How to Spiral Tie Dye

Tie dyeing is a great way to make a plain, white garment look more interesting and colorful. The most popular design is the spiral. The trick to getting the design is to twist the shirt into a disk, then wrap rubber bands around it. T-shirts are the most popular item to tie dye, but you may be able to use other items too, such as sarongs.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Tying and Soaking the Fabric
Get a white, 100% cotton T-shirt that you want to tie dye. It can be brand-new or an older shirt. If the shirt is brand-new, wash it first to remove any coatings that might prevent the dye from adhering. If it’s an older shirt, make sure that it’s clean. You can also use other items, such as sarongs and pillowcases as long as they’re white and 100% cotton.[1]
Don’t use colored items, or the dye won’t show up. The fabric must also be 100% cotton in order for the dye to adhere.
Items with large surface areas will work the best. Something like a pair of shorts or socks will be difficult to twist into a spiral.
Spread the shirt out on a smooth, flat surface. You won’t be dyeing on this surface, so it can be anything, as long as it’s flat and rigid. A table or a hardwood floor would work the best. Don’t work on carpet, grass, or concrete; the texture will create too much friction for the twisting part.
if you’re tie dyeing something else, then make sure that you spread it out flat as well.
Place a fork in the center of the shirt with the prongs pointing down. The fork should be perpendicular to the shirt and the surface that you’re working on.[2] Alternatively, pinch the center of the shirt between your thumb and index finger. This will form the center of your spiral.For a more unique design, pinch elsewhere on the shirt. For example, you could pinch the top-right corner or the bottom-left corner.
Use the fork to twist the shirt into a disk. Twirl the fork between your fingers until the shirt starts to gather into a spiral. Once you’ve twisted the shirt as much as you can, use your hands to finish tucking any loose bits of fabric against the bundle.[3]This is a little like winding spaghetti around the prongs of a fork.
You can twist the shirt clockwise or counterclockwise.
If you pinched the fabric with your fingers, simply twist your hand like turning a key. You’ll have to re-pinch and adjust your hand after each twist.
Wrap 3 to 4 rubber bands around the disk. Wrap the first 2 rubber bands around the spiraled disk to make a cross shape. Add 1 or 2 more rubber bands to make the bundle more secure. Make sure that all of the rubber bands meet in the middle.[4]Space the rubber bands evenly, like the numbers on a clock, or just wrap them around the bundle randomly.
If the bundle feels loose, add a few more rubber bands.[Edit]Preparing the Soda Ash and Dye
Put on a pair of plastic gloves and a dust mask. Soda ash and dye can irritate skin and cause allergic reactions, so put those gloves on. The fine particles in soda ash and powdered dyes can also irritate your lungs, so a dust mask would also be a good idea.[5]Not all fabric dyes require soda ash. Double-check the instructions on the dye package.
It would be a good idea to put on an old set of clothes or an apron. This way, you won’t risk accidentally staining your clothes.
Work outside, if possible. If you can’t, cover your work surface with a plastic tablecloth or several layers of newspaper.
Mix 1 cup (598 g) of soda ash with of warm water. Pour of warm water into a large bucket, then stir in 1 cup (598 g) of soda ash. The soda ash is the magic ingredient that will set the dye into the fabric without the use of heat or constant soaking.[6]Once you add the T-shirt, the water level will rise, so make sure that the bucket is big enough. Something that can hold would work.
Choose your desired colors of fiber reactive dyes. These dyes are wonderful for tie dyeing because you don’t need heat to activate them. You also don’t need to leave the fabric in the dye for long periods of time. This makes it easy to apply multiple colors at once.[7]
You can get fiber reactive dyes online. Fabric stores and craft stores also sell them, but typically in kits.
Fiber reactive dyes come in powdered form, but not all powdered dyes are fiber reactive. Read the label!
How many colors you choose is up to you. Most people stick with 2 colors, but you can use anywhere between 1 and 4 colors.
Mix the dye with the amount of water recommended on the package. Each brand of dye will require a different amount of water. If your fiber reactive dye came in a plastic squeeze bottle, you’ll most likely have to fill the bottle to the fill line with water. Again, read the instructions.[8]
If your dye came in a packet, mix the dye in a jar first, then transfer it into a plastic squeeze bottle.
Some dyes can be mixed ahead of time and stored indefinitely while others need to be used immediately. Read the instructions on your package of dye.[Edit]Soaking and Dyeing the Fabric
