How to Hang an Accordion Rack

An accordion rack is an adjustable storage rack that’s convenient for hanging light items like purses or jackets. It’s a great addition near your front door so guests can leave their belongings right where they enter. If you have an accordion rack, hanging it is a simple job. All it takes is some nails, hanging hardware, and a hammer.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Installing Hangers on the Rack
Buy 2 small, sawtooth hangers. Sawtooth hangers are often used to hang picture frames, but they’ll work perfectly for this project. Visit a hardware or craft store and get 2 hangers that match the size of your rack.[1]
You’ll probably need the smallest size available, but double check to confirm. Make sure the nails with the hangers aren’t long enough to poke through the rack.
There may be packs that sell multiple hangers. This is useful if you might have to hang more things in your home.
2 hangers should support the weight of most accordion racks. If you plan on hanging anything heavier than bags or coats on yours, then add a third hanger in the middle of the rack for extra support.
Place a hanger at the outer top corner on each side of the rack. Open the accordion rack horizontally and find the 2 top corners. Place a hanger in the top corner on each end with the teeth facing down. Make the hangers as level as possible, though they don’t have to be perfectly level to work properly.[2]
Make sure both hangers are facing the correct way. Don’t attach one with the teeth down and one with the teeth up.
Don’t worry about how wide the rack is open at this point. That’s only important when you’re hanging it.
Hammer 2 nails into each hanger to attach them to the rack. Each hanger requires 2 small nails that come in the package. Hammer a nail through each hole in the hangers to attach it.[3]
Confirm that each hanger is straight before hammering the nails.
Since the nails are very small, you can hold them with needle-nosed pliers to avoid hitting your fingers while you hammer.[Edit]Mounting the Rack
Open the rack and measure the space between the hangers. Set the rack to the length that you want it mounted at. Then, take a tape measure or ruler and measure the distance between the center of each hanger. Remember that measurement so your nails are mounted in the correct place.[4]
Make sure the rack is opened to the length that you want before you measure. Otherwise, your measurements will be off.
If you aren’t sure what length you want the rack open to, test it first. Hold it up against your wall at different lengths and see which you like best.
Draw a level line on the wall equal to the distance between the hangers. Go to the spot where you want to hang the rack. Hold a ruler or straight edge against the wall and lightly draw a straight line in pencil equal to the distance between the 2 hangers. Check the line with a level to make sure it’s even.[5]
The most common spot for an accordion rack is just inside the front door so you can hang your bags, keys, or light jackets. Make sure it’s far enough away so the door won’t hit the rack.
Make the rack roughly shoulder-height of an average person so your guests can reach it.
Hammer a finishing nail into each end of the line. Take a finishing nail and hold it against the end of the line on one side. Tap it into the wall with a hammer so it’s slightly angled up. Leave the end sticking out so the hanger can hook over it. Repeat that for the other nail.[6]
A finishing nail is a small, thin nail used for light jobs like hanging frames. You can get them at hardware stores.
Accordion racks are light, so you don’t have to worry about finding studs to hammer into.
You can erase the line after you hammer the nails down.
Hook the rack over the nails the mount it on the wall. With the nails in place, lift the rack into position. Hook the hanger teeth onto the nails. Let go slowly so you know the rack is secure.[7]
If the nails aren’t the perfect distance apart, just open or close the rack to fit the distance.[Edit]Video
[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Sawtooth hangers
Hammer
Tape measure
Pencil
Straight edge
Level[Edit]Tips
If you decide you want to move the rack to a different spot, it’s easy to reinstall. Just take it off the wall and pull the nails out. Then hammer them down in a different spot.
Some racks may already come with the hanging mounts and instructions. Follow the instructions provided if you have them.[Edit]References↑ https://www.woodshopdiaries.com/diy-accordion-coat-rack/

