How to Enjoy the Super Bowl when You’re Not a Football Fan

The Super Bowl, played between the top two NFL teams in the U.S., is held every February. Often it’s the country’s most-watched event of the year. If you’re not a big American football fan, however, you may find yourself dreading the day as it approaches. Fortunately there’s a solution to this problem. By learning to enjoy Super Bowl Sunday in your own way, you can look forward to the game just as much as the biggest fan. Here are some ideas that might help.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Enjoying the Food and Friends
Head to a party for the full Super Bowl experience. Just because you don’t like football doesn’t mean you should keep yourself from the festivities! If your friends or family are throwing a Super Bowl party, you can go just to talk to the other guests and eat some great snacks.
If you don’t know anyone throwing a party, host one yourself! Invite a few friends, and ask each person to bring some easy-to-share food for a low-key party.
Bring food to the party. Easy finger foods like chips and dip or cookies are the best dishes to take along to a Super Bowl party. You could even take the ingredients to the party and make your dish there. That will diminish the time you have to spend in front of the TV. Some great snack options include:[1]
Guacamole and a bag of tortilla chips.
A veggie platter with carrots, celery, broccoli, cauliflower and dip.
Hummus with baked pita chips.
Football-shaped sugar cookies or cupcakes.
Spend lots of time in front of the food spread. If you’re not interested in the game, don’t force yourself to crowd around the TV with the diehards–unless you’re eager to learn! There will be plenty of people you can talk to in the back by the food and drinks.
If there’s no one else near you for a second, you can still look occupied by simply eating what’s on your plate, or turning around for more food.
Talk to other people who aren’t into football. There will probably be other people at the party who don’t care about the game either, whether they’re not interested in the sport or simply aren’t fans of the teams playing. They’re likely to hang out near the back or around the food. You can chat with them about the game, the food, the commercials or anything that’s going on in their life!
For example, you can say something general like, “This game is crazy so far.” Depending on their answer, you’ll be able to tell if they’re not a big football fan or just don’t care about the teams.
If you know they’re not into football, make casual conversation about whatever you want. You could say something simple like, “How was your week?” or mention something about the party, like “These quesadillas are so good. Have you tried them?”
Sit at the end of the couch to make a quick getaway. Try to pick a seat near the edge of the viewing area. This will make it easier to escape if you get bored. If you sit near the middle of the gathering, you might get caught up in conversation or feel stuck between others who are talking to each other through you. [2]
If you do end up sitting in a good viewing spot, try to pay attention to the game. It could annoy other guests if you have a prime seat for watching the game but you’re on your phone the whole time![Edit]Entertaining Yourself with Commercials and Games
Play “Pick a Player” to have someone to root for in the game. Write the names of the key players on both teams on small slips of paper, one player per slip. Mix them around in a bowl. Ask everyone to contribute a dollar (or more) to play, and pass the bowl around, asking each person to pick one slip of paper. The person who draws the MVP of the game (announced during the post-game celebration) wins the pot![3]
Look up the key players online before the game, or ask a friend who is familiar with the teams.
It’s best to draw names before the game starts, but since your guests are picking at random, it’s okay to get a late start, too.
Have a game of “Pass the Cup” to get invested in each play. Ask one guest to start by putting a dollar (or any amount you want) into an empty cup and calling out a football play, such as “field goal.” If the very next play is not a field goal, they pass the cup to the next person, who contributes the same amount of money and again passes it on if a field goal isn’t attempted on the next play. The person holding the cup when the named play actually occurs gets the money! [4]
The winner of that round gets to start the game again by choosing the next play, such as “touchdown,” “interception,” or “first down,” and putting in the first dollar.
Don’t worry if you’re not familiar with many football terms. Everyone else will be watching the game closely and will definitely let you know when the named play happens!
If you don’t want to play with money, you can use candy, chips, or cookies.
Watch the commercial breaks for funny advertisements. For a lot of people Super Bowl ads are the best part of the day. If you just can’t get into the game, relax and chat with other guests until the commercials come on. There are lots of time outs and breaks during football games, so you’ll never have to wait long.
