How to Clear Your Sinuses and Ears

Your sinuses and ears are connected by way of your Eustachian tubes. So, if they get clogged or inflamed, then you can feel awful pressure and congestion in both of them at the same time. Fortunately, there are things you can do to try to clear your sinuses and ears. You can work to decongest your sinuses by drinking plenty of water, using medication, and moisturizing your sinuses. You can also help them drain on their own by avoiding temperature fluctuations, pressure changes, and substances like caffeine and alcohol, which can make your symptoms worse. If your symptoms get worse or don’t improve after more than a week, see your doctor.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Decongesting Your Sinuses
Drink at least 8 glasses of water a day to thin mucus. Staying hydrated will allow your body to be better able to expel any mucus that’s built up in your sinuses and ears. To help clear them, drink an glass of water every hour or so to keep your membranes lubricated and any mucus thin.[1]
Thin mucus will drain from your sinuses and ears easier.
For the best results, warm up the water in a kettle and drink it while it’s comfortably hot. To enhance the flavor and add extra decongesting power, mix in a little ginger, honey, and cinnamon.
Place a warm, damp cloth on your face to loosen any mucus. Soak a washcloth in warm water and wring it out. Then, lay it over your face and nose and leave it on for 5 minutes, or until the cloth gets cold. The heat will warm your sinuses and loosen the mucus, making it easier to clear them.[2]
Make sure the water is hot, but not so hot that you can burn your skin.
You can repeat this process as many times as you want to help relieve sinus pressure.
You can also loosen your mucus by steaming your sinuses. Boil some water in a pot and set it on a level surface, then position yourself over the pot and drape a towel over your head. Carefully lift the lid of the pot to let the steam out under the towel so you can breathe it in.
Blow your nose to clear out your sinuses and relieve pressure. If the mucus in your sinuses is thin enough to be expelled, blow your nose gently into a napkin or tissue paper. Removing the mucus from your sinuses will relieve pressure and congestion in your sinuses and your ears.[3]
For difficult congestion, block 1 nostril and blow through the other so you can clear them.
Take an oral decongestant to drain and clear your sinuses. Over-the-counter decongestants can both thin out any mucus present in your sinuses as well as lubricate your membranes so it’s easier for the mucus to drain. Follow the recommended dose listed on the packaging of the decongestant.[4]
You can find decongestants at your local pharmacy.
For serious congestion, call your doctor and ask if they can prescribe a prescription-strength decongestant.
Don’t take a decongestant for longer than 3 days unless your doctor advises you otherwise. Using a decongestant for too long can end up making your congestion worse.
Be cautious about using oral decongestants if you have high blood pressure, closed angle glaucoma, or an overactive thyroid gland. If you have one of these conditions, stick to using Mucinex unless your doctor advises otherwise.
Try a mucolytic medication to loosen your mucus. Mucolytics, such as Mucinex, work by loosening up the fluid in your nose and ears, making it easier to drain. If you’re an adult, you can take 600 mg of Mucinex with a full glass of water twice a day.
Always talk to a pediatrician before giving mucolytics to a child.
Use a nasal saline spray to help decongest your sinuses. A saline spray will moisten and lubricate your sinuses, which will help you clear them out. Clearing your sinuses will reduce pressure in your ears and help any fluid trapped there drain more easily.[5]
Use 1-2 drops of saline nasal spray in each nostril every 2 hours. You can use a saline spray as long as you like, and you can also use it preventatively.
If saline spray isn’t enough to relieve your congestion, you can use it in combination with a spray containing decongestant medication, such as Afrin. You may not need any additional oral decongestants.
If you’re using a medicated spray, read the packaging to make sure you can use it if you’ve already taken decongestant medication. Use the decongestant spray as directed on the packaging and don’t use it for more than 3 consecutive days so your sinuses can start to regulate themselves after you clear them.
You can find nasal sprays, such as saline sprays or medicated sprays, at your local pharmacy.
