How to Hang Bikes from the Ceiling

While bikes are convenient and useful ways to get exercise, they aren’t as practical when the weather gets cold and icy. Instead of having your bike take up space in your home, consider hanging it from the ceiling of your garage, attic, basement, or other storage area! If you’re looking for a simple way to hang up your bikes, try attaching a rubber hook to a ceiling joist and dangling your equipment by one wheel. If you’re looking for a more convenient way to lift and lower your bikes, try using a pulley system instead!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Storing Bikes on Rubber Hooks
Select a rubber or other non-metal hook to hold your bikes. Check your local hardware store or sporting goods shop to find a rubber hook, or a hook that isn’t made of bare metal. Look for a piece of equipment that’s about thick, so you can hang it in your storage area without it taking up too much space.[1]
Don’t use metal hooks for long-term storage, as these can scrape and damage the wheels of your bike.
Find a section of your ceiling that won’t interfere with your vehicles. Search in your cellar, attic, garage or other storage area for a place where your bikes can stay for a long period of time. Depending on the height of your ceiling, you might not want to keep your bike in the center of your storage space.[2]
If you aren’t sure whether or not your bike will be able to fit safely to your garage ceiling, take a quick measurement of your ceiling, vehicle, and bike’s height to make sure.
Tap the ceiling with your hand to find the ceiling joists. Set up a ladder to reach the ceiling. If the surface is covered in drywall, tap around the ceiling to find a solid area. Once you’ve found a solid spot, mark it with a pencil or some other writing tool.[3]
Hollow areas will sound echoey when you tap on them, while solid areas will sound firm.
If your ceiling has beams instead of drywall, you don’t have to worry about this.
If you’re having difficulty finding the ceiling joists, you can also use a stud finder.
Measure the hook’s diameter to choose a proper drill bit. Examine the rubber hook that you’re planning to hang from your ceiling. Measure the diameter of the screw, then select an electric drill bit that’s about ⅔ of the screw’s width. Always use a drill bit that’s smaller in diameter than the hook that you’re using. When the bit is slightly smaller, you can firmly and securely install the hook into the ceiling.[4]
If your drill bit is too large, your hook might be too loose.
Create a pilot hole in the ceiling with an electric drill. Take your chosen bit and twist it into your drill. With a small amount of force, guide the drill into a solid section of beam. Use the entire length of the bit to create your pilot hole, then remove the device.[5]
Screw your ceiling hook into the drilled pilot hole. Use your hands to push and twist the ceiling hook into the pilot hole. Turn the hook clockwise to secure it into the ceiling. If you’re having trouble tightening the hook, stick a screwdriver horizontally through the curved portion of the hook and twist it like a vice.[6]
Continue twisting until the hook is secure, and no longer shifts or turns.
Install a second hook if you want to hang your bike by 2 wheels. Measure the distance between the center axles of your bike wheels. Once your first hook is in place, use a tape measure to mark off that same distance from the initial hook. Drill a guiding hole through this mark, then twist a second bike hook into place.[7]
If you’re planning on hanging up several bikes, use this measuring system to install multiple hooks.
Wipe down your bike with a wet paper towel. Take a damp paper towel or disinfectant wipe and clean off any visible dust, sweat or grime from your bike. Try and clean off all sections of the bike, as you don’t want any dust or debris falling and clogging up the chains and gears of your bike while it’s in storage.[8]
Sweat can be commonly found on most bikes, especially if you use your equipment a lot. Try to wipe away sweat as soon as you see it, or it could drip further into your bike.
Lift your bicycle and mount the wheel on the hook. Hold your bike from the center tube and bring it to the ceiling. Rotate your bike slowly, lifting the metal rim of the back wheel over the curve of the hook. Remove 1 hand at a time to make sure that your bike is secure.[9]
There’s nothing wrong with placing your equipment in an upside-down or perpendicular position.
Mount both wheels if you have 2 hooks. Hold your bike from the center tube and lift it upwards. Rotate the equipment by 180 degrees, bringing both wheels up to the hooks. Place 1 wheel onto a ceiling hook at a time, making sure that the metal rim is resting over the rubber hook. Remove your hands gradually to make sure that the bike is in place.[10][Edit]Using a Pulley System
Acquire a pulley kit from your local hardware store. Before you begin any construction in your storage area, head to a hardware store or sporting goods shop to purchase a “bike pulley” or “bike hoist” kit. These kits generally include 2 pulley brackets, 2 hooks, a length of cord, and the screws needed for installation. You can save a lot of time by purchasing these supplies in a bundle, instead of searching for each part individually.[11]
You can get a pulley kit for as low as $9.
