How to Keep Outside Pipes from Freezing

Preventing exterior pipes from freezing isn’t hard to do, but it is important. A frozen pipe may burst, which can lead to expensive and time-consuming repairs. To keep exterior pipes from freezing, protect them with polyethylene pipe insulation and duct tape. In your home, turn the heat on until the weather warms up and keep your cabinet doors open underneath your sink. Leave your sinks on so that a thin trickle of water comes out and keeps the pipes from freezing. In the event that a pipe does freeze, you can use a hair dryer or heating pad to warm the pipe up and clear the ice.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Insulating Your Pipes
Survey your exterior pipes to determine which pipes to insulate. Grab a pen, paper, and a measuring tape, and take a walk around your home. Identify any pipes that you want to cover. Measure the length of each exposed pipe that you want to insulate and write it down. For each pipe, note the diameter next to the length.[1]
If your house is on risers, get a disposable crawl suit and a flashlight to crawl into your crawlspace and look at your pipes.
You can tell if a pipe has water in it by putting your ear up to it and listening carefully. You should be able to hear water rushing through it. You can also tap it with a screwdriver. If the sound is hollow, it probably doesn’t have water inside.
You don’t really need to insulate pipes that contain wires, but you can if you’d like. Pipes that contain wires are typically silver and made of metal. Copper, PVC, or cast iron pipes are more likely to carry water.
Purchase polyethylene insulation for your pipes. Take your list of measurements to your local construction or home repair store. Buy enough pipe insulation to cover all of your pipes by matching the inside diameter of the insulation to the outside diameter of your pipes. The length and interior diameter of a piece of insulation is listed on the packaging, so read the label carefully before buying your insulation.[2]
For example, if you have 2 pipes with identical diameters that measure and , you need at least of insulation. It’s always a good idea to have some extra insulation on hand, though!
Polyethylene looks like a black foam and is the most commonly-used material to insulate exterior pipes. Fiberglass sleeves are typically used to insulate interior pipes. If you’re using fiberglass sleeves, wear a dust mask, gloves, and protective eyewear.
Pipe insulation is precut so that it can wrap around the pipe easily. You can cut it to length with scissors if needed.
Wrap insulation around each of your exposed pipes by hand. To wrap insulation around a pipe, find the vertical seam where the insulation is cut. Dig your fingers into this seam and gently pull the insulation open. Press the inside of the insulation around the pipe and let go of both sides to attach the insulation to the pipe. Repeat this process for each pipe that you’re insulating.[3]
Put on a pair of gloves before doing this to avoid burning your hands on hot water pipes.
Secure the insulation with duct tape or cable ties. To keep your insulation from sliding off of your pipes, use duct tape or cable ties. Wrap duct tape around the base of the insulation 4-5 times and pull it tight to keep the insulation in place. Attach cable ties by wrapping the plastic tie around the pipe and threading one end of the tie through the opening on the other end. Secure the tie by pulling firmly on the length that slides through the opening. Work your way up and wrap duct tape or place a cable tie once every . Repeat this process for every pipe.[4]
Don’t pull so hard on your pipe that you end up ripping it out or cracking it. So long as the ties or tape keep the insulation from sliding around, you’re fine.[Edit]Using Water and Air to Prevent Freezing
Turn the heat on inside your home and leave it at a steady temperature. Keeping your home heated will ensure that the walls stay warm. If the walls are warm, the pipes leading inside will have a harder time freezing. Turn the heat on to a temperature higher than . Leave the heat where it is and don’t turn it down or off when you leave or go to bed.[5]
You don’t need to set the thermostat to its highest setting to keep your home warm. So long as the air in your home is or hotter, your pipes will be less likely to freeze.
Use a space heater or free-standing radiator to heat rooms that have poor circulation. Don’t leave a space heater on when you aren’t home or go to sleep, though.
Open the cabinets under your sink to improve air flow. Hot air has trouble making its way into your cabinets where your exterior pipes lead inside. To prevent exterior pipes from freezing, improve the air flow where the pipes enter into your home. Go to every sink in your home and open the cabinet doors. Leave them completely open to allow the hot air in your home to make its way under the sink.[6]
Keeping your interior pipes warm will prevent the exterior pipes from freezing up.
If you have a garage, keep the door closed. Many garages have water lines running underneath or alongside them.
Let water drip from each of your faucets to keep water flowing. Your pipes can’t freeze up if the water is constantly moving. To keep water moving through your pipes, turn the handle on each of your sinks and tub to leave a trickle of cold water running at all times.[7]
This will increase the price of your water bill, but it’s worth it to avoid spending thousands of dollars on a burst pipe that leads to water damage.[Edit]Thawing a Frozen Pipe
Turn the water on to apply pressure to your pipe. If a pipe freezes, turn on the water at each sink and tub in your home. If water starts building up or no water comes out, your pipe is fully blocked. Turn your frozen faucet off to avoid overflowing your sink or tub. Leave the other lines running while you deal with the blocked pipe by heating it directly.[8]
Don’t worry if the water backs up. It’ll go down as soon as you heat the pipe directly and the pressure from the water will make this process easier.
It’s usually pretty easy to find a frozen pipe. Simply go to the wall outside of the sink or drain where you’re experiencing problems. You’ll find the pipe leading out of the wall or base of your home.
The supply line is frozen if no water comes out. The drain line is frozen if water won’t go down.
Use a heating pad or hair dryer to heat a frozen pipe directly. To thaw a pipe out, take a portable heating pad or hair dryer out to the pipe. Turn the heating pad to its highest setting and wrap it around the frozen section. If you’re using a hair dryer, turn it on to the highest setting and run it over the frozen length. After heating the pipe for 10-15 minutes, check your sink to see if the water has gone down or come back on. If it hasn’t, repeat this process until the pipe is fully thawed.[9]
If you don’t have a portable pad or hair dryer, find an outlet outside and use an extension cord to reach your pipe.
You can also soak a towel in hot water and layer it around the pipe. This may work, but the towel will freeze if you leave it on for too long.
Call a licensed plumber if you cannot clear the blockage or find the pipe. If you cannot clear the blockage after 30-45 minutes of heating the pipe, there may be a blockage underground or in your wall. If you can’t find the pipe, you may need help identifying the source of the problem. Call a licensed plumber immediately to clear the blockage for you. The longer a pipe remain frozen, the more likely it is to burst.
A burst pipe can lead to costly repairs and permanent water damage that will require heavy renovations.[Edit]Tips
Pipes are more likely to freeze if it’s or colder.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Insulating Your Pipes
Measuring tape
Pen or pencil
Paper
Crawl suit (optional)
Flashlight (optional)
Pipe insulation
Scissors
Duct tape or cable ties[Edit]Thawing a Frozen Pipe
Hair dryer
Heating pad
Extension cord (optional)[Edit]References↑ https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/services/do-it-yourself-energy-savings-projects/savings-project-insulate-hot-water-pipes

