How to Start Biking

Getting into the habit of biking daily can be quite easy so long as you get the right equipment and don’t get too ambitious at the beginning. To start, choose between a road or mountain bike based on the type of terrain that you’ll be biking on. Then, get a solid helmet and download a cycling app that will make it easy to track your distance and speed. Start off with a small goal of biking per ride. Bike 2-4 times a week based on your level of comfort until you’re able to bike for longer distances more regularly.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Buying a Bike
Get a mountain bike if you want to ride on unpaved surfaces. Mountain bikes aren’t exclusively for mountains! If you plan on regularly riding on dirt, unpaved gravel, or grass, select a mountain bike to make your experience more comfortable. Mountain bikes are heavier and have strong frames, which helps keep them from breaking or losing traction on rocky terrain or bumpy surfaces.[1]
If you’re going to be biking over long distances, look for a bike with a clip for your water bottle.
Mountain bikes can be kind of heavy and bulky. If you plan on keeping it in your home, keep the storage space in mind when looking at a bike.
A used mountain bike will usually cost $100-300. New mountain bikes tend to be at least $400, but you’ll regularly see prices in the $1000-2000 range.
Select a lightweight road bicycle if you’ll be riding on paved roads. If you’re going to be doing most of your biking on streets or paved trails, select a road bike. Road bikes are smaller than mountain bikes and have thinner wheels, which makes it easier to get them up to a higher speed. Road bikes are also lighter, which makes them easier to steer, carry, and maneuver.[2]
If you live in an apartment and will ever have to bring your bike inside, a road bike will be easier to store than a mountain bike.
Used mountain and road bikes tend to be equally expensive. Expect to spend $100-300 on a used road bike. A new road bike will cost $400-$1000.
Racing bicycles are a type of road bike. They tend to be extremely light and they’re designed to go as fast as possible on paved surfaces. They tend to be quite expensive and fragile though, so don’t pick a racing bike to start unless you’re always going to be biking on smooth pavement with no obstacles.
Get a folding bicycle if you’re tight on space or live in an apartment. If you live in a second or third-floor apartment or you have no storage space whatsoever, buy a folding bicycle. Folding bikes can be easily disassembled to make them smaller, and they are extremely lightweight. However, they can’t go very fast and they’re awful at making it up hills. This makes folding bikes an excellent option if your only purpose is to make short trips in a congested area.[3]
Folding bikes are usually a little cheaper than a mountain or road bike. New folding bikes are usually $100-300, but they’re even cheaper if you can find a used one.
Buy a used bike if you’re just starting out. The cost differential between new and used bikes can be quite extreme. You can get a solid used bike for $150, but a decent model that is brand new may cost you $500-1,000. Since you’re just starting out, you may not know what your preferences are. If you get a new bike and it turns out that it isn’t right for you, you’ll be out quite a bit of money. On the other hand, selling a used bike and getting a different model isn’t that big of a deal.[4]
Used bikes aren’t necessarily worse than new bikes. They just tend to not be as shiny and may not have a ton of features. A used bike can ride just as well as a new bike, though.
Avoid a custom or fixed-gear bike until you’re used to biking regularly. To save yourself some money and heartbreak, wait until you know precisely what you’re looking for before buying a custom or fixed-gear bike. Fixed-gear bikes don’t have brakes, and they can be quite difficult to get used to if you’ve never controlled one. Custom bikes will come with features and components that you won’t even notice unless you’re a veteran rider.[5]
Custom bikes use specific, buyer-requested components to achieve a certain weight balance, feel, and frame structure. This is unnecessary for someone that’s just starting out.
Go to a reputable bike shop and get a bike that feels right. Don’t buy your bike online. Instead, go to a local bike shop and ask to test ride some models that look interesting to you. When taking a test ride, make sure that the bike is comfortable and feels good in your hands. Your bike should be easy to maneuver and pedal. Once you’ve found a bike that you like, pay for it and enjoy your new ride.[6]
While some high-end bike shops don’t sell used models, almost every other bike shop sells used bikes.
Don’t worry if the bike squeaks when you ride it. The shop will adjust the brakes and oil the chain for you before you walk off with it.
Buy a bike with gears. This will make it easier to control how fast you pedal. Almost all road and mountain bikes have gears. The gears look like little knobs or switches on the handlebar that you can turn to change the track that the chain is on.[Edit]Getting the Appropriate Gear