Tap the ceiling to locate the ceiling joists. Form a fist and knock on the ceiling of your storage area. Depending on the place you’re storing your bikes, you might see visible beams and joists that you can use for your pulley system. If your ceiling is obscured or otherwise covered, tap on a specific area and listen for a firm or echoing sound. If the resonating sound is firm, then you’ve found a joist.[12]
Try measuring to find another ceiling joist, just to make sure.[13]
Screw 1 pulley bracket into a ceiling joist with an electric drill. Arrange your metal bracket along the length of the joist where you’d like your bike to hang. Don’t worry about the exact measurements of your bike at this point. Instead, use your hand to hold the pulley in place, and use an electric drill to secure 4 screws into the corresponding bracket holes.[14]
Depending on your storage space, you might have difficulty attaching the screws in the joist right off the bat. In this case, use your drill bit to form as many pilot holes as there are openings in the bracket. This will make it easier for you to add screws later on.
You’ll need bike measurements when attaching the second pulley bracket.
Measure the width of your bike seat to the handlebars. Take a measuring tape and extend it from the back of your bike seat to the center of your handlebars. Write down this measurement or commit it to memory, as it will help you arrange and attach your second pulley bracket.[15]
The pulley system hooks along the back edge of your bike seat and the front your handlebars.
Drill a pilot hole using the measurements from your bike. Use your measuring tape to determine your bike’s length in relation to the first pulley. Arrange the pulley bracket along the same ceiling joist, centering it over the end of your bike measurement. Hold the bracket in place with your hand, using your electric drill to create pilot holes through the openings of the bracket.[16]
This process is the same as when you attached the first pulley bracket.
Thread and knot the pulley cord through the second bracket. Pull a section of your pulley cord through the back opening of your bracket. Use a firm knot to keep the cord in place, so the pulley system is secure. Once you’ve knotted the rope, let the rest of the cord dangle.[17]
Figure-eight knots are good for this kind of project.
The hole for the pulley cord is separate from the openings for the screws. Look for the end of the pulley that has an extra opening to figure out where the cord goes.
Attach the second pulley bracket using the pilot holes. With the cord looped through the back, arrange the metal bracket over the pilot holes that you drilled previously. Use an electric drill to attach screws through these openings. Continue applying pressure until the bracket is firmly secured to the ceiling.[18]
Don’t attach any screws over the cord.
Loop the cord through both pulley brackets and hooks. Slide the hook apparatus onto the length of cord that you’re threading through the pulley system. Take the loose end of this cord and bring it up and over the circular wheel of the pulley. Next, drag the length of cord horizontally so it attaches to the second pulley. Slide the second hook onto the cord, then loop the end of the rope up and over the circular wheel of this pulley bracket.[19]
Attach a heavy-duty adhesive hook to the wall. Pull off the backing paper from 1 side of the adhesive strip, then firmly press the sticky side of the strip to the wall. Next, remove the other section of backing paper from the adhesive. Take the back of the hook structure and press it firmly onto the sticky strip for several seconds to successfully set it up.[20]
Try choosing an adhesive hook with “utility” or “heavy-duty” on the label. While your pulley cord won’t be that heavy, you don’t want to use a flimsy hook.
Always follow the instructions on the hook’s packaging.
Tie any extra cord to the hook on the lower wall. Leave of cord dangling from the pulley, so you can securely lift and lower your bike from your storage area. Loop the extra cord around the wall hook, so you can unspool it whenever you need to access your bike. If you don’t leave enough slack for your pulley system, your bike hoist might not function properly.[21]
If you have more than 1 pulley system hooked up in your storage area, be sure to have separate wall hooks to prevent the cords from tangling.
Secure the hooks to the handlebars and bike seat. Take 1 hook and attach it beneath the back of your bike seat. Next, take the second hook and arrange it beneath the piping of your handlebars. Before you do anything else, check that these hooks are secure, and that they aren’t going to shift and separate from the bike.[22]
Ideally, your hooks should have a rubber seal. If your hooks are only made of metal, then they might scratch your handlebars.
Pull on the cord to lift up the bike. Tug your cord at a 45-degree angle so the safety brake on your pulley system is released. Continue pulling on the cord to raise the bike until it reaches the ceiling of your storage area. Once you’ve lifted the bike, release the cord and loop it around the designated wall hook.[23][Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Storing Bikes on Rubber Hooks
Rubber hooks
Electric drill
Drill bit
Screwdriver (optional)
Paper towel or wipe[Edit]Using a Pulley System
Pulley brackets
Stud finder (optional)
Measuring tape
Screws
Electric drill
Pulley cord
Pulley hooks
Wall hooks[Edit]References↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0Rp-T1Niftg&t=0m10s