↑ https://youtu.be/g5EohTx8U9I?t=352

↑ https://youtu.be/g5EohTx8U9I?t=352

↑ https://www.woodshopdiaries.com/diy-accordion-coat-rack/

↑ https://www.woodshopdiaries.com/diy-accordion-coat-rack/

↑ https://youtu.be/g5EohTx8U9I?t=393

↑ https://youtu.be/g5EohTx8U9I?t=393

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Today in History for 9th March 2020

Historical Events

1562 – Kissing in public banned in Naples (punishable by death)
1820 – -11) Philippines chases out foreigners; about 125 die
1870 – 32nd Grand National: George Stevens wins consecutive GN’s aboard 7/2 favourite The Colonel; his 5th and final GN victory
1889 – Kansas passes 1st general antitrust law in US
1924 – South Slavia aproves Italy’s annexation of Fiume (Rijeka)
1988 – Actress Audrey Hepburn is appointed a UNICEF Special Ambassador (Goodwill Ambassador 1989)

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Famous Birthdays

1213 – Hugh IV, Duke of Burgundy, French crusader, born in Villaines-en-Duesmois, France (d. 1271)
1918 – Marguerite Chapman, American actress (The Seven Year Itch, Spy Smasher, Flight to Mars), born in Chatham, New York (d. 1999)
1930 – Taina Elg, Finnish-American actress (Hercules in NY, Les Girls), born in Impilahti, Finland
1930 – Thomas Schippers, American conductor (Amahl and Night Visitors), born in Kalamazoo, Michigan (d. 1977)
1936 – Mickey Gilley, American country singer (Urban Cowboy), born in Natchez, Mississippi
1954 – Kevin Wade, American screen writer (Working Girls), born in Chappaqua, New York

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Famous Deaths

1877 – Mark Prager Lindo, English Dutch author (Neth Spectator), dies at 58
1969 – Richard Crane, American character actor (Surfside 6, Rocky Jones, Space Ranger), dies of a heart attack at 50
1979 – Barbara Mullen, American actress (Thunder Rock, Innocent Sinners), dies of a heart attack at 64
2004 – John Mayer, Indian composer (Indo-Jazz Fusion), dies at 74
2012 – Lord Wedderton of Charlton, British academic and politician, dies at 84
2012 – Peter Bergman, American Comedian, dies from leukemia at 72