Buy a new helmet that fits your head comfortably. A helmet is mandatory if you want to ride a bike. Get a helmet with a hard shell that fits your head. The helmet should be tight enough that it doesn’t fall off while you’re riding, but loose enough that it doesn’t hurt when you wear it for an extended period of time.[7]
The difference in pricing between helmets is usually based on how aerodynamic or stylish it is. Unless you plan on racing in the future, go ahead and grab a cheaper model. Feel free to spend a little for a fashionable helmet, though!
Select a comfortable pair of bike shorts if you’re taking long rides. All of the fancy bike clothing isn’t mandatory for an amateur cyclist, although it does serve a purpose. If you are certain that biking is going to become a regular activity for you, pick up a comfortable pair of bike shorts. Bike shorts are tighter, and usually made of spandex or nylon. They’re designed to keep your thighs from chaffing and your pants from catching in the chain as you ride.[8]
You can ride a bike while wearing regular pants if you’d like. Sweatpants, jeans, and athletic shorts are all perfectly fine to bike in. If you do find your pants getting caught in the chain regularly, roll your left pant leg up to keep it raised about the gears.
Purchase a cycling jersey if you want to stay dry while you ride. Bike jerseys are tight-fitting nylon or spandex shirts. They tend to be brightly colored so that you’re highly visible when riding at night. They’re also highly absorbent and will soak up sweat as you ride to keep you dry. Get a comfortable bike jersey that fits well to stay dray and visible.[9]
Again, specialized cycling clothing isn’t required if you’re a beginner. You can easily ride in a T-shirt, tank top, sweater, or jacket.
If you’re going to wear a regular shirt and bike at night, throw on a reflective vest so that drivers and pedestrians can easily see you.
Wear athletic shoes before moving up to cycling shoes. Cycling shoes have ridges that hook into the grooves of some bike pedals. Since you’re probably starting out with standard pedals, they aren’t necessary. Wear a good pair of tennis or running shoes when starting out. Tie your laces tight and double-knot your shoes to keep the laces from getting caught in the chain. If they do get caught regularly, you can tuck your laces into your shoes before you get on your bike.[10]
The other purpose of cycling shoes is to make your energy transfer more efficient as you ride. Your goal when starting out should be to maintain a good posture and get in the habit of biking, though. If you only care about speed, you’re going to get frustrated when you start biking.
Get an air pump to avoid making frequent trips to the gas station. The air in bike tires naturally escapes over time, even if you don’t have a punctured tire and keep your air valve capped tight. To avoid having to ride to the gas station every couple of weeks, get an air pump to refill your bike’s tires.[11]
Get a manual pump if you want to save money. Buy an electric or mechanical air pump if you want to make filling your tires easier.
Download a cycling app to track your distance and speed. Instead of spending money on a fancy pedometer or GPS system, download an app to track how far and fast you bike. Bike Computer, Strava, and MapMyRide are the most popular apps for bikers. They’ll track your speed, route, and monitor how often you ride. This information is important when it comes to tracking your progress.[12]
Strava, Bike Computer, and MapMyRide are all free. You can download them from your phone’s app store.
You can connect a Bluetooth heart rate monitor to Strava and Bike Computer if you’d like.[Edit]Riding Your Bike
Adjust the saddle so that your knee is slightly bent as you pedal. When your pedals are the closest to the ground, your knee should be slightly bent to avoid putting stress on your tendons and hamstrings. Adjust your saddle by lifting the latch and pulling it out to the unlocked position. Then, slide your seat up or down to adjust its height. Close the latch and press it tight to lock your seat in place.[13]
Develop a posture that’s comfortable for you to maintain. There is no proper stance for typical cycling, but the straighter you can keep your spine, the better. When riding your bike, keep the crest of the seat aligned with the center of your tailbone. Stay seated while pedaling and try to sit up straight while staying comfortable. The more relaxed you are while you ride, the more likely you are to bike for an extended period of time.[14]
Ride with your hands in the drops of the handles to steer and brake. The drops of the handles refer to the loop where the handles dip down. Place both hands on the bottom of the handle to make steering and braking easier. On a mountain bike, there are no drops, so place your hands where it’s comfortable and easy to reach the brakes.[15]
When you do brake, use the back brake to make gradual stops. If you need to make an emergency stop, pull both brakes at the same time, pulling the front brake as light as possible to avoid flipping over.