↑ https://www.roadbikerider.com/bicycle-storage-with-bike-hooks-d3/

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=0m47s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0Rp-T1Niftg&t=0m28s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=1m2s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gv2ZVNpiJGU&t=0m28s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EeDrXaUbSuU&t=0m29s

↑ https://www.roadbikerider.com/bicycle-storage-with-bike-hooks-d3/

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0Rp-T1Niftg&t=1m56s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=gv2ZVNpiJGU&t=0m7s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fNI8_qjDewM&t=4m54s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=0m46s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=1m13s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=1m31s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=2m19s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=2m31s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=2m53s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=3m5s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=2qlK88gx9GU&t=3m12s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=PuaECYj84FA&t=0m13s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=kF32I8gENl4&t=4m51s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fNI8_qjDewM&t=4m54s

↑ https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fNI8_qjDewM&t=6m11s

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Today in History for 24th January 2020

Historical Events

1644 – Parliamentary army wins battle of Nantwich, Cheshire, English Civil War
1848 – James Marshall finds gold in Sutter’s Mill in Coloma, California
1862 – Romanian principality arises under King Alexander Cuza. Bucharest proclaimed its capital.
1924 – Russian city of St Petersburg renamed Leningrad (changed back in 1991)
1956 – 6th NBA All Star Game, Rochester War Memorial Coliseum, NY: West beats East, 108-94; MVP: Bob Pettit, St. Louis Hawks, C
2009 – Pope Benedict XVI rescinds the excommunications of four bishops consecrated without papal consent in 1988 by Archbishop Marcel Lefebvre.

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1779 – Elizabeth Alexeievna (Louise of Baden), Russian tsarina (d. 1826)
1907 – Alfonse Vranckx, Belgian lawyer/politician
1921 – Bernard J. Dwyer, American politician (Rep-D-NJ, 1981- 93), born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey (d. 1998)
1928 – Michel Serrault, French actor (Nelly and Monsieur Arnaud, La Cage aux Folles), born in Brunoy, France (d. 2007)
1943 – Subhash Ghai, Indian film director, born in Nagpur, India
1968 – Mark Burmester, Zimbabwean cricketer (Zimbabwe Test all-rounder in 3 Tests 1992), born in Durban, South Africa

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

772 – Stephen III/IV, Catholic Pope (768-72), dies. (b. 720)
1666 – Johann Andreas Herbst, composer, dies at 77
1904 – Franz Coenen, composer, dies at 77
1930 – Rebecca Latimer Felton, American writer and politician (first woman to serve as U.S. Senator (Georgia)), dies at 94
1962 – Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar, Turkish poet, novelist, recognized as one of the most important representatives of modernism in Turkish literature (A Mind at Peace, The Time Regulation Institute), dies of a heart attack at 60
2005 – June Bronhill, Australian singer (b. 1929)

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How to Get Rid of Bad Smells in Your Fridge

