How to Make Edible Water Bubbles

An edible water bubble or bottle is water that has been solidified into a bubble-like shape. It is made from water, sodium alginate, and calcium lactate. If you prefer something more flavorful, you might enjoy a Japanese raindrop cake instead. The raindrop cake itself is flavorless, unless you sweeten it with vanilla sugar, or drizzle sweet syrup on top.

[Edit]Ingredients
[Edit]Edible Water Bubbles[1]
1 gram sodium alginate
5 grams food-grade calcium lactate
5 cups ( 1.2 L) water, dividedServes: varies

[Edit]Japanese Raindrop Cake[2]
3/4 cup (180 mL) water
1/8 tsp + 1/16 tsp agar powderToppings

1/2 to 1 tablespoon (2.63 to 5.25 g) roasted soybean flour (kinako)
1 to 2 tablespoons (15 to 30 mL) black sugar syrup (kuromitsu)Serves: 2 to 6

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Making Edible Water Bubbles
Mix 1 gram of sodium alginate with 1 cup (240 mL) of water. Use a kitchen or a digital scale to measure out 1 gram of sodium alginate. Place it into a bowl, then add 1 cup (240 mL) of water. Mix the 2 ingredients together using an immersion blender until the sodium alginate dissolves.
You can purchase sodium alginate online. It is a natural ingredient that comes from brown seaweed.
If you don’t have an immersion blender, you could try a regular blender or a whisk.
Don’t worry if the mixture develops air bubbles. These will go away as you prepare the other ingredients.
Mix 5 grams of calcium lactate with 4 cups (950 mL) of water. Pour 4 cups (950 mL) of water into a large bowl, separate from the first bowl. Add 5 grams of calcium lactate. Stir the 2 ingredients together with a spoon until the calcium lactate dissolves.
Make sure that you are using food-grade calcium lactate. It’s a type of salt used in cheese. You can buy it online.
Add spoonfuls of sodium alginate water into the calcium lactate water. Take a deep spoon, such as a sauce ladle, and scoop up some of the sodium alginate mixture. Hold the spoon over the surface of the calcium lactate mixture, then carefully tip its contents in. Do this a few more times until the bowl is filled.
Do not overcrowd the bowl with sodium alginate.
Stir the mixture for 3 minutes. Use a slender spoon to gently stir the contents in the large bowl. Keep stirring for 3 minutes. This will help activate the ingredients, and cause the sodium alginate to condense into “bubble” shapes.
Transfer the bubbles with a slotted spoon into a bowl of water. Fill a large bowl with plain water; the exact amount does not matter, as long as it is filled. Use a slotted spoon to remove the sodium alginate bubbles 1 by 1, and transfer them into the water. This will help stop the reaction.
Scoop the bubbles from the water with a slotted spoon. Set them down onto a plate or into a bowl. At this point, you can eat, drink, or slurp the bubbles up. You can also give them to young children to play with as a sensory activity!
Because these bubbles don’t contain much, don’t expect them to be very tasty![Edit]Making Japanese Raindrop Cake
Place 1/8 teaspoon plus 1/16 teaspoon of agar powder into a saucepan. Get out a set of measuring spoons. Use the 1/8 teaspoon to measure out 1 1/2 scoops of agar powder into a saucepan.
For best results, use Japanese-style “Cool Agar.” Do not use agar flakes.
Add a pinch of vanilla sugar if desired. Japanese raindrop cakes are supposed to be flavorless; you add the flavor with soybean flour and sugar syrup once you are ready to serve the cakes.[3] If you want a sweeter, less-traditional raindrop cake, add 1 pinch of vanilla sugar.[4]
Stir in 3/4 cup (180 mL) of water. Pour the water into the saucepan a little bit at a time. Stir the water with a spatula until the agar powder dissolves.
The traditional recipe calls for mineral water, but if you can’t find that, spring or filtered water will do.[5]
Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, then cook it for 1 minute. Set the saucepan on a stove. Turn the heat up to medium, and wait for the mixture to come to a boil. Cook the mixture for 1 minute, stirring occasionally, then take the saucepan off the stove.
The timing is important. If you undercook the mixture, the agar won’t dissolve. If you overcook the mixture, it will condense too much.[6]
Pour the mixture into spherical molds. You can use special molds made specifically for raindrop cakes, or you can use large, round silicone molds instead. If your mold is a 2-part mold that looks like a deep tray with wells in it, do the following:[7]
Fill the lower mold so that the wells overflow and the tray is half-filled.
Wait 2 minutes, then add a filling, such as an edible flower or strawberry.
Place the upper mold (with the holes in it) on top.
Press down on the upper mold until the excess gelatin flows out of the holes.
Chill the molds in the fridge for at least 1 hour. The raindrop cakes will be set within 1 hour, but nothing will happen if you leave them there longer. In fact, it would be even better if you left them there overnight.
How many cakes you end up making depends on how many cavities were in your mold.
De-mold the cakes as soon as you are ready to serve them. These jiggly treats will melt and lose their shape after only 20 to 30 minutes, so plan ahead. Once you are ready to serve the cakes, turn the molds upside down onto serving plates, and let the cakes slide out. Place each cake onto a separate plate.
Serve the cakes with soybean flour and black sugar syrup. Add 1/2 to 1 tablespoon (2.63 to 5.25 g) of roasted soybean flour next to each cake. Drizzle 1 to 2 tablespoons (15 to 30 mL) of black or brown sugar syrup over each cake. Alternatively, you can place the syrup next to each cake instead of drizzling it on top.
You can make your own black or brown sugar syrup. Follow a simple syrup recipe, but use brown sugar instead of white.
If you can’t find soybean flour and black sugar syrup, or if you simply don’t like them, drizzle some honey or agave nectar over the cakes instead.[8]
[Edit]Tips
Edible water bubbles and raindrop cakes are flavorless by themselves.
You can make raindrop cakes more flavorful by drizzling syrups on top.
Don’t worry if your raindrop cake does not end up perfectly clear. Use different amounts of water and agar powder next time.
You can try stirring some food coloring into a raindrop cake to make it look more interesting.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Edible Water Bubbles
2 to 3 bowls
Immersion blender or regular blender
Slotted spoon
Deep spoon (i.e. sauce ladle)[Edit]Japanese Raindrop Cake
Saucepan
Rubber spatula
Spherical mold[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://inhabitat.com/nyc/diy-video-how-to-make-an-edible-water-bottle/

