How to Paint Gold

Gym bags, backpacks, and pocketbooks can all start smelling unpleasant over time. Fortunately, there are many ways to remove this odor and keep your bags smelling like new. Most pocketbooks and handbags aren’t washable, so use a variety of home deodorizing methods to absorb or mask unpleasant smells. If your bag is washable, a thorough cleaning in the machine can keep it smelling fresh.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Deodorizing Non-Washable Bags
Leave the bag outside to air it out. Sometimes, a good airing out is all a bag needs to smell better. Open the bag up and leave it outside for a day. Check it after a few hours to see if the smell has improved. If so, you don’t have to take further steps to mask odors.[1]
Pick a nice day to air the bag out so it doesn’t get rained on. Alternatively, you could leave the bag in your garage with the door open or a covered porch for a similar effect.
Remember to bring the bag back inside to really test the smell. You might not fully smell odors outside.
Wipe the inside of the bag with a vinegar solution to remove smells. Make a 1:1 solution of warm water and white vinegar. Add a drop of dish soap and stir it to make some suds. Then dip a clean sponge or rag into the mixture and squeeze it out. Scrub the inside of the bag with the damp sponge or rag, rewetting it as needed.[1]
Remember that the sponge shouldn’t be soaked. Make sure it’s only damp.
If you aren’t sure what type of material the bag is made of, put a small dab of this solution in a hidden spot and let it sit for a few minutes. If you don’t see any discoloration or damage, then it should be safe for the rest of the bag.
You can also load some plain vinegar into a spray bottle and lightly spritz the inside of the bag.
Apply a store-bought deodorizing spray if the smell remains. Open the bag up and spray a commercial odor eliminator, like unscented Febreze or Lysol, inside. Keep the bag open and let it air out. Once the spray dries, check to see if the odor is gone.[1]
You could use a scented product as well, but the smell may be a little overpowering.
If you’re cleaning a handbag, only spray the interior. It could leave a mark on the exterior, especially if the bag is leather.
Sprinkle household baking soda into the bag to absorb leftover odors. Baking soda can neutralize odors throughout your home, including inside your bags. Either sprinkle some into the bag, or put some in a plastic bag and leave it open inside the bag. Close the bag and give the baking soda a few hours to absorb the odors.[1]
You can also use a baking soda pod designed for refrigerators. This keeps the baking soda contained and you won’t have to worry about making a mess with it.
Leave kitty litter inside the bag for 1 week to absorb bad smells. Kitty litter contains deodorizing elements and can work similarly to baking soda. Place some in a cup or open plastic container and leave it in the bag. Seal the bag up and let the kitty litter absorb the odor for up to a week.[1]
Place the bag somewhere it won’t get knocked over. If the kitty litter spills out, it’ll be difficult to get it all out of the bag.
Use dry coffee grounds for a potpourri effect. Coffee grounds can absorb the odors and also provide a pleasant aroma to cover any remaining smells. Take a coffee filter and fill it halfway with dry coffee grounds. Twist the top and seal it with a rubber band. Then close the bag and leave it overnight to see if the smell improves.[1]
If you like the smell, you can leave the coffee grounds in the bag for a continuous effect. Put the filter in a safe place where it won’t break open.
You can try different coffee flavors, like French vanilla or hazelnut, for an even stronger effect.
Leave a dryer sheet in the bag to mask remaining unpleasant smells. If cleaning and deodorizing didn’t remove the smells completely, then leaving a dryer sheet in the bag at all times can mask any odors that are left over. Open up the sheet and spread it on the bottom of the bag.[1]
Take out the old sheet and add a new one when the fresh smell starts fading.[Edit]Washing Nylon and Canvas Bags
Check the care tag to see if the bag is machine-washable. Some bags, especially gym bags made of nylon, are machine-washable. Check the bag label for text saying “Machine Wash,” or a symbol showing a bucket of water. Both indicate that you can put this item in the washing machine.[1]
Most gym bags and backpacks are machine-washable, but check the label to confirm. Handbags usually aren’t machine-washable.
Washing tags may also have a symbol showing a bucket of water with a hand. This means handwash only. A bucket of water with an X over it means do not wash. These items are dry-clean only.
Shake the bag out to remove any solid material. Before placing the bag in the machine, make sure nothing is inside it. Turn the bag upside down over a garbage can and shake it to clear it out.[1]
This may also remove any fragments that were causing the odor.
If the inside of the bag is very dirty, use a handheld vacuum to clean it out before washing it.
Put the bag in the washing machine and run it through a normal wash cycle. Wash the bag by itself, not with a load of laundry. Close any zippers first so they don’t get caught. Use normal detergent and set the machine to a standard wash cycle with warm water.[1]
Make sure to remove any attachments, like detachable straps, before putting the bag in the washing machine. You can wash these attachments separately if you want to.
Add of white vinegar to the rinse cycle to kill the odor. White vinegar has odor-fighting properties. When the machine reaches its rinse cycle, pour in to remove any lingering odors.[1]
This is optional since normal detergent might get rid of all the odor.
Air-dry the bag completely before using it to prevent musty smells. Most bags aren’t dryer-safe, so place the bag outside to air-dry. Open the bag so the inside dries and you don’t get a lingering, musty smell.[1]
For faster drying, use a hair dryer on a low setting.[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
Wash your bag as soon as it starts smelling to prevent smells from building up. If you use the bag regularly, this will be every few months.[Edit]References↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JXvE444HZw&feature=youtu.be&t=45

