How to Paint Pebbles

Whether you’re in the classroom or staying at home, painting pebbles is a fun, engaging craft that you can do just about anywhere! First, use soap and water to clean off any dirt and grime from the rocks. Once you’ve used sandpaper to buff away any rough edges, use a pencil and some scrap paper to plan out the design for your beautiful pebble. With some paint and varnish, you can create a masterpiece on any size pebble!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Drawing Your Design
Wash and dry the pebbles to remove any dirt. Find a variety of smooth stones outside and bring them to your sink. Squeeze a pea-sized amount of dish soap onto a soaked sponge, and lightly scrub all of the pebbles. As you clean, focus on getting rid of any dirt and filth on the stones. Once you’ve washed the pebbles, lay them on a towel or other clean surface to let them dry.[1]If you’re in a rush, feel free to dry off the stones individually.
Any kind of soap will work to clean the pebbles.
If you’d prefer to save time, consider buying smooth stones at a craft store.
Sand down any rough pebbles with 100-, 150-, and 220-grit sandpaper. Take a piece of 100-grit sandpaper and rub over any harsh, jagged edges on the pebble. Start with a coarse sheet of sandpaper, then work your way down to 220-grit. Continue rubbing down the pebbles until the entire surface is smooth.[2]It can be difficult to paint over a rough, uneven surface. Try to get the pebbles as smooth as possible to save yourself some trouble later on.
Pick a design for your pebble. Think about what the pebbles will be used for after they’re painted. Are you looking to make creative labels for your garden, or fun home decorations? Depending on your intended purpose, you might want to pick a design concept that’s on the simpler side.[3]
For instance, if you’re creating labels for your garden, you might want to paint the stone a solid color, then paint a specific word over that backdrop.
Create fun number and letter counters by painting the surface of the rock with black paint, then labeling it in white.
You might paint a decorative pebble with a ladybug design, or some other natural motif.
Draw out your design idea on a piece of scrap paper. Use pencil to sketch your basic concept. Don’t worry about the drawing being perfect—instead, focus on fleshing out different ideas until you have the perfect design for your pebble. [4]
Don’t feel like you have to commit to a single idea! Draw as many different designs as you want.
Use pencil to sketch this design on the pebble. Trace or freely draw your chosen artwork onto the pebble. Try to keep your lines as smooth as possible, so you’ll have an easier time tracing over and filling in the design with paint. If you mess up the pencil sketch at any point, simply draw over it—the old pencil etchings won’t be visible beneath the dried paint.[5]If you’re confident in your art skills, don’t worry about tracing on the design ahead of time.[Edit]Applying the Paint
Fill in the large, solid-colored portions of the design with acrylic paint. Take a thin paintbrush and dip it into a small well of acrylic paint. Use swift, smooth motions to spread the paint over the pebble’s surface. Focus on the background elements of the design first, like the backdrop color.[6]If you’re working with a more complex design, paint from back to front. For instance, if you’re painting a tree in front of a sunset, make sure to fill in the colors of the sky before painting in the tree.
Acrylic paint is an easy and inexpensive paint to use. If you accidentally spill some paint on your clothes or carpet, you can easily blot it away with dish soap![7]
Dry off the paint with a blow dryer. Plug in a hair dryer and turn it on low heat. Move the dryer back and forth over the painted surface of the stone, applying even amounts of heat to the paint. Continue moving the hair dryer over the painted pebble until the surface looks and feels dry.[8]
If you aren’t in a rush, feel free to set the pebbles aside and let them air-dry. Check on the stones once every hour or so to see if they’re dry.
Use thin, tapered paint brushes to add intricate details. Take a thin, tapered brush and dip it into the acrylic paint color of your choice. With short, careful movements, outline the finer details of the design on your painted pebble. Clean off the brush in between uses whenever you dip into a new color.[9]If your pebble’s artwork has multiple layers, be sure to use a blow dryer to dry off the surface.
Add artistic flair to your pebbles with chalk crayons and markers. Use a chalk crayon or marker to sketch or color in other elements of your design. Check that the base layer of paint is completely dry before you use any chalk markers or crayons.[10]Chalk markers and crayons are great ways to add lighter, pastel tones to your painted pebble. As the name suggests, they also look like chalk when applied to a surface.
Outline sections of dried paint with a thin black pen. Add extra detail to your painted pebble by highlighting important parts of the design. If you’d like to give your painted pebble a crisp, professional look, try outlining important elements of your art in pen. Make sure that all layers of paint are dry before you add any line work to the design.[11]These pens are especially useful for complex art designs.
For example, if you’re painting a heart onto your pebble, you might want to outline the heart in pen.[Edit]Sealing the Finished Art
Dip a clean paintbrush into some clear glue or varnish. Take a thin brush and coat it completely with clear varnish, sealant, or PVA glue. Choose a clear product to use for the sealing process, so your beautiful pebble artwork will be protected! [12]You can find clear sealants and glue at any hardware or home improvement store.
Apply a thin layer of varnish over the dried pebble. Brush on the clear product in smooth, even strokes. Focus on covering the entire painted surface of the pebble. Don’t worry about painting the back surface of the stone—you only need to protect the painted areas.[13]One layer of varnish or sealant should do the trick. If you’d like your painted pebble to be extra protected, consider applying a second coat.
Use a spray sealant if you’d prefer more coverage. Save yourself some preparation time by spraying the sealant onto your painted pebble. Look for products at your local hardware or home improvement store that come in a spray canister. You can make your clear top coat look a lot smoother and more even with this kind of product.[14]Whenever you use spray-on paint products, be sure to work in a well-ventilated area.
Wait for the sealant layer to dry completely. Leave your painted, sealed pebbles on a flat, open surface. Let the stones dry for several hours, checking on them periodically to see if the pebbles’ surface looks dry. If the varnish feels dry after you lightly tap it, then the pebbles are ready to be displayed![15][Edit]Things You’ll Need
Pebbles
Scrap paper
Pencil
Acrylic paint
Paintbrushes
Blow dryer (optional)
Chalk crayons (optional)
Chalk markers (optional)
Thin black pen
Clear glue or sealant
Spray sealant (optional)
[Edit]References↑ https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/resources/activity/painted-pebbles

