How to Put Music on Your iPhone Without iTunes

This wikiHow teaches you different ways to sync audio files from your computer to an iPhone without using iTunes. If you’re using a Mac running Catalina or later, you can use Finder in place of iTunes to manage your music library. If you’re using Windows and prefer not to use iTunes, you can try a free alternative like MediaMonkey. If you subscribe to Spotify Premium, it can be used on Windows or macOS to copy music files to your iPhone. And if you’re just looking to share a few files, you can use the free Dropbox app, which comes with a built-in music player!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using Finder for macOS Catalina and Later
Open Finder . It’s the two-toned face icon on the Dock, which is usually at the bottom of the screen.[1]
Connect your iPhone to your Mac. Once your iPhone is detected, you’ll see its name appear in the left panel of Finder under “Locations.”
If prompted to do so, click Trust to allow your iPhone to access data on your Mac.
Click your iPhone in the left panel. Information about your iPhone will appear in the main (right) panel.
Click the tab. It’s near the top of the right panel.
Check the “Sync Music onto your device” box. It’s at the top of the right panel.
Choose which music to sync. To sync all of the music on your Mac to your iPhone, select “Entire music library.” If you’d prefer to choose specific music, select “Selected artists, albums, genres, and playlists.” Both options appear next to “Sync” in the right panel.
If you chose to sync certain content, check the boxes next to everything you’d like to sync in the bottom part of the right panel.
If you’d like to sync video as well, check the box next to “Include videos.”
Click or . You’ll see one of these options at the bottom-right corner of the Finder window, depending on whether you’ve changed any settings. The selected music will now sync to your iPhone. [Edit]Using Spotify Premium
Sign up for Spotify Premium. A premium Spotify membership will allow you to sync MP3, M4P/AAC (DRM-protected audio files purchased from iTunes/Apple Music), and MP4 files to your iPhone as long as Spotify is installed at both locations.[2]Click here for details on signing up for a Premium membership.
Download and install the Spotify on your computer. You can get it from http://www.spotify.com/download. Once you’ve installed Spotify, log in using the account you use to access your Premium membership.
Open your Spotify preferences. To do this, click the menu at the top-left corner of Spotify, select Edit, and then click Preferences.
Toggle on the switch next to “Show Local Files.” It’s under the “Local Files” header in the main panel.
Add your music files to Spotify. To do this:
Toggle on the switch next to “Show Local Files” in the right panel.
Click ADD A SOURCE under this header.
Select the folder that contains your music files and click OK. Spotify will import the files in that folder.
You’ll find all of your imported files in the Local Files tab in the left panel under “YOUR LIBRARY.” It may take several minutes for the files to import.
Create a new playlist for the files you want to sync. Your iPhone can access files from your computer as long as you put them into a playlist and download them to your computer first. To create the playlist:
Click +New Playlist near the bottom-left corner of Spotify.
Type a name for the list and click CREATE.
Click the Local Files tab to view your local files.
Drag the desired songs to the new playlist in the left panel.
Click the playlist in the left panel and make any changes if desired.
Slide the Download switch at the top-right corner of the playlist to the On (green) position.
Install the Spotify app on your iPhone. You can download the app for free from the App Store.
If your iPhone is not already connected to the same Wi-Fi network as your computer that’s running Spotify, connect to that network now.
Open the Spotify app on your iPhone. It’s the green circle icon with three curved black lines inside. If you’re not already signed in with your Premium account, follow the on-screen instructions to sign in now.
Tap . It’s the icon of three book spines at the bottom-right corner. This opens your Library to the Playlists tab by default.
Tap the new playlist you created on your computer. The contents of the playlist will appear.
Slide the “Downloaded” switch to the On (green) position. Once the switch is green, Spotify on your iPhone will start downloading all of the music files in the playlist so that you can listen to them offline.
It may take a while for the files to sync completely, especially if you have a lot of them. You’ll see a green arrow next to each song that has been synced to your iPhone.[Edit]Using MediaMonkey for Windows
Download and install MediaMonkey. MediaMonkey is a free popular music manager and player for Windows that can be used to sync music to your iPhone. You can download it from https://www.mediamonkey.com/download.
The files you copy from your computer to your iPhone can be listened to in the regular Music app.
Install the desktop version of iTunes. Although you won’t be using iTunes to make the transfer, you will need to have the Windows desktop version of the program installed so you have access to some behind-the-scenes necessities.[3] If you downloaded iTunes from the Microsoft Store, you will need to uninstall it and reinstall the version on Apple’s website. Follow these steps:
