How to Heal Dry Cracked Hands

If you’ve been washing your hands more than usual to keep germs at bay, you’ve probably noticed the skin on your hands getting dry. Over time, you might wind up with chapped or cracked hands. You definitely don’t want to stop washing your hands, but luckily, there are lots of remedies that can help! If the problem is mild, you might want to start with natural remedies (some of which you may already have around the house). If your hands are severely dry, or if the skin is cracking, you may need to use commercial products or talk to your doctor about stronger treatments.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using Natural Remedies
Apply olive or coconut oil to your hands. Olive and coconut oil are great natural moisturizers. They can also help to heal any cracks or cuts in your hands due to dryness. Apply a generous amount of olive or coconut oil to your hands. Then, rub in the oil well and let it dry. Re-apply the olive or coconut oil as necessary.[1]
If you want to lock the moisture of the oil into your skin, put small plastic bags over your hands once the oil has been applied. Clean wool socks or cloth gloves would also work well. Keep them on for 30 minutes or overnight. Doing this will lock the moisture of the oil into your hands as the oil dries.
Use shea butter on your hands. Shea butter is another good natural remedy for hands that are in desperate need of moisturizing. Apply the shea butter to your hands and let the butter seep into your skin. You can apply the shea butter to your hands as needed throughout the day.[2]
You can buy shea butter online or at your local health food store.
Soak your hands in milk and oats. The lactic acid in milk acts as a natural exfoliator. The amino acids and silica in oats are good for hydrating your skin. Combine one part milk with one part rolled oats in a bowl big enough to fit your hands. Then, place your hands in the milk and oats. Let your hands soak for 10-15 minutes.[3]
After 10-15 minutes, gently rinse your hands off in lukewarm water. Your hands should feel soft and less dry.[Edit]Applying Commercial Products
Use vaseline on your hands. Vaseline, or petroleum jelly, is great for hydrating your skin and locking in moisture. It can also help to heal cracked skin. Apply a generous amount of vaseline on your hands and let the vaseline dry. Put more vaseline on your hands, as needed, to keep them soft and hydrated.[4]
If your hands are really cracked and dry, apply the vaseline on and then put plastic bags or cloth gloves on your hands. Leave the bags or gloves on overnight. You should wake up with softer hands.
Get a hand cream with natural ingredients. Hand creams will provide a thicker protective barrier for your hands than hand lotions. Look for hand cream that does not contain any chemicals, dyes, fragrance, or preservatives. These ingredients can irritate your skin more and make it even dryer. Instead, go for a hand cream that contains natural ingredients like coconut oil, shea butter, and oats.[5]
You can buy hand cream that is all-natural online or at your local drugstore.
Try antibiotic ointment or cream. If your skin is irritated and dry, try applying over the counter antibiotic ointment or cream like Bacitracin or A&D ointment on your hands. You can also apply the ointment then put on cotton gloves and wear them overnight. Keep these gloves in a plastic bag as you will use them over and over if you have to deal with dry, cracked, irritated hands often.
Speak to your doctor about a prescription hand cream. If your dry, cracked hands are really bad and do not get better with over-the-counter remedies, you may need prescription hand cream. Talk to your doctor about getting a prescription for hand cream to treat the issue.[6]
Sometimes dry, cracked hands that do not heal with home remedies or over-the-counter creams are a symptom of a skin issue that needs medical treatment, such as eczema.[Edit]Caring for Your Hands
Wash your hands with mild, natural soap and warm water. When you wash your hands, avoid using harsh cleaning agents that contain dyes, artificial ingredients, or fragrances. Instead, go for mild soap that contains natural ingredients like olive oil, lemon, or shea butter. Use warm water, rather than hot water, as hot water can dry out your hands.[7]
If you find you have to put your hands in hot water often, such as when you wash dishes, wear rubber gloves to protect your hands.
Wear gloves with a soft lining when it’s cold outside. Cold weather can make dry, cracked hands worse. Protect your hands from cold weather by wearing leather or wool gloves that are lined with silk or synthetic materials. The soft lining will help to keep your hands soft and protected.[8]
Many glove manufacturers are aware of sensitive skin and well-known brands with a nice lining will protect your hands from the cold. Be sure to try on the gloves before purchasing to ensure they fit well and have a soft lining.
Avoid gloves that have a wool lining, as this can irritate sensitive skin.
Moisturize your hands regularly. Get in the habit of applying hand cream to your hands throughout the day, up to six times. Carry a small jar or tube of hand cream in your bag so you can apply it to your hands as needed. Have a routine where you moisturize your hands in the morning and at night before bed so they stay soft and hydrated.[9]
Try several different varieties to find the one that works best for you.[Edit]References↑ http://thedermblog.com/2013/02/28/tips-for-preventing-and-treating-dry-cracked-hands/

