptoms are mild, you can usually wait for your body to acclimate to your current altitude and then proceed with your ascent.[14] If your symptoms are severe and persistent, however, you will likely need to descend and in some cases, seek medical attention.
Common symptoms of altitude sickness include dizziness, headache, vomiting, swelling, slightly elevated heart rate, temporary shortness of breath, coughing, congestion, and trouble walking.[15]
If your symptoms are mild and temporary, you can likely proceed with your ascent after 24 to 48 hours.[16]
If any of the common symptoms of altitude sickness are prolonged (more than 1 to 2 days) or particularly painful or uncomfortable, they should be considered severe.
Additional severe symptoms of altitude sickness include a high altitude cerebral edema, pulmonary edema, and blurred vision.[17]
Eat and drink water to help your symptoms subside. If you are suffering from altitude sickness, hydrating consistently and eating a substantial meal or snack can help you begin to acclimate.[18] Even if you feel nauseous, it is important that you try to eat and drink water as often as you can in order to feel better quickly.
Move to a lower altitude if your symptoms are persistent or severe. If your altitude sickness is persistent, severe, or gets worse over time, descend to a lower altitude as soon as possible.[19] Your symptoms should begin to subside as you descend.
If your symptoms don’t begin subside after you descend, you may need to seek medical attention.
Use an over-the-counter pain reliever to help with side effects. If you experience some of the side effects of high altitude despite your preparation, it can be helpful for you to have some over-the-counter pain relievers on hand.[20] Pain relievers like aspirin should be taken sparingly and in consultation with your doctor or pharmacist, however, as they will only treat the symptoms but do not help your body adjust or improve your oxygenation.[21]
Take a prescription medication to help alleviate your symptoms quickly. If you got a prescription for acetazolamide or dexamethasone, you can take either of these medications to help your body adjust to the elevation.[22] By helping your body adjust to the elevation, these medications can help alleviate your symptoms and get over your altitude sickness more quickly.
Use supplemental oxygen to relieve your altitude sickness. If you purchased an oxygen can prior to your ascent, you can use it as directed to help alleviate your altitude sickness. If you don’t have a personal oxygen can, you may be able to get supplemental oxygen from a hotel, sporting company, emergency relief officials, or medical facility.[23][Edit]References↑ https://health.clevelandclinic.org/understanding-altitude-sickness-5-best-tips-for-your-next-mountain-trip/

↑ https://health.clevelandclinic.org/understanding-altitude-sickness-5-best-tips-for-your-next-mountain-trip/

↑ https://health.clevelandclinic.org/understanding-altitude-sickness-5-best-tips-for-your-next-mountain-trip/

↑ https://health.clevelandclinic.org/understanding-altitude-sickness-5-best-tips-for-your-next-mountain-trip/

↑ https://www.womenshealthmag.com/fitness/a19917133/train-for-high-elevation-workouts/

↑ http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/ccdr-rmtc/07pdf/acs33-05.pdf

↑ http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/ccdr-rmtc/07pdf/acs33-05.pdf

↑ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1114067/

↑ https://health.clevelandclinic.org/understanding-altitude-sickness-5-best-tips-for-your-next-mountain-trip/

↑ https://health.clevelandclinic.org/understanding-altitude-sickness-5-best-tips-for-your-next-mountain-trip/

↑ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/altitude-sickness/

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/altitude-sickness-a-to-z

↑ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/altitude-sickness/

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/altitude-sickness-a-to-z

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/altitude-sickness-a-to-z

↑ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/altitude-sickness/

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/altitude-sickness-a-to-z

↑ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/altitude-sickness/

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/a_to_z/altitude-sickness-a-to-z

↑ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/altitude-sickness/

↑ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC28508/

↑ http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/publicat/ccdr-rmtc/07pdf/acs33-05.pdf

↑ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1114067/

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