↑ https://kirbiecravings.com/2016/06/raindrop-cake.html

↑ https://www.chopstickchronicles.com/rain-drop-cake

↑ http://www.kimberlyelise.com/raindrop-cake-recipe/

↑ https://kirbiecravings.com/2016/06/raindrop-cake.html

↑ https://kirbiecravings.com/2016/06/raindrop-cake.html

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5GNu4VheTc&feature=youtu.be&t=2m20s

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5GNu4VheTc&feature=youtu.be&t=5m30s

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Today in History for 18th March 2020

Historical Events

417 – Saint Zosimus begins his reign as Catholic Pope
1532 – English parliament bans payments by English church to Rome
1953 – 15th NCAA Men’s Basketball Championship: Indiana beats Kansas, 69-68; Jayhawks’ center B. H. Born is named tournament Most Outstanding Player
1972 – Ulster Vanguard hold a rally of 60,000 people in Belfast; William Craig tells the crowd: “if and when the politicians fail us, it may be our job to liquidate the enemy”
1995 – STS 67 (Endeavour 8) lands after 16½ days
2003 – British Sign Language is recognised as an official British language

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1548 – Cornelis Ketel, Dutch portrait painter/poet
1843 – Jules HPFX Vandenpeereboom, premier of Belgium (1899)
1927 – Lillian Vernon, founder and CEO of the Lillian Vernon Corporation (first company listed on US stock exchange started by a woman), born in Leipzig, Germany (d. 2015)
1929 – Christa Wolf, German novelist (Divided Heaven)
1966 – Jerry Cantrell, US rock guitarist (Alice in Chains-Dirt)
1982 – Chad Cordero, American baseball player

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1917 – William Shalders, South African cricket batsman (12 Tests 1895-1907), dies
1944 – Benjamin Delmonte, theater director and actor (Black Haired Whore), dies at 79
1965 – Farouk I, last King of Egypt (1936-52), dies at 45
1974 – David C Imboden, actor (King of Kings), dies at 87
1990 – Robin Harris, actor (House Party, Mo’ Better Blues), dies at 36
2016 – Jan Nemec, Czech film director (Diamonds of the Night), dies at 79