↑ http://thedermblog.com/2013/02/28/tips-for-preventing-and-treating-dry-cracked-hands/

↑ http://www.vivawoman.net/2009/06/diy-beauty-milk-and-oats-hand-soak/

↑ http://www.elle.com/beauty/makeup-skin-care/advice/a40591/dry-winter-skin-remedies/

↑ http://thedermblog.com/2013/02/28/tips-for-preventing-and-treating-dry-cracked-hands/

↑ https://healfastskincare.com/how-to-treat-dry-cracked-hands/

↑ http://thedermblog.com/2013/02/28/tips-for-preventing-and-treating-dry-cracked-hands/

↑ http://www.elle.com/beauty/makeup-skin-care/advice/a40591/dry-winter-skin-remedies/

↑ http://thedermblog.com/2013/02/28/tips-for-preventing-and-treating-dry-cracked-hands/

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Today in History for 31st March 2020

Historical Events

1905 – 67th Grand National: Frank Mason victorious aboard Kirkland; first Welsh-trained horse to win the event
1978 – Wings release “London Town” album
1985 – 15th Easter Seal Telethon raises $27,400,000
1985 – 4th NCAA Women’s Basketball Championship: Old Dominion beats Georgia, 70-65; Monarchs’ Tracy Claxton, MOP
1990 – Major riots occur in London and other British towns in protest against the new Community Charge poll tax laws
1991 – Nabisco Dinah Shore Women’s Golf, Mission Hills CC: Amy Alcott breaks her own scoring record to win her 3rd DS by 8 strokes over Dottie Pepper; her 5th major title, and 29th and final LPGA Tour win

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Famous Birthdays

1675 – Benedict XIV, [Prospero L Lambertini], Italian Pope (1740-58)
1730 – Étienne Bézout, French mathematician (d. 1783)
1839 – Nikolay Przhevalsky, naturalist, explorer of east central Asia (OS)
1916 – John Vivyan, actor (Imitation of Life, Mr Lucky), born in Chicago, Illinois
1933 – Bob Simmons, Fulham England, stuntman (double for James Bond)
1987 – “Baby M” born to a surrogate mother, awarded to her dad William Stern

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Famous Deaths

1389 – Everhard Tserclaes, sheriff of Brussels, murdered
1741 – Pieter Burman the Elder, Dutch classical scholar, dies at 72
1885 – Franz W Abbot, German composer/choir conductor, dies at 65
1956 – Ralph DePalma, Italian-American auto racer (Indianapolis 500 1915; American AAA National Dirt Track C’ship 1908-11), dies of cancer at 73
1982 – Fritz Eberhard, West German lawyer and resistor (Law), dies at 85
1983 – Christina Stead, Australian writer (b. 1902)

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How to Handle the Stress of Planning Your Future (for College Students)