Wash out your sinuses with a neti pot. A neti pot is a small, spouted pot that you can use to rinse your nasal passages with saline solution. To use the pot, stand over your sink and tilt your head at a 45° angle. Then, pour half of the saline into your upper nostril while breathing through your mouth. Repeat the process with the other nostril, then gently blow your nose to clear out the water and mucus.[6]
You may find it more comfortable to use warm water with the neti pot. The water should be around body temperature ().
Put a medicated rub on your chest to soothe your sinuses. A medicated chest rub, such as Vicks VapoRub, can soothe your irritated nasal passages and help you breathe a little easier. Use the rub according to the directions on the package.
Don’t use VapoRub or any other medication containing camphor on a child under 2 years old. To use the rub safely on children over 2 and adults, only apply it to the chest and neck, and never to the face or around the nostrils.[7]
Take a hot shower to flush your sinuses and ears. The steam and heat from the shower will work to loosen mucus in your sinuses and will help drain your ears to clear them. You’ll also feel much better after cleaning yourself and expelling any loose mucus and fluid.[8]
Use hot water to create more steam in the shower, but don’t make it so hot that you burn yourself.
Place a humidifier in the room with you to keep from drying out. If your sinuses and ears are blocked or clogged up, dry air can make them even worse by drying out the mucus so it’s hard. Use a humidifier to add moisture to the air, which will help to keep your sinuses and ears lubricated and moist to help clear out any gunk in them.[9]
Place the humidifier somewhere higher up like on a dresser or on top of a shelf so it can evenly distribute moisture throughout the room.[Edit]Staying Comfortable
Avoid major temperature changes. Going out into super hot or really cold weather can make your sinuses and ears worse and more difficult to clear. If you’ve got clogged sinuses and ears, stay in a consistent environment, such as your home or office, so they’re better able to clear themselves out. If you do have to go outside, make sure you’re dressed comfortably for the weather so you don’t overheat or catch a cold chill.[10]
Don’t go for a run outside if it’s too hot to try to sweat it out. The fluctuation can make your symptoms worse.
Avoid cold-weather activities, which can harden any fluids in your sinuses and ears.
Don’t drink coffee or alcohol if your sinuses and ears are clogged. Caffeine and alcohol both affect your body’s circulation. Changes in your blood flow and heart rate can put added strain on your blood vessels, which can affect both your sinuses and your ears.[11]
Avoid your morning cup of joe until your sinuses and ears are clear.
Drinking alcohol may make you feel slightly better in the short term, but your sinus and ear pressure will only get worse if you add the effects of a hangover on top of them.
Limit your dairy intake if it makes your symptoms worse. Dairy products, such as milk, yogurt, and cheese, can cause your phlegm to feel thicker and more irritating. If you have a dairy allergy, it can also trigger symptoms such as a runny or stuffy nose and post-nasal drip. Avoid drinking milk or eating dairy if it seems to aggravate your congested sinuses and ears.[12]
Try dairy alternatives, such as soy or almond milk, if dairy makes you congested.
Eat chicken soup or bone broth to clear your congestion. Chicken soup won’t cure a cold, but it really can help you feel better. Warm chicken soup or bone broth not only helps clear congestion, but can also reduce inflammation and soothe irritation in your nasal passages. Try a little soothing chicken soup, chicken broth, or bone broth to reduce your congestion.[13]
Ingredients like garlic, onions, and ginger can both enhance the flavor of the soup and give your immune system a boost.
Stand up slowly to avoid getting dizzy. Pressure in your sinuses and inner ear can affect your balance and coordination. If you’ve got congestion or pressure in your sinuses and ears, don’t stand up too fast or you could feel dizzy and potentially fall or faint.[14]
Move in increments if you’re getting out of a bed or chair. Sit upright, use your hands to help lift yourself, and then rise slowly so you don’t get dizzy.
Keep your head held upright to help with drainage. Bending forward or holding your head down can make pressure in your sinuses and ears worse. It can also inhibit the natural drainage that your sinuses and ears do on their own. To help clear your sinuses and ears faster, sit upright as best as you can.[15]
Try to sleep with your head elevated as well.[Edit]Warnings
If your symptoms don’t go away after more than a week, see your doctor for treatment.[Edit]References↑ https://www.self.com/story/how-much-water-should-you-drink-when-youre-sick