Develop a pedaling cadence of 70-90 rpm to bike efficiently. When biking, your body is most efficient when it’s pedaling a little over once per second. To develop a good pedaling pattern, turn the gears on the front of your bike until you can comfortably bike at a rate of 70-90 rotations per minute (rpm). This will require some trial and error, so switch your gears around as you start to ride to determine what works best for you.[16]
The gears control which track the chain hangs on, which changes the amount of resistance that you experience as you pedal. They’re designed to make it easier to maintain your pace while biking up or down a hill. On flat surfaces, use them to adjust how fast you need to pedal.
Almost all racing and mountain bikes have gears.
Look down the road or trail as you’re biking to avoid obstacles. To avoid running into potholes, rocks, or obstructions, look up while you’re biking. Your first temptation may be to look down at your handlebar to focus on your body’s motions, but this can be dangerous. Keep your eyes down the road or trail to avoid running into something.[17]
It’s fine if it’s a little more comfortable for you to tilt your head down. Just make sure that you’re looking up while you do this.
Communicate with drivers by using hand signals on public roads. To avoid startling drivers, communicate when you plan to stop or turn. To indicate that you are turning left, extend your left arm straight away from your body. For a right turn, extend your left arm and bend your elbow at a 90-degree angle pointing up. To indicate that you are stopping or slowing down, extend your left arm with your elbow bent pointing down. This way, drivers will know when you are turning, moving, or stopping.[18]
Hand signals are made with the left arm because the right hand controls the back brake. This is the more important brake for cyclists, since the front brake should never be pulled on its own.
If you are absolutely certain that you won’t need to brake, feel free to indicate right turns by extending your right arm out.[Edit]Staying Motivated to Ride Regularly
Begin with a smaller goal of biking per ride. If you start out with a massive goal of biking a week, you’ll struggle to reach your goal. Start out with a small, achievable with a goal of per ride. You can always work your way up to longer rides over time. Starting small will ensure that you aren’t discouraged by not reaching your objective. It will also prevent injuries from the impact of long rides before your body is ready for it.[19]
If you’re really new to biking, you can start even smaller. Choose a quiet, 4-5 block route with little-to-no traffic. Practice riding that route perfectly before moving up to a longer, more difficult ride.
Track your distance during each session using a cycling app.
Bike 2-4 times a week to give your body time to heal between rides. After your first ride, you’re probably going to be quite sore. Overworking your body is a surefire way to discourage yourself from biking. Take days off between rides so that you’re biking 2-4 times a week based on your level of comfort.[20]
If you’re starting to bike so that you can get to work or school every day, start out by biking 2-3 times a week. Drive or take public transportation on the days that you’re taking off. Work up to a full week over time.
Make a habit of biking by tracking how often you ride. It’s hard to start a new habit if you don’t have accountability. In a journal, write down how often you ride each day. Note the distance that you biked as well. Review your results at the end of the week to determine whether or not you’ve reached your goal. By tracking how often you actually bike, you’ll know for sure whether you’re getting in the swing of regularly biking.[21]
It will become easier to reach your goal over time as you get used to cycling and tracking your progress.
Avoid routes that include hills or rough terrain until you’re ready. To ensure that you don’t harm yourself, stick with flat, simple routes to start off. Minimize the number of turns that you need to take and stay away from hills or rocky roads. It takes skill to navigate difficult routes; until you have some experience, you’re better off playing it safe.[22]
Staying on flat roads with few obstructions allows you to get comfortable with the act of pedaling without needing to pay attention to your terrain.
Find a biking group that takes scheduled rides together. If you find it hard to get in the habit of biking regularly, look into joining a cycling group. Cycling groups are a set of people that ride together on scheduled trips, and having a set of people to bike with will keep you motivated. Go to your local bike shop and ask around for a group to ride with. You can also search online for a beginner-level bike group that’s open to new members.[23][Edit]Tips
Don’t be too hard on yourself. It takes time to get in the habit of cycling regularly! It’s natural to need a break every once in a while.[Edit]Warnings
If you live in a major city, stay away from congested areas unless they have dedicated bike lanes.
Always wear bright or reflective clothing before you go out riding at night.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Getting the Appropriate Gear
Helmet
Cycling shorts (optional)
Cycling jersey (optional)
Athletic shoes
Air pump
App for tracking distance[Edit]References↑ https://www.sportsrec.com/275683-racing-bikes-vs-mountain-bikes.html

