How to Focus on Yourself After a Breakup

After a breakup, it can be hard to turn your attention away from your ex and onto yourself again. This is normal, but it’s important to make this shift in focus so that you can move forward with your own goals, interests, and life. Start by cutting off all contact with your ex, grieving the relationship, and talking with people during the first week after a breakup. Then, find positive ways to distract yourself, such as by setting goals, taking up a new hobby, or taking care of things you’ve been putting off. Also, make sure to take good care of your mind and body so that you can continue to grow and thrive in your daily life.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Changing Your Focus Right After a Breakup
Cut off all communication with your ex so you can focus on other things. Unfollow or unfriend your ex on social media so you won’t see what they post. Also, don’t contact them via text, email, or phone. This will help to prevent you from focusing on them, which could become an unhealthy habit.[1]
If you need to keep some contact with your ex while you transition out of a shared residence or because you have children together, keep all communications brief and civil. Stick to the basic details you need to communicate.
For example, you could say something like, “I’m going to stop by the house to pick up my things at 5:00 pm today. I’ll leave my key on the kitchen table.” Or, “Can you please have Mindy and Sarah dressed and ready to go at 8:00 am?”
Remove anything in your life that might remind you of them. Put all of your ex’s things into a box and ask a friend to return the items to them. You can also place any items that remind you of your ex into a box and store them somewhere out of sight. If this is difficult for you to do, ask a friend to help you.[2]
For example, if you have pictures of your ex, gifts they bought you, or even sentimental items that remind you of them, place these into the box.
Allow yourself to feel sad and grieve over losing the relationship. If you’ve recently broken up with your ex, it’s normal and acceptable to be sad about it. Let yourself cry about it, lay around in bed, watch sad movies, or do whatever else helps you to grieve. Don’t try to ignore your feelings. It’s important to feel them in order to move on.[3]
Try to limit this grieving period to 2-4 days, then get yourself up and out to do something that will distract you.[4]
Reflect on the relationship so you can make improvements to future ones. Another good way to process your feelings and shift the focus to yourself after a breakup is to think about what killed the relationship. While these things may have been out of your control, it can help you to reflect on them and think about how you might avoid a similar situation in future relationships.[5]
For example, you might note that part of the reason why you and your ex broke up is that you had different life goals. This could tell you that you might have a more successful relationship with someone who shares your goals.
Or, you might note that your relationship troubles resulted from having different communication styles and want to find someone in the future who communicates differently than your ex did.
Talk with a trusted friend or family member about how you’re feeling. Talking through how you’re feeling can also be a helpful way to move forward, so you might ask a friend or family member to meet up with you when they have time to listen. Choose someone who is trustworthy and who will listen carefully and respond in a supportive way. Also, make sure that the person is not someone who might feel awkward discussing your breakup with you, such as a mutual friend of your ex.[6]
Avoid asking friends and family who still have contact with your ex to tell you how they’re doing. This can put you back into a cycle of focusing on your ex instead of yourself.[7]
Find a therapist to help you if you’re struggling. Therapy can help you to develop new tools for dealing with your emotions and it can also give you a safe space to vent about the breakup. If you can’t seem to stop feeling sad about your ex or focusing on them after 2 weeks, find a licensed therapist or counselor who can help you.[8]
If you’re in school, you could also ask to meet with a school counselor.[Edit]Finding Positive Distractions
Identify a meaningful goal for your personal, social, or work life. Setting a goal can give you something positive to focus on and take your mind off of your ex. This goal could be related to your health, career, grades, spiritual life, or something else. As long as the goal is meaningful to you, it can be anything you want. Make sure to start small and be as specific as possible about what you want to accomplish.[9]
For example, instead of setting a goal to lose weight, you might say, “I want to lose over the course of 6 weeks.”
Treat yourself to something special to take your mind off the situation. While indulging yourself after a breakup can be a little dangerous, it might help you to feel better. Treating yourself might mean buying yourself a gift that you’ve wanted for a while, eating a piece of cake, going for a hike, seeing a movie, booking a salon treatment, or playing a round of mini golf with friends. Anything that you consider a treat and that will make you happy is fine.[10]
If you plan to buy something or do something that costs money, try setting a limit on how much you’ll spend. This may be helpful if you’re worried about overdoing it.
Take up a new hobby or learn a new skill. Learning something new is a great way to take your mind off of other things. Choose something that you are genuinely interested in and make learning about it your sole focus for a set amount of time each day. If you need more structure, consider taking a class at your local community college or online.[11]
For example, if you have always wanted to learn how to play guitar, follow along with online videos, take private lessons, or enroll in a class.
If you’re interested in learning a new language, download a language app, listen to a podcast on learning the language, or take a course.
Channel your energy into something productive to improve your life. Identify something you can do that will make your life better and do it. This could be a simple task that you’ve been putting off or something bigger you need to take care of.[12]
For example, now’s the perfect time to tackle that leaky faucet in your kitchen, repot your houseplants, or develop a better filing system for your bills.[Edit]Taking Good Care of Yourself
Develop and maintain a daily routine for yourself. Try to wake up and go to bed at the same time each day and do things in roughly the same order each day. Keeping the same basic routine every day may help you to stay grounded and focused.[13]
For example, after you wake up you might take a shower, get dressed, go to school or work, and then hit the gym.
Add some physical activity to your daily life. Regular cardiovascular physical activity is good for you and it can also help you to feel happier in general. Strive for 30 minutes of exercise on 5 days of the week, and make sure that you do something you enjoy. This will help to increase the chances that you’ll stick with it.[14]
For example, if you enjoy going on walks outdoors, take a walk around your neighborhood on most days.
If you’re a fan of soccer, join an inter-mural soccer league at your local gym.
Adopt a healthier diet to promote better health and energy levels. Eating lots of unhealthy food can affect your mood and leave you feeling unhealthy and tired. To prevent this, eat a diet based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins. Stick to whole foods and steer clear of fried, sugary, processed, and packaged foods as much as possible.[15]
If you’re new to healthy eating, start by replacing one unhealthy item in your daily diet with a healthy alternative. For example, if you usually eat a bag of potato chips for an afternoon snack, try switching to apple slices.
Make sure that you don’t use food as a coping mechanism after your breakup. If you overeat or find yourself turning to junk food in the first few days after a breakup, that’s okay. However, if it becomes a regular habit, this can lead to weight gain and poor health.[16]
Use a relaxation technique daily to manage stress. It’s normal to feel stressed after a breakup, but there are ways you can reduce your stress levels and keep them in check. Choose a relaxation technique that you find helpful and set aside at least 15 minutes every day to use it. Some relaxation techniques you might find helpful include:[17]
Deep breathing
Yoga
Progressive muscle relaxation
Meditation
Check in on yourself and how you’re feeling daily. Try to be more mindful and focus your attention inwards at least once per day. Identify what you’re feeling, how these feelings are affecting you, and what might make you feel better. Sit and think about how you’re feeling, say what you’re feeling out loud, or try journaling about your emotions to check in with yourself.[18]
Try doing this after you get ready for school or work in the morning, or set aside a specific time later in the day to reflect on how you’re feeling.[Edit]References↑ https://www.insider.com/best-thing-to-do-to-get-over-an-ex-break-up-2017-8