↑ https://feltmagnet.com/crafts/PAINTING-AND-DRAWING-ON-STONES

↑ https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/resources/activity/painted-pebbles

↑ https://feltmagnet.com/crafts/PAINTING-AND-DRAWING-ON-STONES

↑ https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/resources/activity/painted-pebbles

↑ https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/resources/activity/painted-pebbles

↑ https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/cleaning/tips/a17273/stains-paint-latex-may07/

↑ https://feltmagnet.com/crafts/PAINTING-AND-DRAWING-ON-STONES

↑ https://colormadehappy.com/best-painting-rocks-supplies-guide/

↑ https://colormadehappy.com/best-painting-rocks-supplies-guide/

↑ https://colormadehappy.com/best-painting-rocks-supplies-guide/

↑ https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/resources/activity/painted-pebbles

↑ https://colormadehappy.com/best-painting-rocks-supplies-guide/

↑ https://colormadehappy.com/best-painting-rocks-supplies-guide/

↑ https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/resources/activity/painted-pebbles

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Today in History for 18th January 2020

Historical Events

1951 – 1951 NFL Draft: Kyle Rote from SMU first pick by New York Giants
1962 – US begins spraying foliage in Vietnam to reveal Viet Cong guerrillas
1973 – John Cleese’s final episode on “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” on BBC TV
1981 – Swedish tennis star Björn Borg claims his second straight ATP Masters Grand Prix title with a 6–4, 6–2, 6–2 win over Ivan Lendl at Madison Square Garden, NYC
2009 – AFC Championship, Heinz Field, Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh Steelers beat Baltimore Ravens, 23-14
2013 – Brandon Boyd announces his new band, Sons of the Sea

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Famous Birthdays

1921 – Robert Glaser, American educational psychologist (National Assessment of Educational Progress), born in Providence, Rhode Island (d. 2012)
1922 – Yehezkel Braun, Israeli composer (Shir ha-shirim), born in Breslau, Germany (d. 2014)
1933 – Jean Vuarnet, French alpine skier (Olympic gold downhill 1960; World C’ship gold 1960), born in Le Bardo, Tunisia (d. 2017)
1967 – MC Tab [Sharon Richard], American rapper, born in NYC, New York
1971 – Jonathan Davis, American singer (Korn), born in Bakersfield, California
1973 – Regilio Vreede, Dutch football player (Blue White, RKC), born in Paramaribo, Suriname