↑ https://www.sportsrec.com/275683-racing-bikes-vs-mountain-bikes.html

↑ https://www.icebike.org/10-reasons-why-a-foldable-bike-is-the-best-commuter-bike/

↑ https://www.icebike.org/used-road-bike/

↑ https://www.icebike.org/used-road-bike/

↑ https://www.icebike.org/used-road-bike/

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20027599/how-to-start-cycling/#

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20027599/how-to-start-cycling/#

↑ https://eng.taiwan.net.tw/att/files/Guide%20to%20Cycling%20Around%20Taiwan.pdf

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20027599/how-to-start-cycling/#

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20027599/how-to-start-cycling/#

↑ https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/apps/reviews/a10859/4-best-bike-apps-16947157/

↑ https://www.realbuzz.com/articles-interests/cycling/article/the-correct-riding-position-on-a-road-bike/

↑ https://www.realbuzz.com/articles-interests/cycling/article/the-correct-riding-position-on-a-road-bike/

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/g20046639/the-beginners-blueprint-to-road-cycling-greatness/

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/g20046639/the-beginners-blueprint-to-road-cycling-greatness/

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/g20046639/the-beginners-blueprint-to-road-cycling-greatness/

↑ https://www.nhtsa.gov/sites/nhtsa.dot.gov/files/8009-handsignals.pdf

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/g20046639/the-beginners-blueprint-to-road-cycling-greatness/

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20027599/how-to-start-cycling/#

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20027599/how-to-start-cycling/#

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/g20046639/the-beginners-blueprint-to-road-cycling-greatness/

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/training/a20027599/how-to-start-cycling/#

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Today in History for 10th January 2020

Historical Events

1920 – Silver reaches record $1.37 an ounce
1928 – Soviet Union orders exile of Leon Trotsky
1932 – “Mickey Mouse” and “Silly Symphony” comics syndicated
1964 – “Introducing the Beatles” released 1st Beatles album released in the US
1973 – For the first time graduates studying from home with ‘the Open University’ receive their degrees
1996 – Israel frees hundreds of Palestinian prisoners

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1916 – Bob Hamilton, American golfer (PGA C’ship 1944), born in Evansville, Indiana (d. 1990)
1916 – Sune Bergström, Swedish biochemist and Nobel laureate, born in Stockholm, Sweden (d. 2004)
1937 – Thomas Penfield Jackson, American judge, born in Washington, D.C. (d. 2013)
1955 – Luci Martin, American vocalist (Chic), born in the Bronx, New York
1956 – Antonio Muñoz Molina, Spanish writer (Royal Spanish Academy), born in Úbeda, Jaén, Spain
1974 – Jemaine Clement, New Zealand actor and musician (Flight of the Conchords), born in Masterton, New Zealand

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1542 – Gerardus Noviomagus, [Gerrit Geldenhauer], Dutch theologist, die at 59
1698 – Louis-Sébastien Le Nain de Tillemont, French ecclesiastical historian, dies at 60
1883 – Dr Samuel A. Mudd, American medical doctor (b. 1833)
1997 – Alvinio Misciano, Italian tenor, killed in a fall from a window
2000 – Sam Jaffe, American music and film producer (Born Free, The Fighting Sullivans), dies at 98
2017 – Tony Rosato, Italian-born Canadian comedian (SCTV, Saturday Night Live), dies at 63

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How to Do a Frontside 360 on a Snowboard