Play Super Bowl ad bingo to make commercials even more interesting. Look online for a “Super Bowl ad bingo” card and print out one for each of the guests before the game. When a commercial comes on, watch closely and mark off any square that names the type of commercial that’s played. Get a small prize, like a cupcake, or have each guest contribute a dollar for the winner. [5]
You can also make your own bingo boards. Watch some Super Bowl ads from the last few years to get an idea of some popular themes. For example, there could be squares for “puppies,” “car crashes,” or “a character crying.”
Make sure that the squares are arranged differently on each board so that everyone doesn’t hit bingo at the same time!
Enjoy the halftime show for mid-game entertainment. The Super Bowl halftime show is a huge performance, usually starring pop and rock stars that everyone has heard of and can enjoy. Grab a snack as the first half winds down and get a good seat around the TV. Other guests often use this time for a bathroom break, so there should be plenty of room for you!
Keep watching in case guest stars pay a surprise visit on stage (which sometimes happens!)
Tune in for the Puppy Bowl before the game. If you’re looking for something to do before the game, and if your host can get Animal Planet on TV, take a look at the Puppy Bowl. It features adorable puppies rolling around on a mini football field, as well as a “kitty halftime show” and a human “referee” to maintain a little order. The show is cute and funny, and a great way to perk up your mood before the game.[6][Edit]Learning about Football
Look up basic football rules if you’re unfamiliar with the game. If you don’t know the rules of football but want to follow some of what’s going on, look up a few basic points online. You won’t be an expert right away, but at least you’ll be able to understand some of the plays. This can also keep you entertained and focused on the game. Challenge yourself to understand the major rules before the game’s over. [7]
For example, you’ll want to know that the most important player on a team is the quarterback, who throws passes down the field or hands the ball off to the running back.
The aim of the game is to get the ball into the endzone to score a touchdown, earning 6 points. A team can also kick the ball between two upright posts, scoring a field goal and getting three points.
Ask a good friend questions about the game. If you don’t mind owning up to the fact that you don’t know much about football, you can just ask a friend or another guest to explain a few key points to you. Ask someone who’s not too invested in the game and who won’t mind taking their eyes off the screen for a few minutes to explain different points to you.
Don’t be nervous or embarrassed to ask questions. Your friend will probably be happy to share their knowledge and help you get enthusiastic about the game.
Watch how other people react, and copy them to blend in. If you don’t want to learn the complicated rules but would rather not stick out at a party full of football fans, just pick a team to cheer for. Look around the party to see who’s supporting that team, and copy their reactions to different plays.
Avoid cheering too hard, or people might ask you questions about the game that you won’t know how to answer. Keep your reactions relaxed and slightly indifferent, like you’re just a casual fan.
For example, if your team scores a touchdown, just smile and clap, but don’t pretend more enthusiasm than you really feel.
If someone does ask you why you’re pulling for a certain team, just say, “I don’t care much either way, but I just wanted to cheer for someone.”
Know a few key players from each team (and their jersey numbers). Listen to the announcers, and notice the players they talk about the most. They’ll be the players on the screen most, too. You can also use your phone or computer to quickly look up the most important players on either team. You can focus on these players when they’re on the field, giving you something to concentrate on when the rest of the field gets confusing. [8]
You can also mention these players in conversation to show your working knowledge of the game. Keep your comments vague, like “Johnson is all over the field today,” or “No one can catch Simmons!”
The key offensive players will probably be the quarterbacks from both teams, the running backs, and a wide receiver or tight end.
From the defensive side, key players are often linebackers, cornerbacks, or safeties.[Edit]Tips
If you don’t want to watch the game at all, invite other friends who aren’t football fans to a non-Super Bowl party. If you aren’t a big football fan, chances are that some of your friends aren’t either. A few days before the game, tell them you’re hosting a party for people who don’t want to watch the Super Bowl, and invite them to bring over food or games to play. Getting together with friends will help you avoid feeling left out of Super Bowl celebrations, and you’ll have a better time than you would at a Super Bowl party!
If you really dislike football, preoccupy yourself with other things during the first three quarters of the game. Have someone call you in for the fourth quarter, and console yourself with the knowledge that you’ll be wasting only about 30 or 45 minutes of your life. Maybe you’ll see some good commercials.[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.foodnetwork.com/holidays-and-parties/packages/50-super-bowl-snacks