↑ https://www.insider.com/best-thing-to-do-to-get-over-an-ex-break-up-2017-8

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/grief/dealing-with-a-breakup-or-divorce.htm

↑ https://www.redbookmag.com/love-sex/relationships/g4684/what-not-to-do-after-a-breakup/?slide=5

↑ https://www.insider.com/best-thing-to-do-to-get-over-an-ex-break-up-2017-8

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/grief/dealing-with-a-breakup-or-divorce.htm

↑ https://www.redbookmag.com/love-sex/relationships/g4684/what-not-to-do-after-a-breakup/?slide=3

↑ https://www.insider.com/best-thing-to-do-to-get-over-an-ex-break-up-2017-8

↑ https://www.insider.com/best-thing-to-do-to-get-over-an-ex-break-up-2017-8

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/grief/dealing-with-a-breakup-or-divorce.htm

↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-love-yourself-again-after-a-break-up-2018-3

↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-love-yourself-again-after-a-break-up-2018-3

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/grief/dealing-with-a-breakup-or-divorce.htm

↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-love-yourself-again-after-a-break-up-2018-3

↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-love-yourself-again-after-a-break-up-2018-3

↑ https://www.helpguide.org/articles/grief/dealing-with-a-breakup-or-divorce.htm

↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-love-yourself-again-after-a-break-up-2018-3

↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-love-yourself-again-after-a-break-up-2018-3

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Today in History for 13th March 2020

Historical Events

1878 – Oxford University defeats Cambridge University in their 1st golf match
1979 – European Monetary System is established, ECU created
1980 – Eric Heiden skates world record 1000m (1:13.60)
1986 – Soyuz T-15 carries 2 cosmonauts to Soviet space station Mir
1994 – 15th Big East Men’s Basketball Tournament: Providence beats Georgetown, 74-64
2019 – California Governor Gavin Newsom announces an indefinite moratorium on the death sentence in the state, saying it discriminates against marginalized communities