↑ https://www.thehealthy.com/headaches/sinus-headache-home-remedies/

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/what_to_do_about_sinusitis

↑ http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/expert.q.a/09/20/ear.drainage.shu/index.html

↑ http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/expert.q.a/09/20/ear.drainage.shu/index.html

↑ https://cdn.himalayaninstitute.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/about-press-netipot-safetyguide.pdf

↑ https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/common-cold/expert-answers/nasal-decongestant/faq-20058569

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/what_to_do_about_sinusitis

↑ https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/common-cold/in-depth/humidifiers/art-20048021

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/ear-nose-throat/inflamed-sinuses-its-best-to-watch-and-wait

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/ear-nose-throat/inflamed-sinuses-its-best-to-watch-and-wait

↑ https://www.allergy.org.au/patients/food-other-adverse-reactions/milk-mucus-and-cough

↑ https://exploreim.ucla.edu/wellness/an-inside-scoop-on-the-science-behind-chicken-soup-and-the-common-cold/#chickensoup

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/what_to_do_about_sinusitis

↑ https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/what_to_do_about_sinusitis

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Today in History for 23rd January 2020

Historical Events

1912 – The International Opium Convention is signed at The Hague
1942 – Battle of Rabaul: Japanese attack Australian air base in Rabaul, New Britain
1967 – Stan Musial is named GM of Cards
1968 – Spy ship USS Pueblo and 83-man crew seized in Sea of Japan by North Korea
1970 – Australia’s 1st amateur radio satellite (Oscar 5) launched (California)
1987 – Japan 1st exceeds military spending cap of 1% of GNP ($23 billion)

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1719 – John Landen, English mathematician, born in England, United Kingdom (d. 1790)
1905 – Konstanty Ildefons Gałczyński, Polish poet (Zielona Ges), born in Warsaw, Poland (d. 1953)
1971 – Lorne Spicer, British TV presenter, born in Upminster, United Kingdom
1974 – Tiffani Theissen, American actress (Saved by Bell, 90210), born in Long Beach, California
1974 – Yosvani Pérez, Cuban baseball player, born in Rodas, Cuba
1986 – Steven Taylor, English footballer, born in Greenwich, London

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1199 – Yaqub, Almohad Caliph (b. 1160)
1648 – Francisco de Rojas Zorrilla, Spanish playwright (Del Rey Abajo Ninguno), dies at 40
1976 – Paul Robeson, American singer (Old Man River), actor and civil rights activist, dies in Philadelphia at 77
1981 – Samuel Barber, American composer (School for Scandal), dies of cancer at 70
1993 – Keith Laumer [Anthony LeBaron], American sci-fi author (Retief’s War), dies at 67
2005 – Morys George Lyndhurst Bruce, 4th Baron Aberdare, British politician (b. 1921)