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Famous Deaths

1659 – Benedikt Lechler, German composer, dies at 64
1677 – Jan van Riebeeck, Dutch founder of Cape Colony (Cape Town), dies at 57
1913 – Edmond Robert Hubert Regout, Dutch industrialist and politician, dies at 49
1977 – Carl Zuckmayer, German/Swiss/US playwright (Second Wind), dies at 80
2002 – Alex Hannum, American Basketball Hall of Fame coach (1st ABA, NBA winning coach), dies at 78
2017 – Roberta Peters, American operatic soprano (NY Met), dies at 86

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How to Clean a Velvet Sofa

Cleaning a velvet sofa is easy and will keep the fabric looking fresh and brand new. To clean liquid spills that haven’t dried yet, use a clean cloth to blot the area dry. Gently rub dried stains with soap and water before air drying your sofa and brushing the velvet to restore the fabric. To clean your entire couch, vacuum it with a handheld vacuum or hose attachment. Once it’s clean, use a fabric protector to keep future stains and spills from damaging the fabric.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Vacuuming Your Sofa
Vacuum your sofa at least once a month to keep dirt from building up. Regularly vacuuming your sofa is the best way to ensure that surface contaminants don’t work their way into the fabric as people sit or lay down on your furniture. Vacuum your sofa with a handheld vacuum or hose attachment at least once a month to ensure that your sofa stays clean and comfortable.[1]
It won’t take more than 5-10 minutes to vacuum your sofa. This is a small price to pay for an elegant piece of furniture!
Use a soft-bristled brush to knock dust and dirt up. Before vacuuming your sofa, grab a soft-bristled brush or clothing brush. Remove any pillows or blankets from your sofa. Start on one end of the sofa and gently brush in long, even strokes. Cover each section of your sofa 2-3 times to knock up any dust, dirt, or grime that is hiding in your fabric.[2]
Vacuum your sofa using a hand vacuum or hose. Attach the fabric bristles to your hose or hand vacuum. Turn the vacuum on its lowest setting. Start on one end of your sofa and run the vacuum or hose across each pillow by working in vertical or horizontal strips. Move the vacuum in the same direction with each motion to ensure that your fabric is lifted the same way with each stroke. Vacuum the sides of the frame and the top of the pillows and frame to remove all of the dust, dirt, or crumbs.[3]
Lift your pillows out and vacuum behind them to remove the crumbs or dust that’s hiding behind the cushions.[Edit]Removing Stains and Spot-Cleaning
Address stains, spills, or dirt as soon as you notice them. To avoid stains from setting into your velvet furniture, clean them as soon as you spot them. The longer that you allow a contaminant or liquid to sit on your furniture, the more likely it is to stain or permanently damage your velvet.[4]
Blot wet spills dry with a clean cloth until they disappear. If a liquid has been spilled on your velvet, grab a clean, dry cloth. Take your cloth to the affected area and blot the area repeatedly. Tap it gently with the cloth to soak up the excess liquid. When a section of your cloth gets damp, move the cloth around in your hand until you find a dry section. Continue doing this until the spill is completely dried out.[5]
Avoid rubbing the cloth. Moving your cloth back and forth may work the liquid deeper into the fabric.
You can use paper towels instead of a dry cloth if you prefer, but if the paper towels aren’t highly absorbent, you’ll need to use a lot of them.
Mix a little soap with water to clean dried stains. If your liquid spill leaves a mark behind after it dries or you notice a dried stain on your sofa, clean it with soap and water. Grab a bowl and fill it with of lukewarm water. Then, add a few drops of unscented dish soap to the water and mix the solution with a spoon until soap bubbles form on the surface of the water.[6]
Spot test your cleaning solution in an inconspicuous area. Take a clean, microfiber cloth and dip it in your soap and water. Then, tap the cloth on an area of your couch that guests can’t see. The section underneath the sofa is best, but you can test it behind the sofa if your furniture is resting against the wall. Tap the velvet with your damp cloth 4-5 times and wait 1-2 minutes to see if the soap damages or stains your fabric.[7]
If the soap and water changes the color of your fabric, your fabric is probably slub or antique velvet. These types of velvet cannot be cleaned with liquid cleaning products. Contact a professional cleaning service to clean these types of velvet.
Rub the stained fabric with your cloth using smooth, gentle strokes. Take your cloth and dip it in the soap and water. Wring it over the bowl to remove the excess water and soap. Then, rub your stained area using gentle taps and soft strokes. Rub the entire area repeatedly until you’ve covered the area 3-4 times.[8]
You don’t want to soak your sofa, but you do need to get the entire area a little damp to let the soap remove the stain.