Over time, it’s natural for most refrigerators to build up a slightly unpleasant aroma. While the smell can be off-putting, it’s not doing any harm to your food itself. If you’d like to remove lingering food smells before they permanently soak into the interior of your fridge, start by throwing away any bad food. You can also place a deodorizer or 2—like coffee grounds and activated charcoal—on an upper shelf. To prevent bad smells in the first place, throw out food as soon as it begins to spoil, and always store food in airtight containers.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Removing Bad Food and Smells
Unplug your refrigerator from the wall before you begin cleaning it. Follow the power cable from the back of your fridge to the outlet where it’s plugged in, and pull the plug.[1] If you leave the fridge plugged in as you clean, you’ll find that your next electric bill is extremely high!
Some newer models of refrigerator have an “off” button. If yours does, you can just turn the fridge off rather than unplugging it.
Remove all of the food items from your fridge. Go through every storage area within your fridge—shelves, drawers, and door bins—and pull out all of the organic food items. Look closely at the food and, if anything is spoiled, rotten, or emitting a bad smell, throw it into the garbage. In most cases, bad smells in your fridge are caused by spoiled foods.[2]
Try to start and finish the entire job within 4 hours. The USDA warns that food left out for over 4 hours may spoil or become unsafe to eat.
Place any food you choose to keep in a cooler while you work. Depending on the amount of food you store in your fridge—and how long it takes to scrub out—unspoiled food could be sitting out for quite some time. To avoid ruining good food, place it in a cooler while you’re cleaning the fridge. If you keep the lid shut, the refrigerated food will keep itself cold.[3]
Add ice to the cooler if it will be out for over 60 minutes. This will keep the food well preserved.
Scrub the fridge walls and floor with a mixture of baking soda and water. Dissolve 1 cup (128 g) of baking soda into of warm water. Dip an ordinary dish sponge into this mixture, lightly wring it out, and scrub out the interior of the fridge. Wash the fridge walls, ceiling, and bottom. Take the time to soak, scrub, and remove any lingering food stains.[4]
If the mixture loses its potency or the sink fills up with food bits, throw out the batch and mix up a new one.
Take out and wash all shelves, bins, and other removable parts. Remove all of the components of the fridge that aren’t attached to the walls, including the vegetable drawers and the shelves themselves. Wash and rinse all of the parts with your baking soda mixture before thoroughly drying and reinstalling them.[5]
Also be sure to look underneath the vegetable bins. Sometimes bits of food and old water can accumulate beneath the bins and create a foul smell.
Clean any food scraps from the drip pan under the fridge. The drip pan is a thin plastic tray that clips into place beneath the bottom of the refrigerator. Remove the drip pan from beneath the doors, carefully pull it out and dump the contents. Then, dip your sponge into the baking soda mixture and scrub any food stains off of the drip pan before reinstalling it.[6]
Not all refrigerator models have a drip pan. If yours doesn’t, you can skip this step. Do take the time to scrub the bottom of the fridge, though.[Edit]Using Odor-Removers
Keep an open container of baking soda on a back shelf. Baking soda has no smell itself, but it’s great at absorbing and neutralizing other aromas. To get rid of odors in your fridge, open up a box of baking soda and store it on the back of the top shelf. When you notice a few unpleasant smells starting to emerge, toss that baking soda and replace it with another box.[7]
If you fridge smells especially bad and you’d like to absorb a great deal of odor at once, pour out a full box of baking soda across a baking sheet and place leave it in the refrigerator overnight. Then discard the baking soda.
Remove odors from your freezer with boiled apple cider vinegar. Combine apple cider vinegar and water at a 1:3 ratio. Pour the mixture into a saucepan and bring it to a boil on the stovetop. As soon as the mixture begins boiling, remove it from the heat and pour it into a heat-resistant glass or metal bowl. Place the bowl in your freezer, shut the door, and leave it for 4–6 hours. This should absorb foul smells from your freezer.[8]
After the 4–6 hours have passed, remove the vinegar mixture and pour it down the drain.
Once it’s been boiled, apple cider vinegar absorbs unpleasant odors and replaces them with a pleasant fruity smell.
Cover 2–3 shelves with coffee grounds if you have plenty of time. Coffee grounds can successfully absorb unpleasant odors, but they take a long time to work. If you can live without your fridge for a few days, try this method. Spread dry, fresh coffee grounds across 2–3 baking sheets. Place each sheet on a different level of your refrigerator. The smells should leave within 3–4 days.[9]
During this time, you’ll need to keep your food in a second refrigerator or in a few ice-filled coolers.
Once the 3–4 days have passed, dispose of the coffee grounds, wash the baking sheets, and put your food back into the fridge.
Set 2–3 baking sheets of unscented cat litter on different shelves. Coffee grounds can leave behind a slight coffee aroma in your fridge. If you’d like to absorb foul smells without leaving your fridge smelling like coffee, opt for cat litter instead. Spread a layer of clean litter in 2–3 shallow baking sheets and place the sheets on different shelves in your fridge. Leave the fridge running and empty with only the litter inside for 2–3 days to absorb any lingering smells.[10]
