How to Play Badminton Better

Badminton is a fun sport and a great form of exercise. To be a knockout badminton player, you have to have lightning-fast feet, strong technique, and a cunning sense of strategy. If you already know how to play badminton but want to elevate your game, you will have to find a way to maximize your strengths and exploit your opponent’s weaknesses.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Master the Basics
Most of the time, hit the centre of the shuttle. You should hit the round rubber centre, or the “sweet spot” of the shuttle every single time. You can practice this technique by looking right at the center of the shuttle when you hit an overhead shot. You can also practice with your hands to try to get a feel for the shuttle.
Hit the shuttle at the top of its arc. To benefit from the speed and height generated by the shuttle, hit it at the top of its arc. This will allow you to shoot a killer overhead and to have more control over the position of the shuttle. Don’t wait for the shuttle to come close to you, or it will be losing momentum and height.
Always return to the middle of the court after you hit the shuttle. Return to the middle of the back of the court. This will make it more difficult for your opponent to run you around and to hit the shuttle in a place that you can’t reach. Standing in the middle of the court while moving your feet and preparing for the next shot will place you in the “position of readiness.”
Hit the shuttle toward the back line. Hitting the shuttle toward the back line takes precision and strength, and it will make your opponent have to shuffle backwards and hit the shuttle with a considerable amount of strength to return your shot. If you’re not sure where to hit the shuttle next, and the back line is wide open, aim it there. At the beginning, aim the shuttle a bit before the back line so you don’t commit a fault if it falls out of bounds behind the back line.
Practice your footwork. Badminton is like squash — success is all in the footwork. If you’re flat-footed on the court, you won’t be able to return your shots. Instead, stay on your toes, move your feet up and down as you wait to return a shot, and move your feet back and forth and side to side in tiny motions to position yourself to return the shot. Don’t be lazy and reach out your hand too wide to try to return the shuttle — instead, make tiny movements with your feet until the shuttle is in perfect position. There are some exercises you can do to help you practice:[1]
Squat jump – Put both hands at your back, then bend your knees as low as you can. Then, jump as high as you can. Do this exercise in 10 reps. This exercise will make your knees and core stronger, so that in the match, you can make a perfect jumping smash.
Agility ladder – There are variety of exercise you can do with this equipment. It will not only help you to improve your footwork, it also helps you to improve your endurance as well.
Lunges – Some people hate to do this exercise, but this actually helps you to build muscle on your legs, especially your quad. I would recommend you guys to do 10 reps jump front lunges and also 10 reps side lunges. Make sure you make big lunges when you are doing it. This will help you to take the shuttle easily, especially on the front court. Do not forget to do it in right techniques as well.
Shadow footwork around the court (with or without shuttle) – Once you have mastered how to take the shuttle in every corner on the court. Get a partner or a coach to help you to point on a corner on the court, then perform the footwork towards the point that has been pointed by him/her.
Practice the short serve. Whether you’re playing singles or doubles, the short serve will catch your opponent off guard. He won’t be expecting it, and may not be able to run up to return the serve in time. To hit the short serve, you shouldn’t just hit the shuttle really lightly, or it will fall on your side of the court. Instead, hit it at a higher contact point and drop it closer to the racket instead of in front of the racket.[2]
Practice the long serve in singles. In singles, hitting a long serve all the way to the back of the service line will throw your opponent off guard. He may be standing in front of the shuttle and can miss it completely, or he may not have enough power to return it. To hit a longer serve, let the shuttle fall in front of you as you swing your racket further back almost to your shoulder level so you generate more momentum before you swing forward and hit the shuttle.[3]
Never give up. Always try to hit the shuttle.[Edit]Exploit Your Opponent’s Weaknesses
Understand your opponent’s game. When you’re playing a new opponent, whether it’s at a competition or during a friendly game at a family outing, you should assess your opponent’s game even while you’re warming up. You should look for a few main things: if your opponent is more of an aggressive or defensive player, if his forehand or backhand is his dominant shot, and any weaknesses, such as slow footwork or weak drop shot returns, that you can exploit.