Allow the cleaned area to air dry for 30-60 minutes. If you can, open the window and turn a few fans on to keep the room well-ventilated. Wait at least 30 minutes to give the soap and water time to air out. Once the area looks dry, touch it lightly with the pad of your finger. If it’s still damp, continue to let the area air dry.[9]
Wait until the fabric is totally dry before brushing or sitting on your sofa.
Scrub the area you cleaned with a soft-bristled brush to restore the velvet. Grab a soft-bristled brush or clothing brush. Gently brush the dried area using short, flicking motions. This will restore the plushy look of the fabric. Continue brushing the area until the stain looks like it is entirely gone and the velvet is in its original condition.[10]
If the stain is still visible after brushing it, repeat this process until the stain is entirely gone. You may not be able to remove the stain if it has fully settled into the fabric, though.[Edit]Protecting Your Sofa
Check your sofa’s tag to see if it has already been treated. Look underneath the sofa and underneath the cushions to find the sofa’s tag. Inspect the tag carefully to see if the velvet has been treated before or not. If it has been waterproofed or treated, consult the manufacturer to see if additional fabric protectors will ruin the sofa.[11]
Get a fabric or upholstery protector designed for velvet. You can purchase a can of fabric protector at a local home goods or big box store. Read the label on a can of fabric protector to see if it is designed to protect fabric. Get a waterproofing fabric protector if you want to completely prevent liquid spills from damaging your sofa in the future. Get a standard fabric protector if you don’t want to change the feel of your velvet.[12]
A non-waterproof fabric protector will make your sofa easier to clean and keep it feeling soft.
A waterproof fabric protector will prevent liquids from immediately soaking into your fabric, but it isn’t a foolproof fix for liquid spills. Waterproofing aerosol sprays may change the feel of your velvet as well.
Test your protector in an inconspicuous area to make sure it’s safe. Once you bring your fabric protector home, read the instructions on the label carefully to see if there are any special steps that you need to take. Then, take the fabric protector and spray it underneath or behind your sofa to test it. Wait 5-10 minutes to see if it damages your fabric or modifies the color.[13]
If your fabric protector changes the color of your sofa or damages the fabric, you cannot use it to protect your furniture. Contact a professional cleaning service to find out how they can waterproof your sofa.
Mist your sofa with the fabric protector to preserve the fabric. Velvet doesn’t do well when soaked, so instead of spraying your protector directly into the fabric, mist it by spraying more than away from the surface of the sofa. Press the nozzle or pull the trigger repeatedly while moving the container across the surface of your sofa. Mist each section 3-4 times to apply your fabric protector.[14]
If your sofa is in a corner or against a wall, pull it away from the wall before applying your fabric protector.
Wait 1-2 hours to give your fabric protector time to dry. To give the protector time to work into the fabric, wait at least 1 hour to give it time to dry. Crack a window open or turn the fan on to keep the room well-ventilated while it dries.
If your sofa still feels a little damp when you go to check it, let it dry for an additional hour.
Keep your sofa out of direct sunlight to preserve it. Direct sunlight can cause your velvet’s color to fade over time. To keep the sofa looking new and beautiful, move your furniture so that you sofa isn’t sitting directly in front of a sunny window.[15]
This is particularly important if your velvet is a brighter color, like blue, red, or purple.[Edit]Tips
Get your velvet furniture professionally cleaned every 2-3 years. This will keep it comfortable and clean.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Removing Stains and Spot-Cleaning
Bowl
Water
Soap
Cloth
Soft-bristled brush[Edit]Vacuuming Your Sofa
Soft-bristled brush
Vacuum[Edit]Protecting Your Sofa
Fabric protector[Edit]References↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

↑ http://images.anthropologie.com/is/content/Anthropologie/Anthropologie_Furniture_UpholsteryGuide.pdf

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

↑ http://images.anthropologie.com/is/content/Anthropologie/Anthropologie_Furniture_UpholsteryGuide.pdf

↑ http://images.anthropologie.com/is/content/Anthropologie/Anthropologie_Furniture_UpholsteryGuide.pdf

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

↑ https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/a9139/how-to-clean-velvet/

↑ http://nymag.com/strategist/article/how-to-protect-fabric-furniture-from-stains.html

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

↑ https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/a9139/how-to-clean-velvet/

↑ https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/how-to-clean-velvet-furniture

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