Purchase unscented cat litter at any pet store or large supermarket. Some home-improvement stores will also stock cat litter.
Let activated charcoal absorb bad odors if other methods fail. Fill 3–4 small cloth bags with about 1 cup (130 g) of loose activated charcoal. Then place the charcoal-filled bags on different shelves in your fridge.[11] Set the refrigerator temperature to low and leave the door closed as much as possible for several days. The smells in question should go away within 3–4 days.
Activated charcoal can be purchased from pet stores or drugstores.
Unlike with the coffee grounds method, you can use activated charcoal while your food is still in the fridge.[Edit]Preventing Bad Smells
Toss expired food weekly to prevent bad smells from accumulating. To prevent odors in the future, make a point to look in your fridge once a week or so and remove expired food. This preventative measure will keep foul smells from building up in the first place. It’s much easier to prevent bad odors in your fridge than it is to eliminate them.
Try looking right before you take out the trash. That way, you’ll be able to get the spoiled, smelly food out of your home as soon as you’ve noticed it.
Store fresh foods where they’re visible so they don’t spoil unnoticed. Fresh items like fruits and vegetables can easily go bad without your noticing if they’re tucked away in a seldom-opened veggie drawer or the back of a bottom shelf. Prevent this by storing them in a location where you’ll be able to see them daily. Then, if you notice any fresh foods starting to look a little past their prime, dispose of them immediately.[12]
For example, keep meat at the front of the top shelf, and keep fruits and veggies on a lower shelf where they’re easily visible.
Set the temperature in your fridge between . When kept in this temperature range, food will keep without going bad. Since it’s only when food spoils that it begins to smell, you’ll keep your fridge smelling fresh and clean as long as the temperature remains in this range. If the temperature in your fridge rises above , bacteria will begin to grow and the food will begin to smell.[13]
Were you to set the fridge temperature to or lower, of course, the food would freeze.
Keep leftover food in airtight containers to prevent it from smelling. If you leave food uncovered in your fridge or leave it in, for example, a cardboard takeout box, it’ll go bad quickly. The sooner food goes bad, the sooner it’ll begin to stink up your fridge. By keeping leftovers in a sealed airtight container, you’ll help them last longer and prevent foul smells.[14]
As an extra measure to keep food from spoiling in your fridge, label and date leftovers when you store them. Tear off a piece of masking tape and stick it on top of the airtight container and write, for example, “February 14; chicken parmesan.”[Edit]Video
[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Cooler
Ice
Baking soda
Warm tap water
Sponge
Coffee grounds
Cat litter
Apple cider vinegar
Activated charcoal
3–4 glass or metal bowls
2–3 baking sheets
Airtight containers
Pen
Masking tape[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
Regardless of which method(s) you choose, don’t put the food back into your refrigerator until the stench has cleared.
After cleaning the fridge, also clean the condiment bottles and containers of food before putting them back in. Sometimes bad smells can cling to them.
If you have to leave your fridge off or unplugged for an extended period of time—e.g., if you’re taking a multiple-month vacation—clean it, take all the food out, and leave the door propped open since a warm, closed fridge can start to smell bad.
Do not use charcoal briquettes in the place of activated charcoal. The 2 forms of charcoal cannot be substituted for one another.[Edit]Warnings
Never clean a cold glass shelf with hot water. Either allow it to come to room temperature or use lukewarm water. A sudden temperature change can shatter the glass.
Avoid using abrasive cleaning items (e.g., steel wool) to scrub refrigerator surfaces clean. These have the potential for scratching the refrigerator surfaces.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Make a Basement Smell Better
Clean a Refrigerator
Arrange Refrigerator Shelves
Clean a Microwave
Replace a Refrigerator Door Seal
Empty Your Refrigerator Before Traveling[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.clean-fridge.com/

↑ https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-get-rid-of-funky-refrigerator-smells/

↑ https://greenlivingideas.com/2012/01/09/natural-remedies-to-deodorize-refrigerator/

↑ https://www.consumerreports.org/refrigerators/how-to-get-rid-of-funky-refrigerator-smells/

↑ https://www.cnet.com/how-to/leftovers-arent-making-your-fridge-stink-its-the-fridge-itself/

↑ https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/05/how-to-get-rid-of-smell-odor-refrigerator.html

↑ https://www.cnet.com/how-to/leftovers-arent-making-your-fridge-stink-its-the-fridge-itself/

↑ http://www.clean-fridge.com

↑ http://www.clean-fridge.com/

↑ https://food.unl.edu/solving-odor-problems-your-refrigerator-or-freezer

↑ https://www.seriouseats.com/2016/05/how-to-get-rid-of-smell-odor-refrigerator.html

↑ https://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/6-quick-ways-get-rid-the-bad-smells-your-fridge.html

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/at-what-temperature-should-my-refrigerator-be-set-tips-from-the-kitchn-171174

↑ https://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/6-quick-ways-get-rid-the-bad-smells-your-fridge.html

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