↑ http://www.lifeandstylemag.com/posts/super-bowl-2017-guide-124034

↑ https://www.punchbowl.com/p/super-bowl-party-games

↑ https://www.punchbowl.com/p/super-bowl-party-games

↑ http://www.lifeandstylemag.com/posts/super-bowl-2017-guide-124034

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15SdPnof0FY

↑ http://www.lifeandstylemag.com/posts/super-bowl-2017-guide-124034

↑ http://www.lifeandstylemag.com/posts/super-bowl-2017-guide-124034

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Today in History for 1st February 2020

Historical Events

1908 – King Carlos I of Portugal and his heir, Prince Luis Filipe are assassinated by Republican sympathizers in Terreiro do Paco, Lisbon
1953 – WEEK TV channel 25 in Peoria, IL (NBC) begins broadcasting
1959 – Heiss sisters go 1-2 in US women’s Figure Skating C’ships; defending champion Carol wins from Nancy; David Jenkins wins his third straight men’s title
1981 – Australian cricket captain Greg Chappell sensationally instructs younger brother Trevor to bowl underarm to Brian McKechnie with NZ needing 6 from last ball to tie 3rd World Series ODI in Melbourne; Australia wins by 6
1991 – US Air and Skywest Fairchild jet collide at LA Airport killing 32
2004 – 251 people are trampled to death and 244 injured in a stampede at the Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia.

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1819 – Henry Lawrence Eustis, American Brigadier General (Union Army), born in Boston, Massachusetts (d. 1885)
1922 – Renata Tebaldi, lyric soprano, born in Pesaro, Italy (d. 2004)
1936 – G H Blake, Principal (Collingwood College, Durham U)
1964 – Dwayne Goettel, Canadian musician
1964 – Linus Roache, English actor, born in Manchester, United Kingdom
1968 – Lisa Marie Presley Keough Jackson, daughter of Elvis, born in Memphis, Tennessee

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Famous Deaths

1743 – Giuseppe Ottavio Pitoni, Italian composer, dies at 85
1747 – Jacobus E J Capitein, Dutch slave/vicar/merchant, dies
1877 – Joseph-Leon Gatayes, composer, dies at 71
1991 – Annie van Ommeren-Averink [Hanna Jacoba of Ommeren-Averink], Dutch politician (CPN), dies
1997 – Peter Morris, historian of France, dies at 50
2010 – Jack Brisco, American pro wrestler (NWA World Heavyweight Champion 1973–75), dies from complications of open heart surgery at 68

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How to Make Mango Jam

Making jam is a great way to capture the natural sweetness and delicate flavor of mangoes. Chop the mangoes into small pieces and cook them with lots of sugar, lemon juice, and pectin. You can even customize your mango jam to come up with completely unique flavor combinations. Once the jam is as thick as you like, transfer it to sterilized jars and enjoy the jam on toast, waffles, or pancakes.

[Edit]Ingredients
[Edit]Basic Mango Jam
6 to 7 large mangoes
1 cup (200 g) of sugar
of lemon juice
2 tablespoons (25 g) of powdered pectinMakes 2 cups (650 g) of jam