Read More

Today in History for 16th March 2020

Historical Events

1527 – Battle of Khanua: Mughal Emperor Babur defeats Rajput forces led by Rana Sanga consolidating Mughal power
1861 – Confederate government appoints commissioners to Britain
1961 – 18th Golden Globes: “Spartacus”, Burt Lancaster, and Greer Garson win
1968 – General Motors produces its 100 millionth automobile, the Oldsmobile Toronado
1973 – Shah of Iran Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and Consortium members agree to nationalize all assets immediately in return for an assured 20-year supply of Iranian oil
2008 – 55th ACC Men’s Basketball Tournament: #1 North Carolina beats #22 Clemson, 86-81

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1920 – John Addison, English composer (Tom Jones-Acad Award), born in Surrey England (d. 1998)
1940 – Chuck Woolery, Ky, TV game show host (Love Connection)
1959 – Stan Thorn, singer (Shenandoah-Sunday in the South), born in Kenosha, Wisconsin
1963 – Jimmy Degrasso, American musician, drummer
1964 – Patty Griffin, American singer and songwriter (Downtown Church), born in Old Town, Maine
1986 – T. J. Jordan, American basketball player

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1485 – Anne Neville, English queen, wife of Richard III of England, dies at 28
1899 – Joseph Medill, mayor of Chicago (b. 1823)
1985 – Jean Purdy, British embryologist and nurse (pioneer in developing IVF), dies from melanoma at 39
1985 – Eddie Shore, Canadian ice hockey player, dies of a lung infection at 82
1991 – Jan H. van Roijen, Dutch ambassador to the U.S. and Netherlands Foreign Minister, dies at 85
1996 – Peter Clemoes, Anglo-Saxon scholar, dies at 76

More Famous Deaths »