First, press to open the Search bar, type , and then click Microsoft Store. Search for iTunes—if you see an “Install” button, you can close the window and skip to the next step (don’t click it). If you see “Launch”, open the Start menu, right-click iTunes and then select Uninstall to remove it.
Go to https://www.apple.com/itunes, click Windows next to “Looking for other versions,” and then click Download iTunes for Windows for your correct version.
Run the iTunes installer to install it on your PC. When the installation is complete, launch iTunes.
Go to Edit > Preferences > Devices and check the box next to “Prevent iPods, iPhones, and iPads from syncing automatically.”
Connect your iPhone and to the PC and click its icon at the top-left corner of iTunes. In the window that opens, scroll down and uncheck “Automatically sync when this iPhone is connected”.
Click the Music tab in the left panel and uncheck “Sync Music” if it’s checked. Repeat for the Podcasts tab if you want MediaMonkey to handle your podcasts.
Open MediaMonkey while your iPhone is still connected. You can close iTunes if you have it, as it will no longer be necessary.
The first time you run MediaMonkey, give the app permission to scan for music files on your PC. Once your files are detected, they’ll be added to an iTunes-style library that you can easily sync to your iPhone.[4]
Click in the left panel of MediaMonkey. This will open the iPhone’s Summary page.
Choose how to sync your files. Click the Tools menu, select Options, and then click Portable Device Sync to access your settings. Here you can configure the following:
Click the Auto-Sync tab to choose which music to sync automatically. If you’re okay with MediaMonkey automatically syncing files to your iPhone as soon as you connect it, leave the defaults alone. If you’d prefer to sync music manually, remove the checkmark from “Auto-sync as soon as the device is connected.”
Click the Options tab to fine-tune your preferences, including setting your preferences for how ID3 tags will be handled and whether files of certain types should be converted.
Sync file to your iPhone. If you chose to sync automatically, there’s no need to complete this step. Otherwise, once you’ve added your music and configured your settings, you can start syncing your music collection to your iPhone. There are a couple of ways to do this:
Right-click on a song or selection of songs and select Send To > Your iPhone.
Select a song, album, or playlist and drag it over to your iPhone in the tree.
Click your iPhone and click Auto-Sync, select music to sync, and then click Apply to begin the sync.[Edit]Using Dropbox
Sign up for a Dropbox account at https://www.dropbox.com. You can add songs from your computer to Dropbox and play them using the Dropbox app on your iPhone. Basic (free) Dropbox accounts come with 2 GB of space, but you can upgrade to Dropbox Plus (2 TB), Dropbox Professional (3 TB), or Dropbox Business (5 TB) if you need more.[5]
Install the Dropbox client on your computer. This will add a Dropbox folder to your menu bar (top-right corner on a Mac) or system tray (bottom-right corner in Windows). Anything you place in this folder will be uploaded to your Dropbox account.
Installing the client is optional but does make things easier. If there’s a reason you aren’t able to install the client, go to https://www.dropbox.com and log in to your account to access the web interface.
Copy the music files you want to add to your iPhone to your Dropbox folder. You can open the Dropbox folder by clicking the Dropbox icon in your System Tray or menu bar, and then clicking the folder button. Dropbox supports music in .mp3, .aiff, .m4a, and .wav formats.[6]
If you’re using the web version, click Upload files in the right panel, select the files you want to add, and then click OK to start uploading.
Wait for the music to upload. This may take a while if you are adding a lot of music files, and the speed is dependent on your internet connection. You can monitor the progress in the Dropbox menu in your system tray or menu bar.
Install Dropbox on your iPhone. The app is free and can be downloaded from the App Store. Once the app is installed, launch it and sign in using the same Dropbox account you use on your computer.
Tap the song that you want to play. Dropbox will stream any of the songs that you have stored on your Dropbox account as long as you have a network connection. The songs will continue playing in the background even if you switch apps.
Mark songs as Favorites to make them available offline. Normally Dropbox streams the songs that you select over the internet, but you can mark songs as Favorites to make them always available, even when you don’t have an internet connection.
Swipe the song that you want to keep on the device from left to right.
Tap the star to store the song on your iPhone.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Get Songs off an iPod Without iTunes
Put Photos on an iPhone
Add Music to iPod Without Deleting Old Music
Put Music from YouTube on Your iPod[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT210611