↑ https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/services/do-it-yourself-energy-savings-projects/savings-project-insulate-hot-water-pipes

↑ https://todayshomeowner.com/video/how-to-insulate-water-pipes-to-prevent-freezing/

↑ https://www.energy.gov/energysaver/services/do-it-yourself-energy-savings-projects/savings-project-insulate-hot-water-pipes

↑ https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/winter-storm/frozen-pipes.html

↑ https://www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies/winter-storm/frozen-pipes.html

↑ https://www.consumerreports.org/home-maintenance-repairs/how-to-keep-pipes-from-freezing/

↑ https://www.consumerreports.org/home-maintenance-repairs/how-to-keep-pipes-from-freezing/

↑ https://www.consumerreports.org/home-maintenance-repairs/how-to-keep-pipes-from-freezing/

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Today in History for 14th January 2020

Historical Events

1911 – Roald Amundsen’s South Pole expedition lands on the Ross Ice Shelf
1924 – Allies direct Fiume (Rijeka) in Italy
1943 – World War II: Japan begins Operation Ke, withdrawal of its troops from Guadalcanal
1963 – George Wallace sworn in as Governor of Alabama, his address states “segregation now; segregation tomorrow; segregation forever!”
1971 – John Snow takes 7-40 for England to beat Australia by 299 runs
1974 – World Football League founded

