How to Start Riding an ATV

Riding an all-terrain vehicle, or ATV, can be a fun and exciting way to explore the great outdoors. But, ATVs are powerful machines, and you need to know how to safely and properly ride one before you start blazing down an offroad trail. Be sure to have the proper safety equipment, choose an appropriate ATV to ride, and don’t try any tricks when you’re starting out. While you’re learning to ride, choose a wide-open space so you can practice picking up speed, shifting gears, and taking turns properly. For the best preparation, take a formal ATV riding course.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Riding an ATV Safely
Choose an appropriate ATV for you to start riding. A sports quad is a good starter ATV for an adult who can reach the handlebars and gear shift in the footrest. A youth ATV is more appropriate for a younger person getting started because they’re lighter and shorter. You could also choose a utility ATV if you plan to use it for work purposes and you need to learn how to ride it.[1]
Try sitting on an ATV to make sure it feels comfortable and you can reach all of the handles and gears.
Using an ATV that is too large, powerful, or unwieldy for you could result in an accident.
Wear protective gear when you ride. ATVs are powerful machines and can cause you serious injury if you’re in an accident. To better protect yourself, wear proper equipment. Before you ride, put on a pair of boots, gloves, safety goggles, and a helmet.[2]
Wearing protective gear will reduce your chances of getting injured, especially if you’re new to riding.
Make sure the helmet and gear fit properly and allow you to see properly.
You can find ATV protective gear at ATV supply shops, at sports and outdoor stores, and online.
Use nerf bars when you’re learning to ride. Nerf bars are large foot pegs that fit onto your ATV to widen the footing area, which make it easier for you to keep your footing, especially when you’re starting out. When you choose your ATV, go with one that has nerf bars or have them installed so you can learn to ride more safely.[3]
You can find nerf bars at sports and outdoors stores, at ATV supply stores, and online.
Nerf bars also make it easier for you to learn how to turn, use the clutch, and shift gears.
Keep both feet on the foot pegs at all times. Your feet need to always be placed in the footing area of the ATV to ensure your safety. The footing area is where the clutch and the gear shift is located, so it’s important that you’re ready to shift gears if necessary. You could also get your foot or leg snagged on something when you’re riding if any part of your body is hanging out of the ATV.[4]
Hanging a leg outside of your ATV can also shift your weight off-balance, which can cause the ATV to tip or you to fall off.
Avoid riding on paved roads to avoid getting hit by a vehicle. ATVs are meant to be ridden offroad, so driving them on a paved street or highway is actually bad for their tires. You could also accidentally be hit by a passing vehicle. Only ride on paved roads when you’re crossing them to get to the other side.[5]
It’s also against the law in many places to drive an ATV on a paved road.
Don’t attempt any wheelies when you start riding an ATV. A wheelie involves leaning your weight back to lift the front wheels off of the ground, and they can easily result in the ATV flipping over onto you. When you’re starting to ride, don’t be tempted to try a trick that can result in serious injury.[6][Edit]Learning How to Ride
Check your local laws regarding ATVs before you ride. Some locations may have designated areas for you to legally drive your ATV. You may also need to have a special license and proof of insurance in order to ride an ATV. Look online for your area’s rules and regulations about ATV riding.[7]
Check your local government’s website for a list of rules regarding ATVs.
Ride in an open area without any obstacles when you’re getting started. Choose a large, flat, open space that’s free of any hazards or obstacles that you could run into to practice riding your ATV. The controls will take some getting used to, so avoid steep terrain or an area that has a lot of vehicles or objects that you would need to navigate around.[8]
An empty field or a large backyard would work as a suitable practice area.
Turn the key and press the start button to start the ATV. Put the key into the ignition and turn it to the start position. Then, press the start button, which is usually located on the right side of the handlebars. When the engine starts, allow it to run for about a minute so it can warm up.[9]
If you’re riding in cold weather conditions, allow the engine to run for 5 minutes so it can heat up before you ride.
Pull the clutch handle to place the engine into neutral. On the left handlebar is a lever called the clutch. Pulling the clutch puts the engine into the neutral gear, which allows you to shift gears as you build up speed. To start moving, engage the clutch with your left hand so you can put the engine into gear.[10]
While you’re in the neutral gear, your ATV can continue to roll forward, but you will not be able to add any speed.
You need to place the engine into first gear in order to start moving.
Use your left foot to raise the gear shift lever to shift into higher gears. With the clutch engaged, use your left foot to shift gears by lifting the lever located in the left footrest. Then, release the clutch to place the engine into gear so you can keep moving. As you build up speed, shift into higher gears.[11]
Practice riding around, then slowly increase your speed, and work to shift into higher gears to get used to riding.
Downshift into lower gears as you slow down your ATV. When you’re decreasing your speed, you also need to shift back into lower gears. Hold the clutch with your left hand and press down on the gear shift lever with your left foot, then release the clutch. You’ll feel the lever click down as you downshift.[12]
Shift into lower gears one at a time to allow your engine to adjust to the lower speeds and gears.
Start braking with your right hand and gradually add your left hand. The brakes of an ATV are controlled by levers to the right and left of the handlebars. The lever to the right controls the rear brakes, while the lever to the left controls the front brakes. Always start braking the rear wheels first by squeezing the right handle, and add additional braking power by slowly squeezing the left handle.[13]
If you squeeze both brakes at the same time, you may tumble forward over the handlebars.
Squeezing the left handle to brake the front wheels only can cause the ATV to flip over.
Lean into turns to keep the ATV from tipping. Shift your weight in the direction that you’re turning to distribute the weight and keep your ATV from tipping over. If you’re turning left, lean to the left side of the ATV. If you’re turning right, lean right. Work to get used to distributing your weight so you can take turns at higher speeds.[14]
It can help to stand up from the seat so you can lean further if you’re taking a harder turn.
Take an ATV riding course to receive formal training. The best way to make sure you’re properly equipped to start riding your ATV is to take a course from an experienced rider who can show you the ins and outs of your ATV. Look online for classes in your area that you can sign up for to receive formal instruction.[15]
Ask your ATV dealer if they provide instruction or can recommend a course.
You may be required to take a certification course in order to be legally allowed to ride your ATV.[Edit]Warnings
Always wear protective gear when you’re riding an ATV![Edit]Related wikiHows
Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV
Be Safe on an All Terrain Vehicle[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://atvfreedom.com/beginners-guide/