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Say Cheers in Irish

The standard way of saying “cheers” in Irish is “sláinte,” but there are many more terms and phrases you can offer in toast when speaking the Irish language. Here are a few of the most helpful to know.[1]
[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Standard Cheers
Exclaim “Sláinte!” This is the closest term you can use to toast someone “cheers!” in Irish Gaelic.
More accurately, the term “sláinte” translates into the English term “health.” When using this term, you are essentially toasting to someone’s health.
Pronounce this Irish term as slawn-cha.[2]
Offer “Sláinte mhaith!” This phrase emphasizes the well wishes of a standard “cheers.”
“Sláinte” means “health” and “mhaith” means “good.”
Translated directly, the term means “health good” or “good health.”[3]
You should pronounce this Irish phrase as slan-cha vah.
State “Sláinte chugat!” This variation on the traditional “cheers” is a bit more personal and individualized.
“Sláinte” means “health” and “chugat” means “you.”
When paired together in this manner, the English translation is “health to you.”[4]
Pronounce the Irish toast as slawn-cha hoo-ut’.
You can also use “chugaibh” for many people. Pronounced “hoo-uv”
Use “Sláinte agus táinte!” This phrase is another variant on the traditional “cheers” that emphasizes one’s well wishes for the person being toasted.
“Sláinte” means “health,” “agus” means “and,” and “táinte” means wealth.
Translated literally, the phrase means “health and wealth” in English.[5]
Pronounce this Irish phrase as slawn-cha ogg-uss tawn-cheh.
Give a hearty “Sláinte na bhfear agus go maire na mná go deo!” This version of the traditional cheers is more elaborate and works especially well when used amongst a group of friends.
“Sláinte” means “health,” “na” means “the,” and “bhfear” means “men.”
“Agus” means “and.”
“Go” means “that,” “maire” means “endure,” “na” means “the,” “mná” means “women,” “go” means “that,” and “deo” means “forever.”
When everything is strung together, the toast means, “Health to the men and may the women live forever.”
This phrase should roughly be pronounced, slawn-cha na var agus guh mara na m-naw guh djeo.[Edit]Additional Toasts and Well Wishes
Offer “Croí folláin agus gob fliuch!” This toast essentially offers a wish of health and drink.
Translated directly, the phrase means “a healthy heart and a wet mouth.”[6]
“Croí” means “heart,” “follain” means “healthy,” “agus” means “and,” “gob” means “beak” or “mouth,” and “fliuich” means “wet.”
Pronounce the phrase as cree full-in ah-gus gob fluck.
Exclaim “Fad saol agat, gob fliuch, agus bás in Éirinn!” This phrase expands on the wish for longevity and drink by also wishing the toasted a full life in Ireland.
As a direct translation, this phrase means, “long life to you, a wet mouth, and death in Ireland.”[7]
“Fad” means “length” or “long,” “saol” means “life,” and “agat” means “have you” or “you have.”
“Gob” means “beak” or “mouth” and “fliuch” means “wet.”
Agus” means “and.”
“Bás” means “death,” “in” means “in,” and “Éireann” is the Irish name for “Ireland.”
You should pronounce this phrase as fah-d seal, gob fluck, ah-gus boss in Air-inn.
Say “Nár laga Dia do lámh!” This toast is a wish for strength and endurance.
Translated directly, the phrase means, “may God not weaken your hand.”[8]
“Nár” means “not,” “laga” means “weak” or “weaken,” “Dia” means “God,” “do” means “to,” and “lámh” means “hand.”
You should roughly pronounce the phrase as Nar lah-ga Djee-ah duh lawv.
Use “Go dtaga do ríocht!” Offer this as a toast to prosperity.
Translated in a direct sense, it means, “may thy kingdom come.”
“Go” means “in,” “dtaga” means “come,” “do” means “to,” and “ríocht” means “kingdom.”
Pronounce this toast as guh DAG-uh duh REE-ukht.[Edit]Seasonal Cheers
Shout “Nollaig shona duit” at Christmas. This is essentially the Irish equivalent of toasting “Merry Christmas” in English.
“Nollaig shona” means “happy Christmas,” and “duit” means “to you,” so it directs the toast to the person being toasted.
Pronounce this seasonal toast as null-ig hun-ah ditch.
Use “Go mbeire muid mbeo ar an am seo arís” for New Year’s. This toast is appropriate to use on New Year’s Eve and wishes for health and prolonged life.
It translates roughly to, “may we be alive at this time next year.”
This is another phrase that is difficult to translate directly. The first part, “Go mbeire muid mbeo ar” means, “may we live again” and the latter part, “an am seo arís,” means “this time next year.”
You should pronounce this toast as go merr-ih-meedh mee-oh err on om shioh ah-reesh.
Say “Sliocht sleachta ar shliocht bhur sleachta” at a wedding. Offer this toast to the bride and groom to wish blessings upon their future family.
Roughly translated, the toast means, “may there be a generation of children on the children of your children.”[9] Essentially, you are wishing for the newlyweds’ family to continually expand and survive for many generations to come.
Pronounce this wedding toast as sluckt schlock-ta er shlucht voor schlock-ta.[Edit]Video
[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.irishcentral.com/opinion/niallodowd/meaning-irish-toast-slainte

↑ http://matadornetwork.com/nights/how-to-say-cheers-in-50-languages/

↑ http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/cheers.htm

↑ https://www.gaelicmatters.com/irish-blessings.html

↑ https://emerald-heritage.com/blog/2018/how-to-say-cheers-in-irish

↑ https://www.gaelicmatters.com/irish-birthday-toast.html

↑ http://www.irishpage.com/toasts/pubtoast.html

↑ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~irelandlist/phrases.html

↑ http://www.islandireland.com/Pages/folk/sets/toasts.html

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