How to Help a Cat with Anxiety

Just like humans, cats sometimes struggle with anxiety. If you notice your feline friend acting nervous, irritable, aggressive, or clingy, this may indicate that it’s anxious. You may be able to help by offering an enriching, low-stress environment. If your cat’s anxiety is new or severe, make an appointment with your vet to discuss possible causes and treatment options. It may not always be obvious if your cat is anxious, so get familiar with common signs of anxiety in cats if you’re not sure how your companion might be feeling.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Creating a Calming Environment
Offer places for your cat to perch and hide. Avoid trying to give the cat attention as it may interpret this as a sign of aggression. Back off and allow the cat to do what it needs to do to feel safe, even if that means hiding away for a while. Provide your cat with furniture to help it feel more secure, such as a cat tree with perching platforms and built-in “apartments.” Upside down cardboard boxes with a couple of holes cut into the sides also make good hiding spots. If your cat doesn’t feel like it has a safe space to retreat to when things get stressful, it may feel anxious and overwhelmed.[1]
Your cat may also appreciate having a designated area in the home where it can get away from other pets or children. For example, if you have a utility room, you could put a litter box and cat bed there and put a baby gate in the doorway to keep your dog out.
Cats also enjoy having high places where they can safely survey the world around them from above.[2] You may want to clear a pathway for your cat that’s up off the ground, such as along a shelf or along the back of a couch.
Give your cat safe areas to eat, sleep, and use the litter box. Your cat needs to feel secure while it is doing basic functions like eating, sleeping, and going to the bathroom. Place your cat’s food dishes, litter box, and bedding in low-traffic areas where it won’t be harassed by other pets or kids.[3]
For example, if your dog tries to pester your cat at mealtimes, try putting your cat’s food and water in an area the dog can’t reach, such as on a countertop or cat tree.
Provide toys for your cat to keep it busy. Cats are natural predators that need to engage in stalking and hunting behaviors to feel fulfilled and happy. To keep your cat from getting anxious and bored, provide a variety of toys and other forms of entertainment. Try to offer enrichment items that make your home more like the cat’s natural environment. Some good options include:[4]
Puzzle feeders to make mealtimes more fun and enriching.
Moving toys, like windup mice or robotic bugs, that your cat can chase.
Fishing rod toys, feather wands, or laser pointers for interactive play.
Fun things for your cat to watch, like fish tanks, bird feeders located outside your windows, or footage of fish, birds, or bugs on your TV.
Cat-safe plants, like potted cat grass or catnip.
Make sure your cat has scratching posts. Cats need to scratch to maintain their claws, but they also do it to mark their territory and relieve excitement or nervous energy.[5] To keep your cat from feeling anxious or engaging in destructive scratching, provide at least one scratching post or horizontal scratching surface.
You can buy a scratching post or board scratcher from a pet supply store, or make your own scratching post.
Pay attention to whether your cat prefers to scratch while standing upright or down on all fours. Choose an upright scratching post or a horizontal scratching board based on your cat’s preferences.
Cats like to scratch right after they wake up, so place a scratcher near your cat’s sleeping area. You can also place a scratcher near furniture or other objects you don’t want your cat to scratch.
Ignore your cat unless it’s asking for attention. This may seem counterintuitive, but one good way to calm an anxious cat is to act as if it isn’t there at all. Instead of trying to soothe your cat or sneak around quietly when it’s acting timid or scared, go about your business as usual. This will help your cat feel more at ease and less like it is the center of attention.[6]
Don’t make direct eye contact with your cat, talk to it, or try to touch it unless it approaches you first.
If your cat does approach you, reward the behavior with praise, treats, or gentle petting.
Getting down on the cat’s level can also make you seem less intimidating, such as by kneeling or even lying on the floor. Avoid looking down at the cat while standing up.
Use treats to bond with your anxious cat. Treats can help your cat build positive associations with you and its environment. Try offering treats to reward your cat when it approaches you or behaves calmly. You can also put treats around to encourage your cat to explore and get comfortable with the different parts of your home.[7]
If your cat is nervous about coming near you, try placing a treat in the palm of your hand. Sit quietly with your hand outstretched and see if the cat will come and take the treat from you.
If the cat is too anxious to get close to you, try tossing a treat to it at a distance. As your cat gets more comfortable, you can toss the treat closer to you.[Edit]Using Medications and Anxiety Aids
See your vet to rule out any underlying medical problems. Sometimes anxious behaviors can be a sign of a more serious physical condition. If you’re worried about your cat’s behavior or haven’t had any luck with adjusting your cat’s home environment, talk to your vet. They can give your cat an exam and try to determine what’s going on.[8]
Many common signs of anxiety, such as irritability, changes in appetite, or urinating outside the litter box, may also be symptoms of illness in cats.
Let your vet know when the behaviors started and if you’ve noticed any other symptoms.