Make your opponent move around the court. Don’t hit all of your shots to the same location of the court of your opponent will be able to predict your next move every time. Instead, mix things up by hitting a drop shot followed by a shot to the baseline, or by moving your opponent from the right to the left side of the court. Moving from the front to the back of the court is particularly tricky unless your opponent has very nimble feet.
Shoot toward your opponent’s backhand. Many players are weaker on the backhand side, so try shooting toward your opponent’s backhand and see if this makes your opponent return less shots. If so, continue to exploit your opponent’s backhand.
Your backhand is the left side for right-handed players and the right side for left-handed players.
Hit a simple short shot. When you’re up at the net, simply hit the shuttle short, just barely over to your opponent’s side. This will make your opponent run and will catch him off guard. This is a great technique if your opponent is positioned near the back line. If your opponent knows that you are going to do a short shot, you need to flick the shuttle over the opponent or to another side and if you didn’t do this, your opponent will fly the shuttle near the back line.
Change the direction of the shuttle. If your opponent hits the shuttle straight at you, hit the shuttle in a different direction instead of hitting it right back at your opponent, where he will expect it to go. This will work especially well if the shuttle has generated a lot of momentum. If you’re quick on your feet, you can change the direction of the shuttle and not give your opponent enough time to react to a fast-moving shuttle.
Hit a drop shot followed by a shot to the back of the court. If you have mastered the drop shot, then use it to make your opponent run all the way to the front of the court. Then return the next shot all the way to the back of the court. Not only will this force your opponent to be quick on his feet, but it will also catch him off guard. This is also a great way to tire your opponent.
To do a drop shot, hit the shuttle lightly so it just crosses the net.
Make your opponent play your style of game. If you like staying near the net, serve short, hit drop shots, and do whatever you can to make sure that your opponent can’t hit the shuttle to the back line. If you’re more comfortable at the back line, then serve long and hit speedy long shots so your opponent doesn’t have a chance to move you toward the net. Make the opponent lose all control as you play your style of game and maximize your strengths.[Edit]Master More Advanced Techniques
Slice your net shots. This will make the shuttle spin and fall in an unpredictable direction. To slice your net shot, start the forward motion as you normally would, and then move the racket inward as you slice the racket perpendicular to the center of the birdie. Your opponent will be expecting you to hit the birdie directly forward, while it will actually spin cross court.[4]
Slice your drop shots. To do this, slice the racket, or move it perpendicularly over the center of the shuttle when it’s in the air. This will make the shuttle lose much of its momentum and quickly fall on the opponent’s side near the net.[5]
Smash the shuttle. Smashing is when you hit the shuttle with all of your strength at the top of its arc. Point your free hand at the shuttle to keep track of its path, and then swing the racket over your head, hitting the center of the birdie and smashing it down into the opponent’s court. This is similar to serving in tennis.[6]
When you’re smashing the shuttle, aim is just as important as strength. Don’t just blindly hit the shuttle as hard as you can — you should try to aim it either as far away from your opponent as possible or right at your opponent’s body so he will be caught off guard.
Jump before you smash the shuttle. Once you’ve mastered the standard smash, you can practice jumping up as you smash the shuttle. This will give you even more momentum and will make the shuttle fall into your opponent’s court even faster. Just jump up a foot or two, aiming your chest and body in the direction that you want the shuttle to go, and smash it at the center of its arc.
Don’t smash the shuttle every time. The smash should be used at a time when the shuttle is high in the air and you have plenty of time to approach — it should end the point in your favor. If you smash the shuttle at every opportunity, you will tire your arms and will risk smashing it into the net at inopportune moments.