Soak the shirt in the soda ash solution for 10 to 20 minutes. Dunk the shirt into the soda ash solution, then squeeze it to ensure that it’s thoroughly soaked. Leave it in the bucket for 10 to 20 minutes.[9]
If the shirt floats in the water, it’s not soaked through. Squeeze it some more, or allow it to soak longer.
You can remove the dust mask at this point since the soda ash and dye powders are dissolved. You should keep the gloves and old clothes/apron on, however.
Take the shirt out and squeeze out the excess soda ash solution. After this, you won’t need the soda ash solution again, so dump it out. If you’re dyeing more shirts, however, leave it in the bucket and soak the rest of your desired items.[10]You can pour the soda ash solution down the drain. It won’t harm the pipes. In fact, it may even clear out any clogs!
Use the squeeze bottles to apply the dye to the front of the disk. Use whatever pattern you like. Most people prefer to use 1 color per section. Some people like to apply the colors randomly with multiple colors per section. Make sure that you stick the nozzle into the creases and folds, however; otherwise, the dye won’t penetrate.[11]Each space between 2 rubber bands counts as 1 section.
Work on top of a surface that can get dirty or stained. An old baking sheet covered with plastic wrap would work great.
Flip the disk over and apply the dye to the other side. Use the same colors and patterns as you did for the front, or change them up for a more unique design. Once you are done, pour the rest of the dye down the drain.[12]You may be able to save the dye for later. Each brand is different, however, so read the label to find out whether or not you can store it for later use.[Edit]Setting and Rinsing the Dye
Place the shirt into a plastic bag for 24 hours. Use a resealable bag, such as a Ziploc bag. If you can only get a plain plastic bag, tie it shut instead. Leave the shirt in the bag for 24 hours so that the dye can set.[13]Don’t untie the shirt before you put it into the bag.
Place the bag on top of a tray or a larger plastic bag in case the dye leaks. This will protect your work surface against stains.
Remove the shirt from the bag with gloved hands. Put the plastic gloves back on your hands, then take the shirt out of the bag. Do not take the rubber bands off; leave them on.[14]If you take the rubber bands off now, you risk getting dye onto the white areas of the shirt and ruining the tie dye effect.
Rinse the shirt with cool water until the water runs clear. How long you rinse the shirt for depends on the brand and colors of dye that you used. Some will take a lot longer to rinse than others. Keep your gloves on for this step as the dye may still stain your hands.[15]
Remove the rubber bands, then rinse the shirt again. If you can’t pull the rubber bands, cut them off instead. Shake the shirt out so that it’s smooth, then rinse it again to get the rest of the dye out. Be sure to use cool water, not warm.[16]Remember to wear your plastic gloves so that you don’t get dye on your hands!
You need to rinse the shirt twice because some of the dye was trapped inside the spiral.
Wash the shirt in the washing machine. There will still be some dye left in the shirt, so it would be best to wash it separate from the rest of your laundry. If that’s not possible, add a dye-setting solution (e.g.: Synthrapol) into your laundry. This will prevent the dye from staining the rest of your laundry.[17]Alternatively, wash the shirt with similar colors. You can also wash it with black clothing; the dye won’t show up on that.
Stick with a “cool” or “cold” water setting. It is safe for all fabrics and won’t fade the dye.
Allow the shirt to dry. Hang the shirt up in the sun or use a clothes dryer. The heat from the dryer would actually help set the dye into the fabric better, but be aware that it may also cause the shirt to shrink a little!
Once the shirt is dry, it’s ready to wear!
If you are using a clothes dryer, you can dry the shirt with other items. The color should not transfer to other garments.[Edit]Tips
Wash the shirt separately from the rest of your laundry for the first 3 or 4 washes to minimize bleeding. Alternatively, wash it with like or black colors.
If you can’t get a white shirt, consider using the reverse tie dye technique with bleach and a colored shirt.[Edit]Warnings
Don’t reuse measuring cups and stirring utensils for food or cooking. Washing alone won’t remove the contaminants from the dye and soda ash.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
100% cotton white T-shirt
Rubber bands
Bucket
Soda ash
Fiber reactive dyes
Plastic squeeze bottles
Water
Fork
Plastic gloves
Dust mask
Old clothes or apron
Plastic resealable bags
Plastic tablecloth or newspaper
[Edit]References↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ https://www.thesprucecrafts.com/spiral-tie-dye-t-shirt-1254208