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How to Drive Less

Whether you’d like to reduce your environmental footprint, reduce expenses, get more exercise, spend less time stuck in traffic, or all of the above, one of the best things to do is to drive less when you can. You can cut back on your driving by using alternative forms of transportation, staying close to home, and making small changes to the way you drive. With these easy changes, you’ll be driving less in no time!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using Alternative Forms of Transportation
Ride a bike to your destination if it’s within a reasonable distance. If your trip is less than away, try going by bicycle. You’ll get exercise and fresh air, and you’ll have a lane all to yourself. You might even get there as fast as you would sitting by traffic in a car.[1]
If you don’t own a bike, look into bike-share programs in your community.[2]
Get a rack, backpack, or a trailer if you need to carry things.
If it’s been a while since you’ve been on a bicycle, start by doing short, easy trips to gain confidence before you ride a long distance.
Walk to your destination if it’s close enough. If you’re traveling less than , enjoy some fresh air and walk to your destination. It’s great exercise, and it offers a nice break from other fast-paced activities.[3]
For example, if you live within of your place of work or school, then you could walk there.
Make sure to use sidewalks, crosswalks, and other safe walking areas if you decide to walk to your destination.
Take public transportation 1 or more days per week. Find out what the public transportation options are in your community and take advantage of them. You can use your bus or train time for things you couldn’t do while driving. Read a book or magazine, sleep, catch up on your email, plan your day, learn a language, or do a portable craft, such as knitting or crocheting.[4]
You can walk or bike to the bus stop, or drive to a park-and-ride lot
Carpool to work or school to reduce the environmental impact of driving. If you must drive to school or work every day, try taking along a few passengers. This is a great way to help other people cut back on their driving and reduce your impact on the environment. You can share the cost of gas, get some company on your commute, and you may be able to use a high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane to save additional time.[5]
Find out if any of your coworkers or classmates live near you and would be interested in carpooling.
Use apps to connect with neighbors with similar commute patterns.
Check rideshare boards to identify people going your way if you are taking a longer drive or road trip.[Edit]Staying Closer to Home
Choose destinations that are close to home whenever possible. Reducing the length of your trip to work, school, shopping, and wherever else you need to go is a painless, easy way to cut down on the time you spend in the car. It also makes it easier to use transportation other than driving when you don’t have far to go.[6]
Try shopping for your groceries at a local supermarket rather than driving 20 miles to a major shopping center.
Walk to a café in your neighborhood rather than driving through at a fast food restaurant to get coffee.
You could even bike or walk to school or work if you live close enough.
Do what you can online or by phone to avoid going out. Take advantage of websites where you can order items that you use frequently to cut down on your trips to the store. Comparison shop online rather than hunting all over town, or call merchants to ask about prices and availability before you go.[7]
For example, you could try ordering your groceries online and have them delivered to eliminate a trip to the store.
Pay bills online or by phone rather than paying in person.
Make check deposits using a banking app instead of driving to the bank.
Ask your employer if you can work from home 1 day per week. If you can perform your work remotely, then you might ask your employer about telecommuting. Not all jobs are suited to it, and not all managers and workplaces are willing to consider it, but if you can save on even 1 day’s commute per week, it will add up.[8]
Try pointing out the perks of allowing you to work from home for 1 day of the week, such as increased productivity, higher morale, and reducing environmental impact by cutting back on your commute.
Some people even find that they are more productive without all the distractions of a busy office.[Edit]Finding Little Ways to Reduce Driving Time
Combine errands and trips when you need to drive somewhere. If you need to drive somewhere, do your best to minimize the number of individual trips you need to make. Make a list of the places you need to go and what you need to get before you head out.[9]
Try to avoid driving back and forth across town as well. Stop at places on the way to and from your other destinations. For example, you could visit the post office or doctor while you’re in that part of town, or stop by the store on your way home from work or school.
Park in the first space that you find when you arrive at your destination. Instead of circling the parking lot looking for the perfect space, pull into the first available one even if it’s far from the entrance. You may reduce your time spent in the car by as much as 10 minutes by not circling for a closer spot, and you will get some extra steps in by parking further from the entrance. Parking further away even counts as part of your daily exercise![10]
If valet parking is an option at a crowded venue, then you might also try this option for parking. You usually have to pay for valet parking, but it might be worth it for the time and energy you could spend looking for a place to park.
Use map and transit applications to plan your trips. Maps and apps can help you to shorten your route and avoid traffic slowdowns. Some map applications can also tell you where the roads are congested so you can avoid getting stuck in traffic. By following the app’s suggestions for alternative routes, you can cut back on the amount of time that you will spend behind the wheel.[11][Edit]References↑ https://www.sdcoastkeeper.org/blog/change-your-habits/top-ten-simple-ways-to-drive-your-car-less

↑ https://www.epa.gov/transportation-air-pollution-and-climate-change/what-you-can-do-reduce-pollution-vehicles-and-engines

↑ https://www.sdcoastkeeper.org/blog/change-your-habits/top-ten-simple-ways-to-drive-your-car-less

↑ https://www.sdcoastkeeper.org/blog/change-your-habits/top-ten-simple-ways-to-drive-your-car-less

↑ https://www.sdcoastkeeper.org/blog/change-your-habits/top-ten-simple-ways-to-drive-your-car-less

↑ https://www.sdcoastkeeper.org/blog/change-your-habits/top-ten-simple-ways-to-drive-your-car-less

↑ https://www.sdcoastkeeper.org/blog/change-your-habits/top-ten-simple-ways-to-drive-your-car-less

↑ https://www.epa.gov/transportation-air-pollution-and-climate-change/what-you-can-do-reduce-pollution-vehicles-and-engines

↑ https://www.sdcoastkeeper.org/blog/change-your-habits/top-ten-simple-ways-to-drive-your-car-less

↑ https://www.nbcnews.com/health/diabetes/new-exercise-guidelines-even-parking-little-farther-away-counts-n935176

↑ https://www.milwaukieoregon.gov/citymanager/drive-less-save-more-milwaukie

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