Always plan your next move. A beginning player is just happy when he hits the shuttle over the net. An advanced player understands that a good game of badminton is like a game of chess — you should always position your shot wisely so that you move your opponent to the exact place where you want him to be so you can hit the following shot. Always plan your next move and always think one step ahead of your opponent.[Edit]Badminton Techniques, Exercises, and Warm up
WH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e6307295144f’)Basic Badminton TechniquesWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e63072951cc4’)Exercises to Build Badminton Stamina and AgilityWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5e630729526a9’)Warm Up for Badminton
[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
When choosing a double’s partner you both should have similar strength and skills. Even if your shots aren’t great and you are bad at defense, it is important that your partner can help improve your decision making and you can work together to overcome your weaknesses.
Communication is the key in doubles. Call for shots and tell your partner to ‘leave’ shots that are going out. Use visual communication, letting the player who cannot see his partner make the tactical decisions. For example, when you are in front of your partner, you decide which shots to take and where to move. Do it quickly, so your partner isn’t left guessing.
If possible try to send the shuttlecock to the back line of the court.
Cross drop shots and cross serves will do magic. Try dropping the shuttle diagonally near the net. It is easier to stymie the opponent.
Study your opponent’s weaknesses. Is his backhand weak? Does he have difficulty returning smashes to the body, returning drops, moving backwards, etc? In doubles, is one player weaker than the other? Is one better at the net than the other?
In doubles, avoid blocking a smash softly. There is a person standing in the front waiting to intercept it. Instead, keep lifting it back until they hit back a weaker shot that you can counterattack.
If you are trying for short serve, tilt the racket as you hit the serve. This will lead to a wobbling shuttle, making harder for the opponent to return with accuracy or power.
In short, if you’re pretty sure your opponent cannot return your shot to the back lines, you can stand closer to the net. Remember, these are only assumptions; you still need to keep other possibilities in mind so you aren’t caught off guard.
Net shots are delicate. To control them more accurately, use your fingers to send them where you want.
Aim for the four corners of the opposite side.
If playing doubles, when you serve, the server should go close to the net forcing your opponents to hit it long. Your partner, who is behind you can then return it easily.
When your opponent gives you a backhand shot, try to convert it to forehand by playing the round the head shot whenever possible.
Many people learn to always return to the exact center of the court after each shot. This is actually incorrect. Your “base” changes depending on the type of shot you make. For instance, when you hit a net shot, you bias your base closer to the front. The closer the birdie is to the net, the more forward you stand, because it is harder for your opponent to push you back. (If they try, it is rare that the shuttle will reach the back lines, so you don’t need to worry about covering there.) When you lift to the back, you might want to move back as well to prepare for the smash (especially when you hit high and shallow). And when you smash in singles, your opponent will almost always block it to the front, so prepare to move forward.
Don’t rely on your arm. Instead work your wrist to conserve your stamina. Good wrist play also required to practice more advanced shot techniques. For more power, keep your grip relaxed and tighten your grip on the moment of impact.
Always be precise and deceptive with the service. For example, act as if you are going to serve front but serve back.
Hit the shuttle quickly. This technique will confuse your opponents.
A backhand smash is good move to catch your opponent off guard.
Try to do half smashed. They have half the speed and travel half the distance. Practice it with someone you know. It involves wrist work by jumping up and smashing only with your wrist.
Always return to the center of your side, so that your opponent doesn’t succeed in tiring you.
If you want to hit a smash then practice the squad jump and repeat it 10 times. This will help you to smash harder and better.
Advanced players know how to use deception, so try not to guess what the next shot will be beforehand.[7][Edit]Things You’ll Need
Board shorts
2-4 players
Badminton court
Badminton net
Racket
Shuttlecock(s)
Good sports shoes[Edit]Related wikiHows
Improve Your Reflexes
Win at Badminton
Smash in Badminton[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.menshealth.com.sg/fitness/improve-your-badminton-game/