If your vet can’t find any physical cause for your cat’s symptoms, they may refer you to a feline behavior specialist.
Try a pheromone spray in your cat’s living areas. A pheromone spray, such as Feliway, mimics the soothing scents that cats produce naturally from their facial glands. Your vet may recommend spraying a pheromone spray around your cat’s living and sleeping areas or placing a diffuser in rooms where your cat spends time.[9]
You can purchase pheromone sprays and diffusers online or from pet supply stores, such as Pet Remedy.[10] You may also be able to buy these products directly from your vet’s office.
You can also buy “calming collars” that are saturated with synthetic pheromones. Place one of these on your cat like an ordinary collar so that it can smell the calming pheromones at all times.
If you use a diffuser or calming collar, check the instructions to find out how often it needs to be replaced.
Ask your vet about using anti-anxiety medications. If your cat has severe anxiety and other treatment approaches don’t work, your vet may prescribe an anti-anxiety medication for your cat. Follow your vet’s directions for administering the medication, and don’t hesitate to reach out to them if you have any questions or concerns.[11]
Most anti-anxiety medications work by adjusting the balance of natural feel-good chemicals, such as serotonin and dopamine, in your cat’s brain.
You may need to give the medication for a few weeks before you notice a major difference in your cat’s behavior.
Let your vet know if your cat experiences side effects, such as vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or difficulty urinating.
Discuss using a calming supplement for your cat. While there are numerous supplements on the market that claim to treat anxiety in cats, there’s not always a lot of evidence for their effectiveness. Before trying a supplement, ask your vet to recommend one that may be safe and effective for your cat. Some supplements that may help include:[12]
Milk proteins, such as casein or alpha-casozepine. You can get prescription foods or tablets that contain these proteins.
L-theonine, an amino acid found naturally in tea.
Cat-safe botanical extracts, such as Magnolia officinalis and Phellodendron amurense.
Melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep patterns and reduce stress.
Tryptophan, an amino acid that helps stimulate the production of serotonin.[Edit]Recognizing the Symptoms of Anxiety
Watch for withdrawal and hiding behaviors. Many anxious cats will run from people and spend a lot of their time hiding. If you hardly ever see your cat, or if it gets skittish and runs away when you try to approach or touch it, that’s a good sign that your cat is feeling anxious.[13]
Your cat may retreat under the bed or hide in a high place, such as the top of a wardrobe or even your refrigerator.
Make note of your cat being extra clingy. While some cats react to anxiety by hiding, others won’t leave your side. If your cat won’t stop following you around and pestering you for attention, that may be a sign that it is feeling anxious.[14]
Some cats suffer from separation anxiety, and may become restless and destructive when you leave them alone.
Keep an eye out for changes in appetite. If your cat starts eating more or less than usual, this can also be a symptom of anxiety. Keep an eye on your cat’s food habits and pay attention to any changes.[15]
Listen for unusual vocalizations. An anxious cat may yowl, cry, or meow more than usual. Listen for meowing at unusual times, like the middle of the night.[16]
Like many other symptoms of anxiety in cats, this behavior can also be a sign of a physical illness. For example, yowling at night can be a symptom of a thyroid condition.[17]
Notice aggressive behaviors. Cats that are anxious may become irritable and lash out at humans or other pets in the home.[18] While it may seem like your cat is being “mean,” aggressive behaviors often signal that your cat is feeling stressed and fearful.
Always consult your vet if you notice sudden or unusual aggressive behavior from your cat.
Check for problems with using the litter box. Urinating of defecating outside the litter box are common signs of stress or anxiety in cats. In particular, cats that are anxious may spray urine in inappropriate places to try to mark their territory.[19]
If you notice your cat having litter box issues, contact your vet. These behaviors may also mean that your cat is sick. For example, a cat that urinates outside the litter box could have a urinary tract infection.
Be mindful of changes in grooming. An anxious cat may neglect its coat, causing it to appear dirty or scruffy.[20] On the other hand, your anxious cat might also overgroom itself, leading to bald or stubbly patches and skin sores.[21] Call your vet if you notice changes in your cat’s grooming behaviors, since these can be signs of either behavioral or physical problems.
For example, a scruffy coat, bald patches, or skin sores can also be signs that your cat has a flea allergy.[Edit]Tips
Your vet may be able to prescribe short-term anxiety medications or sedatives to reduce anxiety in high-stress situations, such as a move, a long plane or car ride, or a vet visit.
If you notice changes in your cat’s behavior, try to think of possible triggers, such as the addition or loss of a pet or human family member in the household, or unusual noise or activity in your home.[Edit]Warnings
Most of the symptoms of anxiety in cats can also be signs of pain, injury, or illness. Don’t assume your cat is anxious just because it displays some or all of the common symptoms of anxiety.
Be patient with your cat. Getting angry at it or trying to force it to overcome its anxious behaviors too quickly will only make your cat feel more stressed and fearful.[22][Edit]References↑ https://arapahoeanimalhospital.com/2019/03/01/anxiety-in-cats/