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1719 – John Griffin Whitwell, 4th Baron Howard de Walden, British field marshal, born in Oundle, Northamptonshire (d. 1797)
1947 – Tomas Hinojosa, jockey
1950 – Steve Hill, country vocalist (A Winning Hand)
1957 – John Hoeven, American politician, governor of North Dakota, born in Bismarck, North Dakota
1972 – Brian Saxton, NFL tight end (NY Giants), born in Whippany, New Jersey
1973 – David Draiman, American musician and songwriter (Disturbed), born in Brooklyn, New York

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1558 – Jean Fernel, French physician/physiologist, dies
1930 – Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman, American writer (Revolt of Mother), dies at 77
1938 – Nikolai Ivanovich Bukharin, Russian politician and intellectual, dies at 49
1946 – Abraham Bredius, Dutch art historian (Rembrandt), dies at 90
1987 – Gerald Moore, English pianist (Am I Too Loud), dies at 87
1996 – Brian Hulls, British TV news cameraman, dies at 48

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Become a Medical Physicist

A medical physicist is a technician who works with medical imaging technology to map out parts of the human body. Medical physicists aren’t medical doctors, but work closely with doctors in diagnosing and treating patients. A medical physicist’s salary is usually much higher than physicists working in universities or research institutions, making this an attractive career choice for many people interested in natural science.[1] To start this career path, pursue a college degree in physics and a master’s degree in medical physics. If you want to work in a university, continue on to a PhD. Then complete a 2-year residency to gain practical knowledge in the field. Complete 3 tests from the American Board of Radiology to get board-certified and practice as a licensed medical physicist.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Completing the Educational Requirements
Major in physics for your undergraduate work. The first step in becoming a medical physicist is establishing a firm background in physics. There are no undergraduate degrees in medical physics, so most students complete a BS in physics with some life science or medical electives to prepare them for graduate work. Earn your physics degree for an important step towards becoming a medical physicist.[2]
Take courses that involve laboratory and research work as well. You’ll be a stronger candidate for graduate programs if you have hands-on experience like this outside the classroom.
If you didn’t major in physics, a bachelor’s degree in engineering or a similar natural science could also qualify you for graduate study in medical physics.
Even though there are no undergraduate degrees in medical physics, some schools give recommended tracks to design a course program for students who want to pursue graduate work in medical physics. See if your school offers this service, or find a sample course track online.[3]
If you’re at all unsure on what courses will prepare you for graduate work in medical physics, speak with an adviser at your college.
Apply to CAMPEP-accredited Master’s degree programs in medical physics. The Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP) is responsible for certifying medical physics graduate programs. Explore certified MS programs and find out the admissions requirements for each. Usually, programs require your transcripts, a personal statement, and letters of recommendation. Some may also require an interview. Keep track of each program’s requirements and due dates so you submit all your applications correctly.[4]
Highlight any lab or non-classroom experience you have in your personal statement. Medical physics is a hands-on field, so graduate programs will like to see candidates with hands-on experience.
Keep your grades up during college to increase your chances of getting into graduate school. Many graduate programs require at least a 3.0 GPA for entry.
For a current list of graduate programs offering medical physics degrees, visit http://www.campep.org/campeplstgrad.asp.
Complete your MS degree in medical physics. Master’s programs in medical physics require 2 years of full-time study. Starting in the fall, these programs provide a rigorous schedule of classwork and practical lab or internship duties. At the end of the program, you may have to write a master’s thesis or take a comprehensive exam. Work through the program to obtain your MS degree in medical physics.[5]
Always work with your program adviser to design your program so you know the correct courses to take for your degree.
Some universities require an internship during the program as well. This provides hands-on training in the field and will help you build experience to find a job.
Programs require either a master’s thesis or a comprehensive exam to complete your master’s degree. Some give you a choice, and some require one or the other. Follow your program’s requirements to complete the degree.
Pursue a PhD if you want to enter university work. For most jobs in the medical physics field, an MS degree is all you need for entry. But if you want to work at a university, either as a teacher or a researcher, you’ll probably need a PhD. Find CAMPEP-accredited PhD programs, just like you did for your MS, and apply for entry. PhD programs usually require 30 more credits of coursework, a comprehensive examination, and a detailed research project that results in your written dissertation. This could all be 3-5 years or more of work. When you finish, you’ll be qualified to hold university positions in medical physics.[6]