Planning for your future is exciting, but it can also be really stressful. As a college student, you may be thinking about what you’re going to do after graduation. A job, more school, a career path, or even traveling are all paths that you could take. To handle the stress of planning for your future, try to solidify your plan, avoid comparing yourself to others, and focus on your day-to-day experiences to turn graduation into a positive milestone rather than a negative one.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Managing Anticipatory Stress
Make graduation a positive goal instead of a negative deadline. As you prepare for the future, you may start to dread your graduation date. However, getting through college is tough, and you should look forward to your graduation and congratulate yourself for making it this far. Try to see your graduation date as the beginning of a new and exciting chapter in your life.[1]
Celebrate your graduation with your friends and family to solidify this as a good thing instead of a negative deadline.
Focus on your day-to-day experiences. It can be easy to become overwhelmed by thoughts of the future as you start planning ahead. Take time out of your day to appreciate where you are right now. Although college can be stressful at times, take note of your friends, your family, and the good times that you are having while you are in school right now.[2]
People often look back on their college years as some of the most fun ones. Try to appreciate where you are right now instead of stressing about the future all the time.
Think positively about your future. A negative mindset will only serve to bring you down and lead to more stress. Try to keep a positive outlook when you think about your future plans. Remember that you are more than just your career path, and try to think about all the things you might accomplish some day.[3]
The future should be something to look forward to, not something to dread.
Avoid comparing yourself to others. Everyone is on a different life path, and when you compare yourself to others, you are ignoring your different backgrounds and struggles. As you plan for your future, keep your thoughts on yourself, and try to avoid comparing your achievements to your peers’, friends’, and family members’.[4]
Remember that most of your friends are also stressed about the future.
Try not to get discouraged if you can’t find a job right away. If you plan to start a career right after college, it can be frustrating to look for jobs. Often, people do not end up getting their dream job when they first apply to it. As you look for jobs, keep in mind that you are still young and you may not go down the exact path that you set for yourself.[5][Edit]Planning for Your Future
Evaluate your own skills and interests to decide what you want to do. As you get closer to graduating college, you have probably amassed a fair amount of skills from classes and internships. Combine these with your interests to determine what path you want to take after college. Graduate school, a job, or a career path are all valid options to choose in your desired area.[6]
Factor the degree you will be graduating with into your career path as well.
Reach out to your advisors to get advice. The advisors who helped you pick your class schedule can also help you plan for your career. Set up a meeting with your advisor and ask them specific questions about their own career paths and if they have any advice on reaching your goals. Write down any suggestions or tips they have that could help you in the future.[7]
For example, you could ask, “Are there any job posting boards for my career path?”
”Do you know how much demand there is in the field?”
”Do you have any advice on how to get my foot in the door at a large company?”
Go to graduate school if your job requires a higher degree. Grad school is a huge step, and it usually takes more time and effort to complete than an undergraduate degree. If you are committed to following a job path that requires either a Master’s degree or a PhD., consider going to graduate school right away. Undergraduate degrees like pre-med and pre-law will probably not be applicable to any jobs you apply for.[8]
You may be able to find a job that will pay for your graduate program while you work there.
Find a job if you’re eager to work in your field or if you need the money. If you’re excited about starting your career, look for a job that begins right after you graduate. Also, student loans are a concern for many college students. Typically, you have about 6 months after you graduate with your undergraduate degree before you must start paying your student loans back. If you’d like to get a jump start on the process, look for work so you can start chipping away at your debt.[9]
Be sure to factor your student loan payments into any budget you create for yourself in the future.
Visit your college’s career center for job-hunting resources. Most 2 and 4 year colleges have career centers that help students plan for their job and career prospects. Set up an appointment with yours and get advice about finding a job, building a resume, and making connections in your field.[10]
Take a gap year to decide your path if you can. If you aren’t really sure what you’d like to do after college, consider taking 10 to 12 months to think about it. You can work a minimum wage job, travel, or pursue a hobby as you decide what to do with your life. Keep your expenses as low as possible by living with a family member as you decide which avenue to pursue.[11]
Taking a gap year can help your brain to decompress from the stresses of college.
Not everyone can afford to take a gap year.[Edit]Tips
If you are having a lot of trouble managing your stress, talk to a student counselor on campus.[Edit]References↑ https://www.wgu.edu/blog/stress-college-students-2019-how-to-cope1902.html

↑ https://www.apa.org/topics/stress/

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/healthy-living/finding-the-right-career.htm

↑ https://www.wgu.edu/blog/stress-college-students-2019-how-to-cope1902.html

↑ https://www.wgu.edu/blog/stress-college-students-2019-how-to-cope1902.html

↑ https://www.fredonia.edu/student-life/career-development-office/c-c1

↑ https://www.fredonia.edu/student-life/career-development-office/c-c1

↑ https://www.swarthmore.edu/SocSci/tburke1/gradschool.html

↑ https://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2012/11/12/6-things-you-must-do-to-get-your-first-job-after-college/#19dd46897f74

↑ https://money.usnews.com/money/careers/applying-for-a-job/articles/2018-03-12/how-to-make-the-most-of-your-college-career-center

↑ https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/careers-in-psych/201903/considering-gap-year-after-graduation

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How to Preserve Roses in Resin