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Cooking Basic Mango Jam
Slice the flesh from 6 or 7 large mangoes. Rinse the mangoes and put them on a cutting board. Hold a mango against the board and carefully cut down 1 side of it. Try to cut as close to the seed in the center, so you’re able to remove the most fruit. Then, slice down the other side of the mango. Scoop the flesh from both pieces and chop it into pieces.[1]
Use a small knife to trim the flesh around the seed itself.
You should get around 4 cups (660 g) of mango pieces.
Put the mango pieces in a pot with sugar, lemon juice, and pectin. Place the chopped mango in a large pot on the stove. Add 1 cup (200 g) of sugar, of lemon juice, and 2 tablespoons (25 g) of powdered pectin.[2]The pectin helps the jam set up. If you prefer a looser jam, you can leave the pectin out.
Stir the mixture and cook it over low heat until the sugar dissolves. Stir well so the mango pieces are coated with the sugar. Continue to stir the mixture every few minutes until the sugar dissolves and becomes liquidy.[3]It should take about 3 to 4 minutes for the sugar to dissolve.
Bring the jam to a boil over medium-high heat. Turn the burner up so the liquid becomes syrupy and starts to bubble vigorously. Stir the jam occasionally to prevent it from sticking to the pot or boiling over.[4]It’s important to use a large pot so the jam doesn’t bubble over as it cooks.
Cook the mango jam until it reaches . Clip a candy thermometer to the side of the pot or occasionally insert an instant-read thermometer into the jam to see if the jam has reached the setting temperature of . Stir the jam occasionally as it bubbles and thickens.[5]
Skim off foam that floats to the top of the jam and discard it since becomes rubbery if you leave it in the jam.
Spoon the jam into sterilized jars. Get out 2 sterilized half-pint jars and place a funnel on a jar. Carefully spoon the mango jam into the jar and leave headspace. Place a sterilized lid on the jar and screw on a band until it’s finger tight.[6]Although you can soften the lids in hot water before pressing them on the jars, you don’t have to in order to get a good seal.
Process the jars or store them in the refrigerator. For long-term storage, place the jars in a water bath so they’re covered by at least of water. Boil the jars for 10 minutes and then set the jars aside until the jars are at room temperature. If you don’t want to can the jam, put the jars in the refrigerator and use them within 3 weeks.[7]
If you process the jam, store the jars at room temperature for up to 1 year. Press down on the lid to check that the seal doesn’t pop back up before you open the jar and eat the jam.[Edit]Trying Variations
Swap half of the mango for peaches or nectarines. Although pure mango jam is delicious, it’s also fun to add another fruit to the jam. Use half of the mango called for in the recipe and replace the other half with peeled peaches, nectarines, or stonefruit. Mango also pairs well with any of these fruits:[8]
Strawberries
Papaya
Pineapple
Raspberries
Plums
Substitute honey or alternative sweetener for the granulated sugar. If you don’t want to use white sugar, add as much of your favorite sweetener as you like. Try honey, agave, or a low-calorie sweetener. Keep in mind that since sugar acts as a preservative and you’re leaving it out, you’ll need to refrigerate the mango jam and use it sooner.[9]
Store jars of the mango jam in the fridge for up to 3 weeks.
Add 1 teaspoon (2 g) of your favorite ground spice for a unique flavor. Customize your mango jam by stirring in dried spice halfway through the cooking time. You can use a single spice or a combination that equals 1 teaspoon (2 g). Consider using any of these spices or seasonings:[10]
Cardamom
Cinnamon
Ginger
Nutmeg
Vanilla paste
Leave out the sugar and pectin to make a loose mango spread. If you want the natural sweetness of the mango to really come out, don’t add any sugar, honey, or sweetener. Cook the mango with of water over medium heat until the mango breaks down and thickens.[11]
If you’d like smoother spread, push the mango spread through a fine-mesh strainer set over a bowl.
Because there’s no added sweetener to the spread, store it in the refrigerator and use it within 2 weeks.[Edit]Tips
If you can’t find fresh mangoes to use, buy frozen mangoes that have already been peeled and chopped. Thaw them overnight in the refrigerator before making the jam.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Measuring cups and spoons
Knife and cutting board
Large pot
Spoon
Small plate
Candy thermometer or instant-read thermometer
Funnel
Jars with lids[Edit]Related wikiHows
Make Dried Apricot Jam
Make Rose Petal Jam
Make Red Raspberry Jam
Make Simple and Fresh Strawberry Jam
Make Passionfruit Jam
Make Peach Jam[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cut-a-mango-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-166290

↑ https://www.kawalingpinoy.com/mango-jam/

↑ https://www.kawalingpinoy.com/mango-jam/

↑ https://www.washingtonpost.com/recipes/mango-jam/14639/

↑ https://www.washingtonpost.com/recipes/mango-jam/14639/

↑ https://practicalselfreliance.com/mango-jam/

↑ https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_07/storing_jams.html

↑ https://www.food.com/recipe/papaya-and-mango-jam-12688

↑ http://www.scratchingcanvas.com/healthy-spicy-mango-jam-no-sugar-no/

↑ https://www.happyandharried.com/2016/10/19/mango-saffron-cardamom-jam/

↑ https://www.weelittlevegans.com/mango-turmeric-ginger-fruit-spread/

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