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1798 – Isaac da Costa, Jewish poet, born in Amsterdam, Netherlands (d. 1860)
1804 – John Park, Scottish composer and minister, born in Greenock, Renfrewshire (d. 1865)
1806 – Sir Charles Hotham, Governor of Victoria, born in Dennington, United Kingdom (d. 1855)
1857 – Alice Pike Barney, American painter, born in Cincinnati, Ohio (d. 1931)
1963 – Steven Soderbergh, American producer, director, writer (Ocean’s Eleven, Traffic), born in Atlanta, Georgia
1994 – Samir Patel, American spelling bee winner

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1819 – John Wolcot, English satirist (Peter Pindar), dies at 80
1929 – Cornelis W Lely, Dutch Governor of Suriname (1902-05), dies at 74
1948 – Anna “Ans” van Dike, Dutch Jewish Nazi-collaborator, executed at 42
1977 – Peter Finch, actor (Network, The Nun’s Story, Judith), dies at 60
1978 – Harold Abrahams, British athlete (Olympic gold and silver 1924), dies at 78
1996 – Eric Briault, educationalist, dies at 84

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Keep Moisture in Your Skin

Keeping your skin moist and supple throughout the day can be challenging, especially in dry winter air. The key to getting beautifully hydrated skin that lasts all day is timing and layering your moisturizer correctly. Always apply moisturizers to damp skin and layer lighter treatments like oils and serums underneath your moisturizer. Weekly treatments like exfoliation and face masks can help get rid of dead skin and give you an extra glow.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Establishing a Skincare Routine
Use lukewarm water to wash up. Using hot water to shower or wash your face might feel nice, but it can dry out your skin, too. Hot water strips away the skin’s natural oils and will leave it more dry, no matter how much moisturizer you apply.[1]
If you can’t give up hot showers, try to switch to using lukewarm water for washing your face and hands.
Look for alcohol- and soap-free cleansers. Deodorant soaps, scents, and alcohol all have drying effects on the skin. Look for ingredients like glycerine, Niacinimide, and Vitamin B3, especially if you have sensitive skin.[2]
Foaming and scrubbing cleansers can also dry out the skin.
Use oils, serums, or medications before applying moisturizer. In order for your moisturizer to work the best, it should be the last thing you apply to your skin. If you use any oils, serums, or medications, such as acne creams, apply them directly after cleansing your skin.[3]
Apply products to your skin in order from the product with the lightest formula to the heaviest formula.
Apply moisturizer while your skin is still damp. Use an oil-based ointment or cream rather than a water-based lotion. Olive oil, jojoba oil, and shea butter are all natural ingredients that soothe and moisturize dry skin. Moisturizer of any kind won’t work unless your skin is already a little wet. Apply moisturizer after gently patting your body, face, or hands dry, while your skin still feels damp.[4]
The best kind of moisturizer is a cream that contains hyaluronic acid or ceramides. The thicker and greasier the formula feels, the more effectively it will seal in moisture.
Apply a hand cream after you wash your hands.
Massage products gently into the skin. Rubbing your skin too hard or too much can cause irritation. Rub the tips of your fingers in small circles to gently massage any products you are using into your skin.[5]
To minimize irritation even more, use a patting motion rather than a rubbing motion to dry your face and body.
Exfoliate once a week to get rid of dead skin and help moisturizers penetrate. Although exfoliating doesn’t actively moisturize, it can help the skin get rid of dead cells so that moisturizers work better. Exfoliate your hands, face, and all over your body, then follow the treatment immediately with a moisturizer. Use a gentle, unscented exfoliator, especially for the face.[6]
If you have sensitive skin, a washcloth and a gentle chemical exfoliator should be enough, rather than an exfoliator with beads.
Excessively exfoliating can leave your skin raw and won’t help lock moisturizer in any better.
Try a face mask once or twice a week. Look for a cream, gel, or sheet mask with ingredients like collagen and antioxidants. Choose a face mask created for your skin type or problem (for example, oily skin or redness). Pay attention to instructions on the packaging that will tell you how long you need to leave the face mask in place and how you should remove it. Apply a moisturizer after you take the face mask off.[7]