Instead of throwing away that beautiful bouquet of roses, use them to create a keepsake you can enjoy for a long time to come. By preserving roses in resin, you can make paperweights, decorative accents, or personal gifts to give to others. It’s best to use dried roses so their coloring stays vibrant, and it takes about 5-10 days to dry them by hanging them upside down. After you’ve dried the roses, you should be able to complete this project from beginning to end within 4-5 hours.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Drying the Roses
Choose roses at the peak of their bloom for the most vibrant color. Avoid picking roses that haven’t opened up yet or that are already starting to brown or droop. You can either buy roses from a store or cut them from a rose bush.[1]
If you’re cutting your own from a rose bush, it’s a good idea to wear garden gloves to protect your skin from the thorns.
Trim away the majority of the leaves from the roses’ stems. Either pull the leaves off by hand or use a pair of scissors to cut them off where they intersect with the stem. You could also shave off the thorns if you’re worried about getting pricked by them.[2]Leaving a few leaves in place will give you the chance to incorporate them into your design if you want. They can add a nice pop of color against the rose.
Wrap a piece of twine around the stem of each rose and tie it in a bow. Use a piece of twine and wrap it around 3-4 times before tying the bow. Make the bow as tight as possible so the bundle of roses won’t come apart once it’s hanged.[3]If you don’t have twine, a rubber band will work just as well. Just wrap it around several times until it’s tight against the stems.
Hang the roses upside down in a dry, airy place. Keep them out of sunlight so their color doesn’t fade. Put them in a closet or cupboard where there isn’t a lot of moisture in the air, and simply hang them from a hook or nail.[4]
Excessive moisture could keep the roses from drying and could even cause them to grow mold.
Check the roses every 5-10 days to see if they are dry to the touch. Roses don’t take very long to dry, so you should be ready to move on with your project within 1-2 weeks. When you touch the roses, they should feel crispy and the petals should no longer be soft or pliable.[5]
Cut the stem away from the bud of the roses after they have fully dried. Once you’re ready to start the preservation process, trim away the stem. If you want to use any of the leaves, cut them off and set them to the side along with the rosebuds.The stem would most likely just get in the way and be too long to fit in the mold properly.
Use a convection oven to dry roses in 3-4 hours. Lay the roses out on a clean baking sheet and preheat the oven to . Place the baking sheet on the lowest rack and leave the roses in the oven for 2-3 hours. Check them after that time and add an additional hour if they aren’t dry yet.[6]
A normal oven may not be able to go as low as and often has more moisture than a convection oven. You can still try this method with a normal oven, but be aware that you may not get the same results.
Dry roses in 1-2 days with desiccant in the microwave. Bury roses in a microwave-safe container filled with desiccant. Microwave the container along with a mug full of water for 2 minutes. Poke through the desiccant with a toothpick to check the roses, and continue microwaving them in 1-minute intervals until they’re fully dry. Carefully remove the container and let it sit for 24 hours before removing the roses.[7]A desiccant is any substance that can be used as a drying agent. There are several options you can use, but silica gel is the fastest. You can buy it at most garden supply stores.[Edit]Preparing the Resin
Use clear polyester casting resin for the cheapest option. This type of resin will dry clear so you’ll be able to see the rose inside really well. It also dries a little slower than epoxy resin, which means you have a little more time to arrange the rose and perfect your craft.[8]
You can find this product at most craft stores or you can order it online.
Choose an epoxy resin if you want an amber cast to the finish. Epoxy resin is typically a little faster-drying and longer-lasting than polyester resin, though both options should create keepsakes that will last for years. If you like the idea of a lightly tinted finish, epoxy resin is the way to go.[9]
You can also buy clear epoxy resins, but the cost is much higher than what you would pay for a clear polyester resin.
Work in a well-ventilated area to combat the resin’s strong odor. Once your roses are dry and you’re ready to complete your project, set up your tools outdoors if possible. If you do have to work inside, open up as many windows as you can and use a fan to circulate the air faster.[10]
If you’re sensitive to strong smells, consider wearing a face mask while you work.
Wear rubber gloves to protect your hands from the resin. If you do happen to get resin on your fingers, simply rinsing them with water won’t get it off completely and the resin will leave a sticky residue. Safely remove resin without using harmful chemical products by doing the following:[11]
Mix 1/2 tablespoon (4.5 grams) of poppy seeds with of dish soap. Rub the mixture into your hands for 60 seconds without adding water. Then add water, wash your hands, and scrub away any remaining resin. The poppy seeds act as an exfoliant to rough up the resin and get it to detach from your skin.
If you don’t have poppy seeds, coffee grounds would also work.
Measure how much resin your mold will hold. Your mold may have this information printed on it, but if not, you can figure it out yourself. Simply pour water into the mold and then pour that water into your measuring cup to see how much liquid there is.[12]You can buy molds at most craft stores or online.