Read More

How to Repair a Luggage Tear

Torn luggage is more than just an eyesore—if not addressed right away, it has the potential to lead to more severe damage, or even lost belongings. That’s why it’s important to act fast if you notice that the exterior of one of your bags or suitcases has ripped. Fortunately, all it takes is a needle and thread, a little fabric glue, or a suitably-sized patch to seal the breach and ensure lasting durability.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Sewing Small Tears
Thread a sewing needle with a heavy-duty type of thread. Most suitcases and travel bags are constructed of thick, hard-wearing fabrics, so it’s a good idea to use a thread that can hold up to the physical demands of constant packing, loading, and shuffling from place to place. Multi-ply polyester, cotton-wrapped polyester, or nylon upholstery thread should do the trick nicely.[1]
You’ll find many different varieties of thread at your local craft store, or any shop that carries sewing supplies.[2]
If all you have is regular thread, double it over on itself and tie the ends together to beef it up.
Weave the needle back and forth through both torn edges in a zig-zag pattern. Keep sewing until you reach the far end of the tear where the material is still intact. The closer together you situate your stitches, the more you’ll be able to make room for, and the more durable the finished seam will be.[3]
Avoid inserting your needle too close to the frayed edge of the tear, or the resulting stitch could come out easily.
This is nothing but your basic straight stitch, the most elementary technique in sewing.[4]
Tie off your thread 2-3 times to make sure the knot will hold. There are a couple of ways you can do this. The first is to slip your needle under your last stitch and pull it through the loop formed by the thread before snipping off the excess length. The other is to cut your thread a little long, then gather up the loose ends and tie a series of half knots by hand.[5]
Either of these methods will work just fine, as long as your knots are tight and neat.[Edit]Gluing Clean, Straight Tears
Apply a small amount of high-strength fabric glue to both sides of the tear. Start by separating the two sections of fabric as much as possible without doing any further damage. Then, carefully dab some glue onto the top of one section and the bottom of the other. Be careful not to accidentally spread the glue to any other part of your luggage.[6]
Make sure the glue you’re working with is suitable for use on fabrics. Many ordinary superglues aren’t effective on woven materials.[7]
Gluing both sides of the tear rather than just one will improve its chances of staying closed.
Align the top and bottom sections of the tear. Doing your best not to get glue all over your fingers, position the two edges so that the one with the glue on the bottom is directly above the one with the glue on the top. There should be a small amount of overlap between the sections.[8]
If you don’t overlap the fabric, the glue will have nothing to stick to but itself, and the tear will likely open back up before long.
Press and hold the two sections together for at least 2-3 minutes. Once you get the edges of the tear lined up properly, clamp them together between your fingers and apply firm, steady pressure. It should only take a few minutes for the glue to dry to the point where you can let go of the fabric without it coming apart.[9]
Be sure to apply additional glue as needed to any gaps or openings you notice in the mended fabric.
Keep in mind that the more glue you slather on, the longer it will take to dry.[Edit]Patching Large Rips and Holes
Purchase a fabric patch that matches your luggage. Shop around for a patch that approximates the look of your bag as closely as possible. Fabric patches come in a wide variety of colors and styles, so you shouldn’t have too much trouble finding one that fits the bill.[10]
Most fabric patches are made from cotton or polyester, and aren’t recommended for use on materials like nylon or rayon.
There are also leather patches available for renewing leather bags and suitcases.
Sew around the edges of ordinary fabric patches. Straight-stitch your way along the outer perimeter of the patch until you get back to your starting point, then snip your thread and tie it off 2-3 times to secure it. Provided you do this correctly, your finished patch should stand up to even the most crowded baggage claim terminals.[11]
For maximum durability, use an extra-thick type of thread, such as cotton-wrapped polyester or nylon upholstery thread. You can also double-up a strand of normal thread to increase its strength.[12]
Sewing your patch is the best way to guarantee that it will stay on.
Stick on patches with flat backs using fabric glue. Spread a liberal amount of high-hold glue onto the backside of the patch and carefully move it into place over the tear. Press down firmly on the patch for 30-60 seconds to make sure it will stay put. Afterwards, avoid handling the patch for at least 10 minutes as the glue begins to set.[13]
Other types of flexible, waterproof glues, like Gorilla Glue, multi-purpose industrial glue, or hot glue sticks, may also work for this project.[14]
Once the glue has had a full 24 hours to cure, it will be safe to expose your luggage to rain, sleet, snow, and other adverse weather conditions.
Heat iron-on patches for quick and easy repairs. Place the patch on the damaged spot and take a moment to get it positioned right where you want it while your iron heats up. Place a thin piece of cloth (such as a bandanna or pillowcase) over the patch and press the hot iron into the cloth for 30-45 seconds. If possible, flip the luggage fabric over and iron the other side as well to further cement the bond.[15]
Spraying the backside of the patch with a bonding agent can help lock it down for good.[16]
The backs of iron-on patches are coated with powerful adhesives that form a strong bond when activated by heat.[Edit]Tips
Each of the methods described here will work for rips, tears, and holes in your luggage’s inner lining as well as its outer shell.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Sewing Small Tears
Sewing needle
Thread
Scissors
Heavy-duty thread (optional)[Edit]Gluing Clean, Straight Cuts
High-strength fabric glue
Heavy object (optional—for clamping tear)[Edit]Patching Large Rips and Holes
Matching fabric patch
Sewing kit or needle and thread
Fabric glue
Clothes iron
Hand-cut custom fabric patch (optional)[Edit]References↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6u173Ap2mc&feature=youtu.be&t=52

↑ https://www.the-sustainable-fashion-collective.com/2014/04/09/choose-right-sewing-thread

↑ https://sewguide.com/clothing-repair-mending-tears/

↑ http://www.embroidery.rocksea.org/stitch/straight-stitch/straight-stitch/

↑ https://cyberseams.com/sewing/sewing-basics/how-to-sew-by-hand-basic-stitches/

↑ https://expertworldtravel.com/suitcase-repair-guide

↑ https://www.polaroidfotobar.com/best-fabric-glue/

↑ http://www.bforbag.com/luggage-repair-guide.html

↑ https://fabricglue.wordpress.com/

↑ https://expertworldtravel.com/suitcase-repair-guide

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWlDFDmzNp0&feature=youtu.be&t=201

↑ https://www.the-sustainable-fashion-collective.com/2014/04/09/choose-right-sewing-thread

↑ https://www.favecrafts.com/Wearable-Crafts/How-to-Attach-Patches-Without-Sewing-Gorilla-Glue

↑ https://www.dreamalittlebigger.com/post/glue-guide-use-the-right-glue-for-the-job.html

↑ https://www.whowhatwear.com/how-to-iron-on-patches

↑ https://www.sewcanshe.com/blog/2013/6/9/how-to-sew-on-patches-plus-a-no-sew-trick-for-pocket-patches

Read More