↑ https://support.spotify.com/us/using_spotify/features/listen-to-local-files/

↑ https://www.mediamonkey.com/wiki/index.php/WebHelp:iPod_Synchronization/4.0

↑ https://www.mediamonkey.com/sw/webhelp/frame/index.html?addingexistingfilestothelibrary.htm

↑ https://help.dropbox.com/accounts-billing/space-storage/can-i-buy-more-space

↑ https://www.dropbox.com/help/228

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Today in History for 3rd March 2020

Historical Events

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1853 – US Assay Office in NYC authorized
1869 – 31st Grand National: George Stevens wins his 4th GN aboard 100/7 outsider The Colonel; repeats with back-to-back victories the following year
1905 – Tsar Nicholas II of Russia agrees to summon a ‘consultative assembly’ and concedes other points including an edict of religious toleration, relief for Jews, and the cancellation of certain debts
1991 – Switzerland votes on lowering voting age from 20 to 18
2013 – A 2 year old US girl becomes the first child born with HIV to be cured

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Famous Birthdays

1906 – Krishnarao Shiva Shelvankar, journalist/diplomat
1926 – James Ingram Merrill, American poet/author (Scripts for the Pageant)
1953 – Aleksandr Viktorovich Borodin, Russian cosmonaut
1970 – Scott Keswick, Nevada, gymnast (Coca-Cola-1st-94, Olympics 1996)
1971 – Tyler Florence, American chef, Food Network personality and cookbook author, born in Greenville, South Carolina
1972 – Darren Anderton, English footballer

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Famous Deaths

1920 – Theodor Philipsen, Danish painter, dies at 79
1945 – Koos Speenhoff, Dutch singer, killed in bombing raid at 75
1991 – Johnny Revolta, American golfer (PGA C’ship 1935; 18 PGA Tour titles), dies at 79
1996 – Ludwig Freiherr von Hammerstein-Equord, German journalist, dies at 76
2001 – Louis Edmonds, American actor (b. 1923)
2003 – Luis Marden, American photojournalist (b. 1913)