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How to Season a Griddle

When you purchase a new griddle, you definitely want to take care of it to make it lasts a lifetime. Seasoning your griddle is an easy way to create a non-stick coat and add flavor to every dish you cook. Seasoning with oil will also prevent rust from forming on a griddle. If you already have a rusted griddle plate, make sure to remove the rust completely, and then season it to prevent it from happening again in the future.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using Cooking Oil to Season a Griddle
Clean a brand new griddle with soap and water. If you just bought a brand new griddle, it’s important to wash it with soap and water before seasoning. To do this, fill a small bucket of water and pour in some mild dish soap. Mix it together and slowly pour a small amount over your grill. Scrub the soapy mixture on the grill with a sponge, and then rinse it off with a bundle of paper towels.[1]
Do not use soap on a used or older griddle. It may damage the surface.
Remove any leftover food or debris from an older griddle. If you want to season a griddle that has already been used, make sure the surface is clean and clear of any food or debris. Use a metal spatula or scraper to remove any stuck on mess. Then wipe away any debris from the surface.[2]
Scrape off food while the griddle is still hot. This will make it easier to remove than if the griddle is cold.
Use table salt and hot water for extra tough food that’s hard to remove. To do this, pour of salt on a warm griddle, scrub it with a towel, then remove the salt and rinse with water.
Heat the griddle on high for 10-15 minutes. Now that your griddle is clean, turn it on all the way up to the highest setting, and let it heat up for about 10-15 minutes. If this is a new griddle, wait for the surface to blacken. This will allow the oil to burn on the surface.[3]
Pour cooking oil on the griddle and spread it with a paper towel. To season a griddle, you’ll need to add oil to it. Use of oil per of griddle. Cooking oils that are rich in fatty acids are best because they will bond to the griddle plate. Once your spread a good amount of oil on the griddle, use multiple layers of dry paper towel to spread it evenly on the surface.[4]
The best oils for seasoning are olive oil, sesame oil, canola oil, vegetable oil, coconut oil, and flax oil.
Be careful not to burn your fingers. You can use tongs or heat resistant gloves to hold the paper towel if you’re worried about the heat.
Be sure to spread the oil around the edges and corners.
Let the oil sit on the heated griddle for about 20 minutes. Let the oil sit for at least 20-30 minutes, or until it burns off the griddle top. During this time, you’ll notice smoke coming off of the surface. Once the grill stops smoking, the oil is finished burning and you can turn off the griddle and let it cool.[5]
Repeat the process of adding and spreading oil at least 2 times. It takes more than just one coating of oil to properly season a griddle. To ensure that the griddle has a good nonstick plate and is fully coated, heat up the griddle again and add more oil. Repeat the previous step to add oil and spread it with a paper towel.[6]
Do this 2 or 3 more times, or until the griddle surface is permanently dark brown.[Edit]Restoring a Rusted Griddle
Turn the griddle on to high heat and let it sit for 20 minutes. Before attempting to remove rust from your griddle, turn the heat on high. This heat will loosen up any stuck-on food or corrosion before you even begin scraping. This will make it easier to remove.[7]
Use a metal scraper or spatula to remove debris on the surface. Before removing the rust, make sure the griddle plate is completely free of any leftover food. If it is stuck on the surface, scrape it off with a metal scraper. You can also use a metal spatula if you don’t have a grill scraper.[8]
Let the griddle cool down and begin scraping off the rust. Turn off the heat on the griddle, and then use your scraper to begin taking off that rust. You’ll need to use a lot of force to do this, as rust is not easy to remove. Scrape as much off as you can before moving on to the next step.
Do not use any water with the scraper during this step. Water and moisture is the main cause of rust, so you don’t want to make the condition worse.
Pour 4-5 tablespoons of cooking oil on the griddle and use a grill stone to scrub off the rust. Once you have scraped off as much of the rust as possible, pour some cooking oil on the griddle plate. Then, use a grill stone block to scrub all around the rusted surface. A grill stone can be found at most home improvement stores.[9]
If you don’t have a grill stone, try using steel wool or sandpaper.
Wipe the griddle with paper towels until the surface is dry. After you’ve scrubbed the rust with the grill stone, get a bundle of paper towels and wipe it until it is dry. This will further remove any rust on your griddle.
If there’s still rust on your griddle, add more oil to the surface and then wipe again with more dry paper towels. Keep repeating this step until there is little to no residue after you wipe it with the paper towels.[Edit]Tips
Avoid using dish detergent to clean your griddle after seasoning. It will strip any oils and ultimately undo your seasoning.
If you’re not using your griddle on a regular basis, make sure to season it at least every 2 weeks to avoid rusting.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Bucket of water
Mild dish soap
Cooking oil
Paper towels
Tongs or heat resistant gloves
Metal scraper
Grill stone cleaning block[Edit]References↑ https://images.homedepot-static.com/catalog/pdfImages/89/895db59f-18f6-4321-8b8d-ed626ff60d17.pdf

↑ https://images.homedepot-static.com/catalog/pdfImages/89/895db59f-18f6-4321-8b8d-ed626ff60d17.pdf

↑ https://creativecaincabin.com/2018/06/blackstone-griddle-grill/

↑ https://youtu.be/5DZ_V4IYvUI

↑ https://youtu.be/5DZ_V4IYvUI

↑ https://youtu.be/5DZ_V4IYvUI?t=237

↑ https://youtu.be/thPE2IgnSiI?t=49

↑ https://www.webstaurantstore.com/article/142/how-to-clean-a-griddle.html

↑ https://bbqbarbecuegrill.com/other/how-to-remove-rust-from-blackstone-griddle/

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