Make sure your career goals require a PhD before making the commitment. You may be able to work with only an MS, meaning you won’t need several more years of schooling.
A PhD may also open new career opportunities in industry work as well. The degree isn’t required for entry-level work, but it may qualify you for promotions and pay raises later on. If you feel like your career reached a plateau, a doctorate may open new doors.[Edit]Getting Board Certification
Take part 1 of the American Board of Radiology (ABR) certification test. After you complete your MS degree, you’re qualified to take part one of the ABR’s certification test. This is a knowledge test based on the material in your MS coursework. The ABR accepts applications for the exam in the fall, and tests are administered at a Pearson testing center. Study and pass this test to move on in the certification process.[7]
Pearson testing centers are located throughout the US. Find the one closest to you by visiting https://home.pearsonvue.com/abr.
You have 5 years from the completion of your degree to take and pass this test.
For a content guide of what to expect on the first test, visit https://www.theabr.org/medical-physics/initial-certification/part-1-exam/content-guide.
The part 1 test is not required for getting residencies, but getting a good score on the test could increase your chances of getting the residency of your choice.
Complete a residency to qualify for full board certification. After completing your MS degree, you’re qualified for residency programs. These 2-year programs give you practical experience working in a clinical setting. This training prepares you to practice as a medical physicist independently. It also qualifies you to take the next 2 parts of the ABR certification test to become fully certified.[8]
The CAMPEP also accredits residency programs. For CAMPEP-approved residencies, visit https://www.campep.org/campeplstres.asp.
Different programs may have different application requirements and timelines. Investigate all the programs you’re interested in and keep track of their different requirements.
Residencies are competitive, and most programs only let in 1 or 2 residents per year. Apply to multiple programs to increase your chances of being matched.
Pass part 2 of the ABR certification test. After completing your residency, you’re qualified to take the second part of the ABR test. This is a practical test based on the knowledge you’ll gain in your residency. Questions cover working diagnostic machinery and applying therapeutic treatments. Apply for the exam when you’re finished with your residency and visit a nearby Pearson testing center to take it. If you pass, you’ll be able to take part 3 for full certification.[9]
For a part 2 study guide from the ABR, visit https://www.theabr.org/medical-physics/initial-certification/part-2-exam/part-2-diagnostic-content-guide.
Results take approximately 4-6 weeks to come in.
Get board-certified by passing the oral ABR test. Part 3 of the ABR test is an oral exam. Testers will ask you to apply the knowledge you’ve gained through your education to real-world problems. They are testing your practical problem-solving ability and communication skills. Apply for the exam on the ABR website. You’ll receive an invitation to take the exam 5 months before the exam date. Spend that time studying so you’re prepared. When you pass your oral exam, you’ll receive full board certification to practice as a medical physicist.[10]
Currently, the oral exam is only given at the ABR testing facility in Tucson, AZ. Confirm that this is the test location before making arrangements.
The oral test is unique to each person’s specialties. For a general guideline of what the ABR representatives may test you on, visit https://www.theabr.org/medical-physics/initial-certification/part-3-exam/content-guide.
Find medical physicist jobs by searching online job boards. Once you’re board certified, you can work independently as a medical physicist. Jobs are posted on internet job boards for specialized medical physics websites, as well as normal job sites like Monster. Find postings and submit your application materials to get a job in medical physics.[11]
Professional organizations like the American Institute of Physics and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine usually post jobs on their websites. Start on these sites for postings tailored to your expertise.
You can also search job postings at particular hospitals or universities. Some may not appear on other websites.
Remember to call some of your old professors, bosses, or contacts that you met throughout your education. They may know about job openings that aren’t posted yet.[Edit]References↑ https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes192012.htm

↑ https://college.mayo.edu/academics/explore-health-care-careers/careers-a-z/medical-physicist/

↑ https://as.vanderbilt.edu/physics/undergraduate/track-medical.php

↑ http://osu-wams-blogs-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/blogs.dir/2109/files/2016/02/Careers-in-Medical-Physics.pdf

↑ https://w3.aapm.org/medical_physicist/index.php

↑ http://osu-wams-blogs-uploads.s3.amazonaws.com/blogs.dir/2109/files/2016/02/Careers-in-Medical-Physics.pdf

↑ https://www.theabr.org/medical-physics/initial-certification/part-1-exam/requirements-application

↑ https://college.mayo.edu/academics/explore-health-care-careers/careers-a-z/medical-physicist/

↑ https://www.theabr.org/medical-physics/initial-certification/part-2-exam

↑ https://www.theabr.org/medical-physics/initial-certification/part-3-exam

↑ https://college.mayo.edu/academics/explore-health-care-careers/careers-a-z/medical-physicist/

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