If you enjoy snowboarding, then you likely want to learn some tricks and jumps! A frontside 360 is when you leave the slope and rotate in the air 360 degrees before hitting the ground again. The “frontside” part of the jump refers to the fact that you turn your chest toward the bottom of the slope first rather than your back. If you snowboard with your left side in front, then you turn counterclockwise; if you snowboard in the “goofy” position with your right side to the front, you turn clockwise. To land the jump, pop off the heel edge of your board into the air and use your arms, head, and torso to gain the momentum you need to rotate in the air. This jump can be difficult to master, so you may want to start with basic jumps, then 180s and 270s.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Landing the Frontside 360 on a Simple Slope
Gather some speed to land the jump properly. This jump is actually easier to do if you’re going a bit faster. That’s because the speed gives you more air time, meaning you have longer to make the turn. Don’t try to do this going very slowly.[1]
However, don’t go fast that you feel out of control!
Tip on your heel edge as you go down the slope. This prepares you to start turning back up the hill. Place your weight on your heels rather than the balls of your feet and tilt the board toward your heels, called the “heel edge” of the board.[2]
It’s important to use the edge of the board when doing a jump because it gives you something to push off of in the snow. It digs in, providing leverage.[3]
Twist your arms towards the back of the board. Turn your upper body toward your back leg and move your arms around that direction. This movement is a way to “wind up” your body for the spin.[4]
So if your left side is facing front, twist your arms back to the right.
Bend at the knees as you come into the turn. Bending down will help you get ready to make the jump into the air. You can also lean your torso over a bit. Basically, you’re just getting ready to spring up as your board movement and arms propel you into the rotation.[5]
You don’t need to crouch down too low. Just bend enough to make the jump.
Turn back up the hill and swing your arms around. With the leg in front, begin turning the board to your backside, like you’re about to go back up the hill. At the same time or just before, swing your arms around in the direction you want to go, which will help begin your rotation.[6]
So if your left side is in front, you’ll turn back to the left.
This is called a “frontside” 360 because you’re turning the front of your body toward the downhill side of the slope first, rather than the back of your body. A backside would be if you had your left side in front and turned to the right first because you’d be flipping your back to the downhill side of the slope first.
Pop up into the air as you make the turn. Use your legs to propel you upward just as you begin the rotation. Spring into the air, extending your body and locking your core as your torso lines up with the board below.[7] Try to jump as high as you can so you don’t come down too quickly.[8]
Keep in mind, the slope will help you with your lift. As you pop off the edge of the board, you’ll keep going straight out for a second while the ground slopes down.
Continue looking over your shoulder through the whole move. As you start the rotation, look over your leading shoulder. This movement will also help get the rotation going, but you must keep doing it through the whole turn. Otherwise, you might not make it all the way around.[9]
You want to lead with your head and shoulders the whole time.
Land on your toe edge. As you come around the rotation, you’ll have a blind landing. Tip the board forward and extend your legs down to catch the ground. Bend your knees to absorb some of the impact as you hit the ground.[10]
If you’ve jumped high enough and used enough rotating force, you should be going down the slope when you land again.
[Edit]Working on Problem Areas
Practice popping off the ground on the trampoline. One part of the move is lifting your snowboard off the ground so you have enough space to rotate in the air. If you’re having trouble getting enough lift, take your snowboard on a trampoline. Work on jumping off the trampoline on your snowboard, and it will help you get a feel for the motion.[11]
Work on a large trampoline to make sure you have enough space, like the kind you see in tumbling gyms or trampoline parks.
You can also practice this move on flat ground in the snow. Bend your knees and use that motion to push yourself off the ground. Lift your knees under you to give yourself more air.
Use the trampoline to work on the twisting motion. With your snowboard on, start bouncing, gaining some air. As you come down on a jump, twist your arms around your body to the right. When you hit the trampoline, start moving your arms and your shoulders around to the left, which will help your whole body turn.[12]
Work on the trampoline until you can go all the way around.
Try flatland frontside 360s to help you understand the movement. That is, instead of popping off the ground as you go into your rotation, simply spin around on the ground as you go down the slope. To make the spin, come in with your knees bent like you would for one in the air, but then extend your legs and straighten up your body for the rotation. On the way out of the rotation, bend your knees and torso back down slightly. That will help you get the feel for how you need to rotate once you get in the air.[13]
Once this rotation is smooth, you can try it in the air again.
Don’t forget the rotation movements with your arms and upper body! You won’t turn if you don’t start the rotation.
Avoid rotating too early if you’re not spinning all the way around. If you start rotating too much before you get off the ground, the friction of the board will slow your turn down. To make sure you get all the way around, try to time the rotation at about the same time as you lift off the ground.[14]
Keep the board level to not land on your butt. If you pop up and you’re not level, you typically end up sliding into the ground as you finish the rotation. Try to tilt just a little bit forward with your torso as you go into the rotation and keep the board even with the horizon as it leaves the ground.[15]
Keep from over-rotating by waiting to spot the landing. This jump includes a blind landing. If you’re trying to see it before the end of the rotation, you could spin too fast, resulting in a crash. Instead, keep your eyes in the direction of the toe edge of the board. Then you can see the landing point on the slope as you come around the rotation.[16][Edit]Making Your 360 More Impressive
Do the move off a jump on the course. You definitely want to practice straight jumps first before trying a 360. However, once you get the hang of regular jumps, try adding the rotation. Aim to start your rotation right as you hit the takeoff of the jump, twisting your arms and board around to get your momentum going. Extend your legs at the takeoff to get the “pop” effect.[17]
Start with smaller course jumps and work your way up to bigger ones.
Practice grabs on a trampoline with your snowboard. A grab is where you hold on to the edge of the board while you’re in the air. Get on a trampoline with your snowboard on. Gain some air by jumping a few times, then work on bringing your board up for a front grab. Lift the toe edge of the board and grab it with your hand. Release it quickly and land on the bottom of the snowboard.[18]
You can also lean back and grab the heel edge of the board or tip the leading edge of the board up (usually your left side) and grab it with your left hand, which is a nose grab. Try the back end for a tail grab.
You can use either end to grab the toe side or heel side of the board, but it will take different movements.
Try combining this with the 360 rotation on the trampoline.
Lift your knees in your frontside rotations to work on adding a grab. To start adding a grab on the slopes, work on lifting your knees while you are rotating. Tighten your body up so that you’re almost in the fetal position.[19]
This movement brings the board closer to your hands, making it easier to perform a grab.
To help make yourself compact, use a lot of force when you pop off the takeoff point of the jump. The hard pop will push your legs up toward your chest.
Incorporate a grab on the slopes. After you get the feel for the movement, try it out while you make a rotation. Try starting with a straightforward jump, then try it with a 180 or a 270 before moving on to the 360. That way, you get a feel for it while lowering your chances of wiping out on the jump.[20][Edit]Tips
Watch others hit the feature on the course to gauge the speed you need to clear the landing.
A common mistake is to start spinning while still on the feature, which causes you to lose stability in the air. Make sure that you take off of the lip straight.[Edit]Warnings
Don’t try this trick before you learn the basics. You can get seriously hurt on some of those big jumps, so take it easy if you’re new to the sport.
Make sure to wear the proper safety gear, including headgear, to help lower the risk of injury.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Ice Skate
Get On a Ski Lift with a Snowboard
Get Off a Ski Lift with a Snowboard
Perform a Carve on a Snowboard
Snowboard[Edit]References↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1ENzzd7RsY&feature=youtu.be&t=20