↑ https://atvfreedom.com/beginners-guide/

↑ https://mentalitch.com/riding-an-atv-is-easy-6-tips-for-any-beginner/

↑ https://atvsafety.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/ASI-ATV-Tips-Guide-2018.pdf

↑ https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/atv-safety.html

↑ https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/atv-safety.html

↑ https://atvfreedom.com/beginners-guide/

↑ https://atvsafety.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/ASI-ATV-Tips-Guide-2018.pdf

↑ https://atvfreedom.com/beginners-guide/

↑ http://offroadfreedom.com/how-to-drive-a-manual-atv/

↑ http://offroadfreedom.com/how-to-drive-a-manual-atv/

↑ http://offroadfreedom.com/how-to-drive-a-manual-atv/

↑ https://atvsafety.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/ASI-ATV-Tips-Guide-2018.pdf

↑ https://atvsafety.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/ASI-ATV-Tips-Guide-2018.pdf

↑ https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/atv-safety.html

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Today in History for 12th January 2020

Historical Events

1806 – French evacuate Vienna
1820 – Astronomical Society of London (now the Royal Astronomical Society) founded in England
1899 – Lynmouth Lifeboat rescues 18 people from the stricken schooner Forest Hall off the coast of Devon
1908 – A long-distance radio message is sent from the Eiffel Tower for the first time.
2001 – Downtown Disney opens to the public in Anaheim
2006 – During an emotional ceremony, Mark Messier’s #11 jersey is retired by the New York Rangers

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1591 – José Ribera/Jusepe de Ribera, Spanish painter and printmaker, nicknamed Lo Spagnoletto (d. 1652)
1821 – Nikolai Afanisev, composer
1910 – Patsy Kelly, American actress (Rosemary’s Baby, North Ave Irregulars), born in Brooklyn, New York (d. 1981)
1920 – Prof Jerzy Zubrzycki, Polish-born Australian sociologist, born in Kraków, Poland (d. 2009)
1972 – Dominique Ross, American NFL running back (Dallas Cowboys), born in Jacksonville, Florida
1987 – Naya Rivera, American actress (Glee), born in Santa Clarita, California

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

689 – Benedict Biscop, English saint, dies
1962 – Richard de Guide, composer, dies at 52
1962 – Ariadna Tyrkova-Williams, Russian writer and feminist, dies at 92
1992 – Walt Morey, US children’s book writer (Gentle Ben), dies at 84
1999 – Doug Wickenheiser, Canadian ice hockey player (b. 1961)
1999 – Betty Lou Gerson, American voice actress (101 Dalmatians, Cinderella), dies of a stroke at 84