↑ https://icatcare.org/advice/problem-behaviour/anxious-cats

↑ https://www.paws.org/library/cats/home-life/helping-your-cat-adjust/

↑ https://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/02/magazine/how-to-cure-a-cats-anxiety.html

↑ https://www.humanesociety.org/resources/cats-destructive-scratching

↑ https://icatcare.org/advice/problem-behaviour/anxious-cats

↑ https://icatcare.org/advice/problem-behaviour/anxious-cats

↑ https://icatcare.org/advice/problem-behaviour/anxious-cats

↑ https://icatcare.org/advice/problem-behaviour/anxious-cats

↑ https://petremedy.co.uk/

↑ https://news.vet.tufts.edu/2017/09/mood-stabilizing-medications-for-cats/

↑ https://www.bestfriendsvet.com/library/general-topics/antianxiety-medications/

↑ https://icatcare.org/advice/problem-behaviour/anxious-cats

↑ https://arapahoeanimalhospital.com/2019/03/01/anxiety-in-cats/

↑ https://arapahoeanimalhospital.com/2019/03/01/anxiety-in-cats/

↑ https://arapahoeanimalhospital.com/2019/03/01/anxiety-in-cats/

↑ https://news.vet.tufts.edu/2017/09/mood-stabilizing-medications-for-cats/

↑ https://news.vet.tufts.edu/2017/09/mood-stabilizing-medications-for-cats/

↑ https://news.vet.tufts.edu/2017/09/mood-stabilizing-medications-for-cats/

↑ https://arapahoeanimalhospital.com/2019/03/01/anxiety-in-cats/

↑ https://www.mspca.org/angell_services/overgrooming-cats/

↑ https://icatcare.org/advice/problem-behaviour/anxious-cats

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Today in History for 19th January 2020

Historical Events

1419 – French city of Rouen surrenders to Henry V in Hundred Years War
1899 – Anglo-Egyptian Sudan forms
1922 – Geological survey says US oil supply would be depleted in 20 years
1949 – Cuba recognises Israel.
1988 – “48 Hours” premieres on CBS-TV
1991 – Jumbo Tsuruta beats Stan Hansen to win All Japan Triple Crown title

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Famous Birthdays

1679 – Girolamo Chiti, Italian composer and music theorist, born in Siena (d. 1759)
1902 – Heinrich Schmist-Barrien, German author (Moorkeerl)
1909 – Hans Hotter, German bass-baritone (d. 2003)
1924 – Nicholas Colasanto, American actor (Cheers, Family Plot, The Counterfeit Killer), born in Providence, Rhode Island (d. 1985)
1970 – Udo Suzuki, Japanese comedian, born in Yamagata Prefecture, Japan
1977 – Nicole, Chilean singer, born in Chile

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Famous Deaths

1934 – Armand Parent, composer, dies at 70
1948 – Tony Garnier, French architect (b. 1869)
1992 – Manabendra Mukhopadhyay, Bengali singer and composer (Ei Ganga ei Padda), dies at 60
2000 – Bettino Craxi, Prime Minister of Italy (b. 1934)
2011 – Ernest McCulloch, Canadian stem cell research pioneer, dies at 84
2013 – Earl Weaver, American hall of fame MLB manager, dies from a heart attack at 82

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How to Increase Good Bacteria in Your Gut