↑ https://www.masterbadminton.com/badminton-serve.html

↑ https://www.masterbadminton.com/badminton-serve.html

↑ https://www.masterbadminton.com/badminton-net-shot.html

↑ https://www.masterbadminton.com/reverse-slice-drop-shot.html

↑ https://www.masterbadminton.com/badminton-smash.html

↑ https://www.myactivesg.com/Sports/Badminton/Training-Method/Badminton-for-Beginners/The-different-types-of-badminton-shots-and-when-to-use-them

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Today in History for 6th March 2020

Historical Events

1945 – Erich Honnecker and Erich Hanke flee nazis
1959 – 11th Emmy Awards: Playhouse 90, Jack Benny Show, Raymond Burr win
1975 – Algiers Accord: Iran and Iraq announce a settlement of their border dispute.
1987 – Belgium ferry “Herald of Free Enterprise” sinks; 192 die
1999 – 20th Big East Men’s Basketball Tournament: Connecticut beats St. John’s, 82-63
2018 – “Highest overdose death rates ever recorded in the US”, 142,000 overdoses in 2016-17 period according to US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1936 – A “Bram” Stemerdink, Dutch minister of Defense (PvdA)
1940 – Willie Stargell, American Baseball Hall of Fame outfielder/1st baseman (7-time All Star), born in Earlsboro, Oklahoma (d. 2001)
1946 – Richard Noble, Scottish businessman (land speed record 1983-97), born in Edinburgh
1957 – Edward “Eddie” Deezen, American actor (Grease, I Wanna Hold Your Hand), born in Cumberland, Maryland
1967 – Bennie Dekker, Dutch football player (NEC/AZ/De Graafschap), born in Ermelo, Netherlands
1976 – Ken Anderson, American professional wrestler

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Famous Deaths

1842 – Constanze Mozart, wife of W.A. Mozart (b. 1763)
1854 – Charles William Vane, 3rd Marquess of Londonderry, British soldier and politician (b. 1778)
1967 – Zoltán Kodály, Hungarian composer (b. 1882)
1969 – Nadya Rusheva, Russian painter (b. 1952)
1994 – Leighton Noble, singer/Bandleader, dies at 81
1996 – Simon Cadell, English actor (Enemy at the Door), dies at 45