Always use face masks on clean and exfoliated skin.
You can also make a homemade face mask using 1 avocado, 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of plain yogurt, 1 teaspoon (5 ml) of olive oil, and 1 tablespoon (15 ml) of organic honey to the bowl. Leave the mask on for 15-20 minutes and rinse it with warm water.[Edit]Keeping Your Skin Hydrated in Winter
Avoid taking baths or hot showers. Soaking in a hot tub can be tempting when it’s cold outside, but it will certainly dry out your skin, as will a long, hot shower. Lukewarm water is best for keeping your skin as moisturized as possible.[8]
If you love taking baths, try making them a special once a week event and limit how long you spend in the water.
Add a layer between your skin and wool to avoid irritation. If you bundle up in wool clothes to keep warm, you might notice that your skin becomes itchy and irritated where it rubs up against the fabric. Try layering a more skin-friendly fabric, like cotton or silk, between your self and your wool sweater to keep warm without irritating your skin.[9]
Also wash your clothes using unscented or hypoallergenic detergent to reduce irritation on your skin.
Other fabrics that can irritate your skin include bamboo, acrylic, polyester, rayon, acetate, and nylon.[10]
Keep yourself hydrated. It’s important to keep hydrated year-round, but it can be harder in the winter. Adults need around 11.5 cups (2.7 liters)-15.5 cups (3.7 liters) of water every day. As a rule of thumb, if you feel thirsty, you are probably dehydrated. If you’re having trouble drinking enough water to stay hydrated, try eating foods that have a high water content such as cucumbers, tomatoes, zucchini, carrots, and kiwi.[11]
A lot of these foods also contain vitamin C, which can help your skin produce elastin and collagen.
Wear sunscreen, even on the darkest, cloudiest days. Even if it seems like the sun is a distant memory, it’s important to wear sunscreen every day. Low levels of sun exposure can contribute to skin damage over time, leading to wrinkles, spots, or even skin cancer.[12]
If you live in a place with high winds or extremely cold temperatures, also take care to protect your face from the elements by layering up with scarves, hats, and gloves.
Use a humidifier in your room during winter. Winter brings dry air, both indoors and outdoors, which can dry out your skin. Keep the humidity in your room at around 60% to keep your skin hydrated at night.[13]
Your skin repairs itself a lot while you are sleeping, so your bedroom is the best place for a humidifier.[Edit]Warnings
See a dermatologist if you have consistently dry, irritated skin that doesn’t get better.
Don’t scratch your skin. If you have an itch, try applying moisturizer or putting a barrier between your skin and an irritant.
Always test new skincare products on a small swatch of skin first to check for an allergic reaction.[14][Edit]Tips
To hydrate your lips, look for a balm with paraffin ceramides rather than beeswax. Ingredients like lanolin and vitamin E can also revive and hydrate lips.[15][Edit]References↑ https://www.bewell.com/blog/12-tips-to-keep-skin-soft-and-glowing-in-winter/

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/9-ways-to-banish-dry-skin

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-to-moisturize-face

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-to-moisturize-face

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-to-moisturize-face

↑ https://www.thecut.com/2014/12/winter-skin-guide-to-locking-in-the-moisture.html

↑ https://www.harpersbazaar.com/uk/beauty/skincare/news/a41160/how-to-apply-face-mask-mistakes/

↑ https://www.bewell.com/blog/12-tips-to-keep-skin-soft-and-glowing-in-winter/

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/9-ways-to-banish-dry-skin

↑ https://www.whowhatwear.com/worst-fabrics-for-skin/slide2

↑ https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-to-moisturize-face

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/9-ways-to-banish-dry-skin

↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-to-moisturize-face

↑ https://www.thecut.com/2014/12/winter-skin-guide-to-locking-in-the-moisture.html

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