There are two kinds of foods that help balance your gut: prebiotics and probiotics. You can get both through a healthy diet. However, if you’re still having digestive trouble, you might want to consider adding a supplement. Keep in mind that everyone’s gut will react differently to different kinds of foods. Instead of trying to stick to strict rules, find a diet that works well for you and makes your gut feel good.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Eating Gut-Friendly Foods
Opt for a mostly plant-based diet. Animal products can irritate the gut and kill good bacteria. On the other hand, plant-based foods act like fertilizer for good bacteria and create a healthy environment for good bacteria to grow in. You don’t need to be a vegetarian or vegan to increase good bacteria, but adding more fruits, vegetables, and legumes to your diet can help.[1]
Plant-based foods include fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and legumes.
Include plenty of prebiotic foods in your daily diet. Prebiotic foods promote the growth of good bacteria in your gut. Eating prebiotic foods is essential to maintaining a balance between good and bad bacteria. Try to include a prebiotic food into every meal.[2]
Some of the best prebiotic foods include oats, asparagus, dandelion greens, leeks, garlic, bananas, onions, apples, flaxseed, and cocoa.
Eat 25-30 g of fiber every day. Fiber feeds healthy bacteria and promotes good digestion. Get a mix of soluble and insoluble fibers. Soluble fiber helps produce stool and could lower cholesterol. Insoluble fiber helps move food through the intestines.[3]
Some good sources of soluble fibers include: fruits like apples, oranges, and grapefruit; vegetables; legumes like lentils, dry beans, and peas; barley; oats; and oat bran.
Some good sources of insoluble fiber include: fruits with edible peels or seeds; whole-wheat bread, pasta, and crackers; bulgur wheat; corn meal; cereal; bran; rolled oats; buckwheat; and brown rice.
Add more fermented foods to your diet. Naturally fermented foods are one of the best natural sources for probiotics, and they help introduce good bacteria into your gut. There are no guidelines for how much fermented food you should eat to see the benefits, so add in as much fermented food to your diet as you can.[4]
Good sources of fermented foods include sauerkraut, kombucha, miso, tempeh, pickled vegetables, yogurt with live cultures, and kefir.
There is some debate about whether or not the live cultures survive all the way to your gut, but people who eat fermented foods usually report fewer digestion issues.
Limit how much red meat, dairy, and saturated and trans fats you eat. Red meat and high-fat dairy products can slow down the growth of good bacteria in your gut. Fried foods can also promote the growth of bad bacteria.[5]
Lean meats, like skinless chicken or turkey, as well as fish and shellfish are good alternatives for red meat.
Choose olive oil over butter or margarine.[Edit]Using Medicine
Try taking a daily probiotic supplement. Probiotics may help some people digest better, and add good bacteria to the gut. However, you have to take them consistently every day in order to keep good bacteria alive and functioning. Look for probiotics that include lactobacillus acidophilus if you have trouble digesting dairy, bifidobacterium bifidum if you have IBS, lactobacillus rhamnosus to guard against traveller’s diarrhea, and bifidobacterium longum if you struggle with constipation.[6]
Follow the dosing instructions that come with your specific probiotics.
Some people feel better when they take probiotics while others don’t notice a difference. Give it a few weeks after you start taking probiotics and if you don’t notice a change, it’s probably not worth it.
Consider a fecal transplant for stubborn gut infections. A fecal transplant is a relatively new procedure for people who suffer from C. difficile colitis. If you suffer from diarrhea, stomach aches, or bloody stools that last for 2 or more days, this could be a sign of C. difficile colitis. During a fecal transplant, a doctor will use a colonoscopy to introduce donor stool into your colon. You will be sedated for the procedure. A fecal transplant is usually only considered in stubborn or recurring cases.[7]
A fecal transplant is considered after a round of antibiotics.
Avoid antibiotics unless they are absolutely necessary. Antibiotics kill good bacteria as well as bad bacteria. Of course, you should take antibiotics if you really need to, but talk to your doctor about if you have other options.[8]
Antibiotics are used in animal agriculture, so there is a possibility that eating more animal products can put more antibiotics into your digestive system and kill good bacteria.[Edit]Tips
Prebiotic carbohydrates are a substrate that help good bacteria and beneficial microbiota grow.
Many things affect your microbiota, some of which you can change. Your maternal microbiota are present when you’re born. However, diet, environmental exposure, and antibiotic use can have secondary effects on microbiota colonization.
Practicing healthy habits like exercising, getting enough sleep, and managing stress could also potentially have a positive impact on good bacteria in your gut.[Edit]References↑ https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/articles/what_should_you_eat_for_a_healthy_gut

↑ https://www.umassmed.edu/nutrition/blog/blog-posts/2019/5/the-10-best-prebiotic-foods-for-ibd/

↑ https://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/increasing_fiber_intake/

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/can-gut-bacteria-improve-your-health

↑ https://www.pcrm.org/health-topics/gut-bacteria

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/can-gut-bacteria-improve-your-health

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/can-gut-bacteria-improve-your-health

↑ https://www.pcrm.org/health-topics/gut-bacteria

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