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How to Eat Salmon

If you’re trying to include more fish in your diet, salmon is a great option. It’s high in omega-3 fatty acids, protein, and flavor. Although delicate salmon doesn’t require seasoning, you could marinate it before broiling, grilling, poaching, searing, or roasting it. Remember that salmon can be just as flavorful when you eat it raw or smoked!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Choosing a Cooking Method
Cook salmon under a broiler for fast caramelized flavor. Marinate a salmon fillet in your favorite flavorful ingredients while you preheat a broiler to high. Lay the fish on a baking sheet and place it about below the broiler. Cook the fish for about 6 minutes and then spoon some of the marinade over the top. Broil the fish for another 2 minutes so the salmon chars a little.[1]If you’d like your fish cooked more, continue to broil it for 1-minute increments until it’s as cooked as you like.
Toss salmon on the grill to give it a smoky flavor. Heat a charcoal grill to high and oil the grate so the fish doesn’t stick to it. Lay the fish on the grate flesh-side down and cover the grill. Cook the salmon for 1 to 3 minutes before you flip it over. Then, cover and cook the salmon for another 2 to 5 minutes.[2]Although the USDA recommends cooking salmon until it reaches , you might prefer to cook it less so it stays tender.
If you want to use a gas grill, add wood chips to a smoker basket in order to lightly smoke the fish.
Simmer salmon in white wine for a delicate flavor. To poach salmon fillets, pour about of white wine into a skillet and heat it over medium. Add 1 sliced onion to the simmering wine and lay the salmon fillets on top. Then, put the lid on the skillet and cook the salmon for 5 to 10 minutes or until they flake in the center when you drag a fork across.To add extra flavor, lay fresh herbs, such as parsley or dill, in the skillet before you add the salmon.
Pan-sear salmon steaks to get crispy skin. To cook 1 or 2 salmon steaks quickly, heat of vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot, lay the steaks in the pan so the skin faces down. Cook the salmon for 5 to 7 minutes without turning it so the skin becomes crispy and doesn’t stick. Then, flip the fish over and cook it for 15 seconds so it sears on the top.[3]Serve the crispy salmon steaks immediately so the skin doesn’t begin to soften.
Slow-roast salmon for tender, flaky texture. If you’re worried you’ll overcook the salmon on the grill or stove, place a salmon fillet into a baking dish and preheat the oven to . Season the salmon however you like and drizzle a little extra-virgin olive oil over the fish. Bake the fish for about 30 minutes or until it flakes a little in the center.[4]If you’re serving salmon to a group, consider roasting a whole salmon instead of individual fillets.[Edit]Eating Raw Salmon
Order sushi or sashimi to enjoy the pure taste of the fish. If you love the taste of the fish, order thinly sliced salmon, called sashimi, so you can enjoy the fish’s unique flavor. You may want to order sushi rolls if you like salmon with flavored rice and seaweed. Try eating the salmon sushi with wasabi or soy sauce to add a salty, spicy flavor.[5]If you’d like to make salmon sushi or sashimi at home, use sushi-grade salmon, which has been super frozen to kill parasites.
Try salmon carpaccio for a light appetizer. Instead of sticking with the standard shrimp cocktail, thinly slice raw salmon and spread it on a flat serving plate. Cover the salmon with a lemon-dill vinaigrette and marinate it for at least 2 hours. Then, garnish the salmon carpaccio with a few capers just before serving.[6] of extra-virgin olive oil}}Avoid storing leftover salmon carpaccio because the lime juice will break down the texture of the fish over time.
Make ceviche for salmon with bright citrus flavor. Toss of salmon chunks with of lime juice and let it marinate at room temperature for 30 minutes. Just before you’re ready to serve the ceviche with tostadas or chips, drain the lime juice and stir in your choice of:[7]Salsa
Chopped cucumbers
Diced avocado
Fresh cilantro
Try salmon poke if you enjoy Hawaiian cuisine. Poke is similar to ceviche, but the fish is usually marinated in Asian-inspired ingredients. To enjoy salmon poke at home, mix of salmon chunks with of soy sauce, of rice wine vinegar, of sriracha sauce, and of sesame oil. Marinate the salmon for 15 to 30 minutes and serve the poke salmon with:[8]Steamed rice
Pickled cucumbers
Green salad
Toasted sesame seeds
Matchstick carrots[Edit]Trying Pre-Cooked Smoked Salmon
Blend smoked salmon with cream cheese to make a savory dip. Seafood dip is a popular appetizer since it’s creamy and flavorful. Combine smoked salmon with cream cheese, horseradish, lemon juice, and chives. If you want a lighter dip, substitute equal parts of crème fraîche and plain Greek yogurt for the cream cheese. Then, serve the salmon dip with:[9]Crostini
Breadsticks
Carrot sticks
Sliced cucumbers
Toss smoked salmon into pasta or casseroles. The smoked flavor of the fish helps cut through creamy or rich food, such as risotto, scalloped potatoes, or carbonara. If you don’t want to stir it into the dish, flake a few pieces of the salmon and scatter it over the meal before you serve it.[10]Keep in mind that if you refrigerate leftovers, they’ll become even smokier as they’re stored.
Add smoked salmon to chowder or seafood stew. Round out the flavor of your favorite chowder by stirring flaked or chunked smoked salmon into it. Although the salmon holds up to the thick texture of chowder or stew, it also works well in lighter soups. Try adding smoked salmon to delicate leek and potato soup, for instance.[11]Experiment by putting smoked salmon into your clam chowder.
Lay smoked salmon on toast or a bagel. Toast a bagel or piece of rye bread and spread it with cream cheese. Then, lay a few thin slices of smoked salmon on top along with fresh herbs, such as parsley or dill. You can also top the bagel or toast with shaved radishes to give the salmon a little heat.[12]If you don’t want a bagel or open-faced sandwich, layer the smoked salmon between 2 slices of bread. Consider adding sliced cucumbers and dill for extra crunch.[Edit]Tips
You can also buy already cooked canned salmon. Remove the bones and skin if you like and use the canned salmon to make patties or salmon burgers.
It’s easy to create a healthy salmon dinner. Just pair your choice of salmon with a garden salad, roasted vegetables, or whole grains.[Edit]References↑ https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/broiled-salmon-with-scallions-and-sesame

↑ https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/easy_grilled_salmon/

↑ https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012/06/crispy-salmon-with-steamed-bok-choy-and-basil-caper-relish-recipe.html

↑ https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/slow-roasted-salmon-with-fennel-citrus-and-chiles

↑ https://www.menshealth.com.sg/weight-loss-nutrition/difference-between-raw-salmon-and-salmon-sashimi/

↑ https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/13362/fresh-salmon-carpaccio

↑ https://www.sunset.com/recipe/salmon-ceviche

↑ https://www.jessicagavin.com/spicy-wild-alaskan-sockeye-salmon-poke-bowls/

↑ https://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/slideshow/smoked-fish

↑ https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/10-things-do-smoked-salmon

↑ https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/890642/creamy-smoked-salmon-leek-and-potato-soup

↑ https://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/slideshow/smoked-fish

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