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/how-to-tie-dye/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/how-to-tie-dye/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/how-to-tie-dye/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/how-to-tie-dye/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

↑ http://diy4tiedye.com/tie-dye-patterns-spiral/

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Today in History for 26th January 2020

Historical Events

1850 – 1st German language daily newspaper in US published, NYC
1857 – Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville delivers his design for a phonautograph, which created visual images of sound, to the French Academy
1900 – Henrik Ibsen’s “Naar vi Dode Vaaguer” premieres in Stuttgart
1907 – 1st US federal corrupt election practices law passed
1948 – Australian Championships Women’s Tennis: Nancye Wynne Bolton beats Marie Toomey 6-3, 6-1 for 4th straight Australian single title
2013 – 10 people are killed and 20 are injured by a suicide bombing in Kunduz, Afghanistan

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1541 – Florent Chrestien, French writer (d. 1596)
1786 – Benjamin Robert Haydon, Plymouth, painter (Waiting for The Times)
1852 – Frederick Corder, composer
1921 – Frantisek Chaun, composer
1949 – Jonathan Carroll, American author, born in New York
1977 – Vince Carter [Vinsanity], American basketball player who famously made “Le dunk de la mort” (the Dunk of Death), born in Daytona Beach, Florida

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Famous Deaths

1885 – Edward Davy, English inventor (b. 1806)
1950 – Betsy van den Arend, Dutch [Betje], actress (Miss Hobbs), dies at 78
1967 – Kenneth Thomson, American character actor (Broadway Melody, Little Giant), dies of emphysema at 68
1968 – Merrill C. Meigs, American newspaper publisher (b. 1883)
1990 – Bob Gerard, British racing driver (b. 1914)
2000 – Don Budge, American tennis player (6 Grand Slam singles titles, Grand Slam 1938), dies of cardiac arrest at 84

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How to Clean Your Hair Without Water