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Become a Fitness Coach

A fitness coach helps someone achieve their fitness goals by teaching them exercises and wellness strategies. If you’re hoping to become a fitness coach, the first step is narrowing down your focus to one type of fitness. Look for a certification program that you can take to prepare you for the certification exam. Once you’ve finished the program, take the exam to obtain your certification, letting you start training clients. Either start applying to fitness jobs you’re interested in, or market yourself as a personal fitness coach to gain clients and start your fitness coaching career.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Becoming Certified
Decide what your fitness focus will be. Choose whether you’ll be a group fitness instructor, teaching things like cycling, step aerobics, or boxing, or if you’ll be a personal trainer who only works with individual clients. Decide if you want to work in a class setting, work one-on-one, or even do both, as well as picking a specific type of fitness.[1]
Most professional fitness certifications, like ACE or NASM, offer certifications for many different specific types of fitness.
For example, a group fitness instructor might take the ACE Group Fitness Instructor Exam, while a personal trainer could get their certification through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) with a weight loss specialization.
If you’re a group fitness teacher, you’ll choreograph movements for your own classes.
A fitness coach who only works with individual people at once will need knowledge about how to create a fitness plan based on one person’s fitness goals, meaning knowledge about various types of fitness goals is desired.
Research online programs that offer the training you need. Certification programs are online courses that offer the content you’ll need. Once you’ve chosen your desired fitness type, search for certification programs online that will teach you everything you need to know to pass your specific certification. Popular options include the American Council on Exercise (ACE), International Sports Sciences Association (ISSA), or the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). Each of these will let you choose the specific type of specialization you’d like.[2]
Explore what different certification courses offer online so that you can choose the best one for your needs.
Programs are also offered by the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).
Enroll in your chosen program and pay all the required fees. Many programs have options for how much or how little you’d like to purchase. For example, you might have access to live workshops, coaches and mentors, or an accelerated program if you pay a higher price. Besides paying for the actual program, you’ll likely need to pay for the exam and learning materials (such as textbooks) as well.[3]
The prices for each organization range widely, with programs costing anywhere from $450-$1,200 or more. Some programs include the cost of the exam in their program total, so check before submitting your payment to see if it’s included.
Many programs offer deals giving you a certain percentage off if you sign up quickly.
Complete the coursework to learn the certification requirements. Most programs are online and will offer a digital or physical textbook, video lectures, and practice exams. Take your time as you’re going through the coursework, studying the information thoroughly to be sure you remember it all. Check out what kind of extra study guides or learning activities your program offers.[4]
While participating in the program, you’ll learn about nutrition, exercise techniques, anatomy, and other topics related to your specific certification.
These programs are usually self-paced, meaning you can take as long or as a short of a time studying the coursework as needed.
A few programs may require that you finish the coursework in a certain amount of time, such as three months.
Take the certification exam after studying all of the important elements. The exam will contain a written test, and many exams also contain a practical section that tests your understanding of proper exercise techniques. Study the program material thoroughly before taking the test so you’re sure to pass it.[5]
Many certification programs offer study materials such as practice tests and workshops to help you get ready.
The exam will also test your ability to create exercise programs for different clients’ needs, as well as how to assess someone’s fitness level.
Get CPR training, as many jobs or certification agencies require it. Whether your certification requires it or not, CPR is a very useful skill to have as a fitness coach because it ensures you can help a client out if they ever need medical assistance. Find a local CPR class near you and sign up to learn the proper training.[6]
Find a class by typing “CPR classes near me” into an online search engine.
Earn a degree in a health- or fitness-related field, if applicable. Some employers may require you to have a bachelor’s degree, or even a master’s degree, in a subject such as kinesiology, physical education, or exercise science. If you have the resources and desire to further your education, consider enrolling in a college that offers a fitness-related subject you’d like to study, taking classes in person or online.[7]
Do an online search to find colleges and universities that offer degrees related to fitness and wellness.[Edit]Finding Clients or a Job
Apply to jobs at places like boutique fitness companies and gyms. These sorts of places are almost always looking for new people to teach clients. Send in your resume or apply to open jobs at recreation centers, health clubs, dance studios, or other fitness associations.[8]