↑ https://medium.com/@maverixsnow/the-keys-to-landing-frontside-360s-on-a-snowboard-96760480f3bc

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUddT6FGCws&feature=youtu.be&t=77

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sh3qT1INT_I&feature=youtu.be&t=40

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sh3qT1INT_I&feature=youtu.be&t=60

↑ https://medium.com/@maverixsnow/the-keys-to-landing-frontside-360s-on-a-snowboard-96760480f3bc

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1ENzzd7RsY&feature=youtu.be&t=105

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sh3qT1INT_I&feature=youtu.be&t=63

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1ENzzd7RsY&feature=youtu.be&t=64

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1ENzzd7RsY&feature=youtu.be&t=82

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUddT6FGCws&feature=youtu.be&t=29

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUddT6FGCws&feature=youtu.be&t=38

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1ENzzd7RsY&feature=youtu.be&t=93

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sh3qT1INT_I&feature=youtu.be&t=105

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sh3qT1INT_I&feature=youtu.be&t=113

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1ENzzd7RsY&feature=youtu.be&t=71

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q1ENzzd7RsY&feature=youtu.be&t=24

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0JD6fLyAa0&feature=youtu.be&t=59

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0JD6fLyAa0&feature=youtu.be&t=40

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0JD6fLyAa0&feature=youtu.be&t=92

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