Plastic molds work just fine, but you could also invest in latex-rubber molds, which are more flexible and easier to remove once the resin is set. deep}}.
Pour enough resin into the disposable measuring cup to fill the mold. You can buy disposable measuring cups online, at craft stores, or at most local grocery stores. Look for ones that include measurements on the side so that it’s easy to pour the right amount of resin.[13]Because the resin is so hard to clean off, disposable measuring cups guarantee that you won’t accidentally ruin your normal measuring cups.
Add the catalyst to the resin per the instructions on the resin container. In general, the catalyst makes up 1-2% of the total volume of the resin, so if your mold holds , you would need to add about 16 drops of resin. The resin container should have a chart on the back that gives you a breakdown of how much to use.[14]The catalyst heats the resin and helps it harden, or cure. Without it, your mold would never harden into a beautiful keepsake.
Stir the resin and catalyst with a wooden skewer for 60 seconds. If you don’t have a wooden skewer, use something else that is also disposable, like a plastic spoon or popsicle stick. It’s important you mix things well so that the catalyst gets activated.[15][Edit]Creating the Mold
Pour the stirred resin into the mold. After stirring together the catalyst and resin for 60 seconds, carefully pour the mixture into the mold you’ve chosen for your roses. Be careful to not drip the resin onto your work surface or get it onto the edges of the mold itself.[16]If you’re worried about spills, lay some old newspaper underneath your work station.
Place the rose into the resin in the design that you want. Depending on the type of mold you chose, be aware of which side will be the top. For example, if you’re using a domed mold, you’ll want to insert the rose into the resin facedown so that it’ll be visible once it’s right-side up. Use the wooden skewer to push the rose into place.[17]The rose will most likely rise to the top of the resin, and that is okay. Right now, focus on getting it into a general placement. You’ll have a chance to push it deeper in a little while.
This is also the time to add the dried leaves if you saved any. You could also add other dried flowers.
Set a timer for 10 minutes and let the resin set to a gel-like consistency. If after 10 minutes the resin is still very liquid-like, set the timer for an additional 10 minutes. You want the resin to be pliable so you can push the rose in further without it popping back up but not so hard that you can’t make any adjustments.[18]
If you’re working indoors or in a humid climate, it may take closer to 30 minutes for the resin to get to the right consistency.
Finalize the positioning once the resin is the right consistency. Use your wooden skewer to push the rose deeper into the resin. If it floated off to the side, you can also push it back into place. Use this time to arrange any other flowers or leaves that are in the mold.[19]It’s very hard to make roses look bad. Even if things are off-center a little, the end result will still look beautiful.
Let the resin set for about 4 hours or until it is completely hardened. Consult the back of the resin container to see how long they recommend for the curing process. It usually takes several hours, but if you made a really large or deep mold, it could take longer.[20]
If the resin is still sticky to the touch, it’s not done. When it’s fully dry, it should be smooth and hard.
Remove the mold from the resin to reveal your creation! Loosen the mold from around the resin to pop it out, or peel away the mold if you used a flexible one. Use your mold as a decorative accent around your home, as a paperweight, or give it away as a gift.[21]
The molds should come away clean, which means you can reuse them to make even more![Edit]Tips
Put a felt bottom on the completed mold if it’ll be on top of a hard surface that you want to protect from potential scratches.[22][Edit]Things You’ll Need
Scissors
Twine
Rubber gloves
Clear polyester casting resin
Catalyst liquid
Disposable mixing cup
Resin mold
Wooden skewer
Dried roses
Paper towels[Edit]References↑ https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/kids/activities/preservewildflowers.shtml

↑ https://youtu.be/gVDnQOKP8kA?t=72

↑ https://youtu.be/gVDnQOKP8kA?t=138

↑ https://youtu.be/gVDnQOKP8kA?t=163

↑ https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/kids/activities/preservewildflowers.shtml

↑ https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep004

↑ https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ep004

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=114

↑ http://www.sollercomposites.com/EpoxyResinChoice.html

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=180

↑ https://youtu.be/rg04x5vvRF4?t=29

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=150

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=173

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=196

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=206

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=213

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=231

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=244

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=249

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=318

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=328

↑ https://youtu.be/AAr2wijpISA?t=308

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