Whether you don’t have access to a sink or shower or you just need a quick clean, there are several ways to help clean your hair without using water. Sprinkle baby powder on your hair to absorb the oil, or dab your hair with rubbing alcohol to dry out greasy locks. Dry shampoo is always a great alternative to washing your hair when you’re in a pinch, too. If you don’t have access to any of these fixes, try hiding your dirty hair by styling it with something like a headband, ponytail, or braids.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Absorbing Oil and Dirt in Your Hair
Sprinkle your hair with baby powder to absorb oil on your roots. If you happen to have baby powder at home, this is a great way to mask extra oil and grime in your hair without washing it. Either sprinkle the baby powder right onto your roots, or use a clean makeup brush to swipe it over your roots instead. Wait a couple minutes before massaging it into your hair.[1]
Apply the baby powder using 2-3 shakes to avoid sprinkling too much on your hair. If your hair is longer or super thick, you may need 3-5 shakes of the container to cover your hair.
Spray dry shampoo on your hair for a quick fix. Dry shampoo is great for absorbing oil when you don’t have time to wash your hair thoroughly. Spray the dry shampoo at least away from your head and let it sit for a few minutes before massaging it into your hair.[2]
Brush through your hair after you’ve let the dry shampoo sit to help distribute it evenly throughout your hair.
Look for dry shampoo in your favorite brand or scent at your local grocery or big box store.
Apply rubbing alcohol to your roots to fix greasy hair. Soak a cotton ball in rubbing alcohol and dab it onto your roots gently. The rubbing alcohol will help soak up any oil and grease so that your hair looks cleaner.[3]
Alcohol dries out your hair, so use a leave-in conditioner on your hair after using this method to add moisture back to your hair.
Try out a foam shampoo for a more thorough cleaning. Foam shampoos are known for helping clean dirty hair instead of just absorbing excess oil. Apply the foam shampoo to dry hair and watch it foam up, using as much as is recommended on the bottle. Use a clean towel to wipe the foam off of your hair to reveal cleaner locks without using water.[4]
Foam shampoos are great for people with curly hair because it enhances your natural texture.
Look for a foam shampoo at your local big box store or online.
Dab blotting paper over your hair to absorb oil quickly. The same blotting papers you might use to absorb oil on your face can be used to absorb the oil in your hair as well. Take a blotting paper and dab it on your hair starting at your roots to absorb the oil, using multiple papers if necessary.[5]
Blotting papers can be found at your local drugstore, grocery store, or big box store.
Mix cornstarch with cocoa powder together as a dry shampoo alternative. The cornstarch will absorb oils and unwanted scents from your hair, while the cocoa powder can be mixed in if you have darker hair so the starch doesn’t stand out as much. Combine of cornstarch with of cocoa powder. Mix them together thoroughly before sprinkling it over your roots.[6]
For an easy sprinkling process, mix the two ingredients in a jar and poke holes in the top for the mixture to come out.
Massage arrowroot into your hair for a natural oil absorbent. Start with of powder or a little less, sprinkling it into your palm. Massage the arrowroot powder into your hair starting at your roots and working your way down the length of your hair to absorb the oil.[7]
You can find arrowroot at some local grocery stores, in big box stores, or online.
It’s best to use a damp washcloth to remove the excess powder by swiping the washcloth or towel over your hair.
Swipe a dryer sheet over your hair to clean it while adding freshness. You might have used a dryer sheet to get rid of static in your hair before, but it can also be used to revive your hair if it hasn’t been washed in a while. Rub a new dryer sheet over your hair gently, or press it down into a brush and brush over your hair to ensure each strand is swiped by the dryer sheet.[8]
The dryer sheet will leave your hair smelling fresher.[Edit]Styling Your Hair to Hide Oil
Tie your hair up in a ponytail to get dirty hair out of your face. If you’re tired of your oily hair hanging down around your face, brush through it a couple times before pulling it into a ponytail. Since your hair is greasy, it’ll be easier to get a smooth ponytail, and you can even add a colorful scrunchie to finish off the look.[9]
Pull your hair into a high ponytail or one right at the back of your head.
Use a headband to hide your dirty roots. If you’re pressed for time and need a quick fix, throw on a headband that matches your outfit. This will make your hair look styled while keeping your dirty hair out of your face.[10]
Pick out a plastic headband with teeth to keep your hair pulled back, or opt for a fabric headband to hide more of your hair.
Clip back your hair into a twist to hide stringy hair. If you have dirty strands of hair near your face and want them out of the way, create a twist with the front section of each side. Use a barrette or bobby pin to clip back each of these two sections, keeping stringy, oily hair out of your face.[11]
Create the twist as long or as short as you’d like, making sure it’s secured by a pin so it doesn’t come loose.
Put your hair up in a half bun for a stylish fix. Pull back the top layer of your hair into a bun on top of your head, securing it with an elastic or hair tie. This will help hide dirty roots and keep your hair out of your face so it doesn’t get even dirtier.[12]
If your hair still looks stringy after putting half of it up in a bun, consider throwing all of your hair into a simple bun on top of your head.
Braid your hair to disguise dirty hair completely. Create two Dutch braids in your hair, French braid your hair, or even make one simple braid going down the back of your head. The tighter the braid you create, the better you’ll hide any greasy or oily locks of hair.[13]
Brush through your hair before braiding it to ensure your braids are sleek and unknotted.
Secure your braids with small hair ties so they don’t come undone.
Wear a hat to cover up your hair if it’s too short to be styled. If you don’t have time to style your hair or your hair is super short, throw on your favorite hat to cover up greasy roots. This could be a baseball cap, beret, beanie, or even a bandana to cover the top of your head.[14]
Choose a hat that matches the colors in your outfit.[Edit]References↑ https://www.thesouthafrican.com/lifestyle/how-to-keep-your-hair-clean-without-water-in-the-drought/

↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/style-beauty/beauty/a25385624/how-to-use-dry-shampoo/

↑ https://www.thesouthafrican.com/lifestyle/how-to-keep-your-hair-clean-without-water-in-the-drought/

↑ https://www.self.com/story/no-rinse-shampoo-pros-and-cons

↑ https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/greasy-hair-products

↑ https://www.insider.com/how-dry-shampoo-is-ruining-your-hair-2017-10

↑ https://thegreenparent.co.uk/articles/read/5-surprising-beauty-uses-for-arrowroot

↑ https://www.glamour.com/story/heres-one-great-reason-to-add

↑ https://www.thesouthafrican.com/lifestyle/how-to-keep-your-hair-clean-without-water-in-the-drought/

↑ https://uk.hair.com/hair-styling/easy-hairstyles/hair-in-a-hurry

↑ http://orientalhairsolutions.com/blog/2018/05/04/tips-to-clean-your-hair-without-washing/

↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/uk/beauty-hair/hair/a48631/how-to-hide-greasy-hair/

↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/uk/beauty-hair/hair/a48631/how-to-hide-greasy-hair/

↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/uk/beauty-hair/hair/a48631/how-to-hide-greasy-hair/

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