Have a resume that reflects your skills, education, and certification related to the job you’re applying for.
Build your own client base if you want to be self-employed. If you’d rather be in charge of your own schedule and work with clients one-on-one, create a brand for yourself. Decide what you’ll offer clients in the way of exercise and health coaching, gather any equipment you’ll need for the training, and put your information on social media and online for people to find.[9]
Consider creating your own website or social media page to promote your business.
Offer to meet clients at a gym that you’re a member of, or outdoors if the weather is nice.
The gear you’ll need to work with clients will depend on your specialized fitness instruction. For example, a personal fitness trainer might need access to things like weights and resistance bands while a yoga instructor needs yoga mats or yoga blocks.
Bring one set of equipment to share with your client, or suggest that your client purchase their own equipment to keep with them.
Spread the word that you’re a certified fitness coach using social media and videos. Make videos of clips of your workout routines so people get an idea of what it’s like to train with you. Create Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn pages so that more and more people will be able to find your services.[10]
Reach out to people locally by attending fitness meetups or workout events.
Consider being an online-only fitness coach who creates videos for a wide audience to reference.
Team up with another certified fitness coach to help you gain experience. This is a great way to learn the ins and outs of being a fitness coach in a more hands-on way. Ask a fitness coach that you know if you could teach a client or class alongside them. Pay attention to how they interact and instruct their clients to learn from their methods.[11]
This is especially helpful if you’re nervous about coaching clients by yourself for the first time.[Edit]Honing Necessary Skills
Continue learning about staying healthy, both through food and exercise. To be a successful fitness coach, learn as much about health and wellness as possible, including nutrition, how to control your weight, and healthy lifestyle practices. Use this knowledge to help your clients reach their fitness and health goals.[12]
Knowing as much as possible about health and fitness will show that you’re passionate about the subject.
Read health and fitness books, attend conferences and classes, watch videos, and participate in other fitness classes to help you learn new things.
Stay energetic and encouraging to practice your motivational skills. A great fitness coach can motivate people to keep going even when they don’t want to. Practice this skill by doing things like staying positive when you’re teaching, using an encouraging voice, and exuding energy that’s contagious.[13]
Watch other fitness trainers in action to see how they give off energy while motivating others.
You might say things like, “You’re doing great! See if you can push yourself a little bit further!”
Practice demonstrating and explaining different exercise techniques. This is the best way your clients will learn from you. Spend time pretending that you’re teaching someone different exercises, going slowly and making sure to explain the proper form with your words as well as with your body.[14]
Practice explaining any safety rules that go along with an exercise, or how to tell when you’re doing an exercise right.
Learn how to make modifications to your exercise routine or class. Sometimes a client or class participant won’t be able to do exactly what you’ve planned for the routine due to a physical limitation or other factor. Always have modifications planned for each exercise so that everyone is able to participate in some kind of way.[15]
You might have different variations of an exercise depending on the person’s skill level.
For example, you might show them how to do a regular pushup with both legs extended, with the modified version being a pushup on their knees.[Edit]Tips
Keep your certification (your fitness training certification as well as your CPR certification) up to date by renewing it before it expires, often every 1-2 years.
Look up requirements regarding your state’s fitness certification standards.
Some employers may require you to have a bachelor’s degree in a fitness-related subject such as kinesiology, physical education, or exercise science.
Consider hiring your own fitness coach to learn from their techniques and examples.[Edit]References↑ https://medium.com/@kylehuntfitness/7-ways-to-stand-out-as-an-online-fitness-coach-in-a-crowded-market-d636ccc3ed26

↑ https://www.exercise-science-guide.com/certifications/personal-training/

↑ https://www.exercise-science-guide.com/certifications/personal-training/

↑ https://www.exercise-science-guide.com/certifications/personal-training/

↑ https://www.academicinvest.com/science-careers/exercise-science-careers/how-to-become-a-fitness-coach

↑ https://www.zippia.com/fitness-coach-jobs/

↑ https://www.academicinvest.com/science-careers/exercise-science-careers/how-to-become-a-fitness-coach

↑ https://www.academicinvest.com/science-careers/exercise-science-careers/how-to-become-a-fitness-coach

↑ https://www.academicinvest.com/science-careers/exercise-science-careers/how-to-become-a-fitness-coach

↑ https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2017/06/23/eight-proven-fitness-marketing-strategies-that-get-trainers-more-clients/#2a9917c139e0

↑ https://www.zippia.com/fitness-coach-jobs/

↑ https://www.academicinvest.com/science-careers/exercise-science-careers/how-to-become-a-fitness-coach

↑ https://www.shape.com/fitness/workouts/6-things-consider-becoming-fitness-pro

↑ https://www.zippia.com/fitness-coach-jobs/

↑ https://www.zippia.com/fitness-coach-jobs/

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