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How to Make Bamboo Straws

Plastic straws take a long time to break down naturally, so replacing them with eco-friendly, reusable alternatives can help keep dangerous pollutants out of the environment. While you can always buy bamboo straws online or from home good stores, you can also try making your own from any healthy bamboo shoots. Bamboo straws still break down over time, but as long as you take care of them properly, you can use them for up to a year before putting them in a recycling or compost bin.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Cutting the Bamboo
Choose healthy bamboo stalks that are as thin as a pencil. Look for shoots that are as thin or thinner than a pencil so you can comfortably drink through them. Opt for bamboo stalks that have at least between nodes, which are the horizontal bands on the stalks.[1]
Avoid using stalks that are thicker than since you may have difficulty using the straw.
Look out for spotted or rotted bamboo since it could weaken your straw or have harmful bacteria.
It’s okay if the bamboo stalks have slight bends or angles as long as they’re mostly straight.
Clip the bamboo stalks with pruners at a 45-degree angle. Position your cut just above one of the bamboo nodes so it’s able to regrow easily after you cut it. Position the pruners so the blades make a 45-degree angle on the stalk and squeeze the handles tightly together. Leave at least 1–2 nodes on the bamboo so they can continue growing.[2]
Avoid making straight cuts since it can trap water and make the bamboo develop rot.
You can also saw the bamboo stalks at a 45-degree angle with a hacksaw if you don’t have pruners available.
Leave the bamboo vertically in a dry area until it turns tan. Set the bottom end on a cinder block or brick so it’s off the ground to avoid water damage. Lean the bamboo vertically against a wall or rack to help guide any liquid inside down and out of the stalk. Let the bamboo completely dry out until it has a tan color, which usually takes around 2–3 weeks.[3]
Avoid laying the bamboo horizontally since it may not drain properly and could develop rot.
If you plan on drying the bamboo outside, try to use a south-facing wall to ensure it receives sunlight throughout the entire day.
Saw the bamboo into segments between the nodes. Set the bamboo stalk on your work surface so it overhangs the edge by about . Hold the stalk firmly against your work surface with your nondominant hand and make a straight cut over from the node using a hacksaw. Then remove the node on the other side of the straw, leaving a gap. Continue cutting straws from the entire length of the stalk.[4]
Usually, a section of bamboo will make between 4–16 straws depending on their lengths.
Avoid making straws shorter than since they may not be tall enough for most cups.
Don’t use pruners to cut dry bamboo since you could cause the stalks to crack or splinter easier.[Edit]Sanding and Cleaning the Straws
Sand the ends of the straw with sandpaper to remove sharp edges. Place a piece of fine-grit sandpaper, such as 180- or 220-grit, over one of the straw’s cut ends. Apply firm pressure and spin the sandpaper around the straw to taper the end. If you still have trouble smoothing the edge, hold the sandpaper face-up against your work surface and rub the end of the straw against it until it feels smooth. Repeat the process on the other end of the straw.[5]
Avoid using the straw without sanding it first since you could easily cut your mouth or get splinters.
Blow the sawdust off of the straw occasionally so you can see what you’re working on.
Smooth the outside of the straw with sandpaper or a belt sander. Wrap a piece of 180-grit sandpaper around the outside of the straw and rub it up and down the bamboo’s length. Rotate the straw as you work to smooth it out evenly. If you’re using a belt sander, wear safety glasses to protect yourself from kickback. Hold the ends of the straw and lightly press the side of the straw against the moving belt on the sander. Move the straw back and forth so you sand the exterior evenly, rotating the straw as you work your way around the bamboo.[6]
It’s okay to leave bumps or angled sections on the length of the straw if you want.
Don’t apply too much pressure while sanding, or else you could crack the bamboo.
Run sandpaper through the middle of the straw. Cut a strip of 180- or 220-grit sandpaper that’s about wide and long. Roll the piece of sandpaper lengthwise to form it into a long coil. Feed the end of the coil into the middle of the straw and push it through the length of the straw. Pull the sandpaper out from the other side. Repeat the process 3–4 times to smooth the inside edges.[7]
Push the sandpaper with a thin stick or wire if you have trouble pulling it through the bamboo.
Clean out the inside of the straw with a pipe-cleaning brush. Push the thin end of the pipe-cleaning brush into the middle of the straw. Rotate the brush clockwise 1–2 rotations before pulling the brush out. Continue dusting out the straw from both side s5–6 times, or until you don’t see visible dust when you remove the brush.[8]
Pipe-cleaning brushes usually have stiff bristles in a cylindrical or conical shape to help clean the sides of pipes, and you can buy them from your local hardware store.
You may also try aiming compressed air inside the straw and blowing the dust out in 1- to 2-second bursts into each side until you don’t see any more come out.[Edit]Treating and Using the Straw
Boil the straw in salt water for 10 minutes before using it. Bring of water mixed with 2 teaspoons (12 g) of table salt to a boil on your stove before putting the straws inside. Put the lid on the pot and allow the straws to boil for 10 minutes to kill any bacteria. Remove the straws from the water with a pair of tongs and set them on a towel in a well-ventilated area to cool down and dry, which will take about 30 minutes.[9]
Make sure you use a pot that’s large enough to fully submerge the straws, or else they won’t be disinfected properly.
You can use the straw as soon as it cools down.
Wash and dry the straw by hand right after you’re finished using it. Use the straw as you normally would with any type of drink. When you finish the drink, give the straw a quick rinse with clean water. When you have time for a more thorough clean, rinse the straw with soapy water. Set the straw in a well-ventilated area so it can dry.[10]
Avoid leaving any sticky or sugary drinks dry inside of the straw since they could weaken the wood or cause buildup inside.
If you have buildup inside the straw, try to scrape it out with a pipe-cleaning brush.
Keep the straws in a dry place that’s room temperature, such as a cabinet drawer.
Recycle or compost the straw if the ends begin splintering. Check the ends of the straw whenever you’re about to use it to make sure the ends aren’t cracking. If you notice the straw breaking, put it in your recycling or compost bin instead of your regular trash. Usually, your bamboo straw will last about 1 year as long as you take good care of it.[11]
Make multiple straws at a time so you have a replacement ready when you’re finished using another one.[Edit]Tips
Make multiple straws at a time so you can bring one with you when you travel and leave one at home. That way, you always have an easy replacement as well.[Edit]Warnings
Always check the ends of the straw before using them to avoid injuring yourself since they could split or splinter.
Wear safety glasses when using a belt sander in case the bamboo breaks while you’re working.
Never touch a moving belt sander since you could seriously hurt yourself.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Hand pruners
Hacksaw
Safety glasses
180-grit sandpaper
Belt sander
Pipe cleaning brush
Pot
Stove
Table salt
Dish soap[Edit]References↑ https://youtu.be/sejKUfTkLnk?t=20

↑ https://youtu.be/k9kfIpj0EkI?t=11

↑ https://youtu.be/sejKUfTkLnk?t=35

↑ https://youtu.be/k9kfIpj0EkI?t=17

↑ https://youtu.be/5YZpdbYTfd0?t=89

↑ https://youtu.be/g6RxNau7BrY?t=91

↑ https://youtu.be/g6RxNau7BrY?t=181

↑ https://youtu.be/k9kfIpj0EkI?t=55

↑ https://youtu.be/g6RxNau7BrY?t=236

↑ https://kh.boell.org/en/2018/01/29/growing-sustainable-livelihoods-through-bamboo-straws

↑ https://thirstmag.com/drinks/Are-bamboo-straws-the-next-in-thing

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