How to Take Professional Photos of Yourself

Whether you’re applying for a job or looking for a new profile photo for social media, your portrait is where you make your first impression. A low-quality photo can make you look sloppy, unprofessional, and sends the message that you don’t care about presentation. On the other hand, a high-quality self-portrait draws the viewer in and incentivizes them to take a closer look at your photo, profile, and resume. Choosing an appropriate backdrop, using a great camera, and adjusting the camera’s settings based on your lighting is a solid recipe for success. With enough practice and patience, you’ll be able to emulate the look of professional photos in no time.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Choosing a Location
Shoot indoors for a standard headshot with a basic background. If you’re shooting professional photos for personal use, like for social media, choose any backdrop that you think will be interesting. If you’re shooting a professional headshot, choose a blank wall, shoot with bookshelves behind you, or hang a simple bedsheet behind you.[1]
To hang a sheet for a portrait, use tape or a curtain rod to hang the sheet vertically behind you.
If you want to add a little more attitude or personality to your image, feel free to shoot your business headshot against a textured or wallpapered wall.
Set your shot up next to a bright window and add lights as needed. Shoot during the day and set up your shot in a bright, sunny room. Use lamps, your camera flash, and ceiling lights to complement the light from your window. You can rent or buy a softbox for perfect portrait lighting if you’d like. Set additional light sources to the right or left of the camera to create dynamic shadows and highlights.[2]
If you use additional lighting sources, use light sources that produce white light, as opposed to yellow or blue light. A softbox is a professional piece of equipment that produces high-quality white light.
Take photos outdoors for a more dynamic, natural shot. Look for a nice backdrop outdoors where the background will match the tone that you’re aiming for in your image. Stairs, porches, and backyards can provide interesting locations for a self-portrait. If you’re shooting a headshot, a simple brick wall or city skyline can provide a standard backdrop that won’t stand out too much or dominate the image.[3]
Shoot outdoor photos during the day with the sun behind the camera. Shoot during the day when the sun is out to get bright, natural lighting. Choose an angle where you aren’t directly in front of the sun. Otherwise, your face won’t be illuminated. Avoid shooting around noon when the sun is high in the sky to avoid washing your image out in light.[4]
For a more dynamic look, shoot 15-45 minutes after sunrise or before sunset. These periods are known as the golden hours, and they’re the periods in the day when the light is softer and more radiant.
Avoid shooting in overcast conditions. It is difficult to achieve strong highlights and shadows if there isn’t much direct light outside.
Choose an outfit that matches the goal of your photo. If you’re taking self-portraits for personal use, you can wear whatever you want for your photo! Dress professionally for a business headshot. If you’re wearing a suit, make sure that it has been dry cleaned and ironed. If you’re going for a more traditional look, put a tie on. For a more contemporary, trendy look, skip the tie. If you’re wearing a dress, make sure that it is business appropriate. Wash, comb, and gel your hair the way you normally would for a job interview or important business meeting.[5]
if you’re in an industry that generally benefits from a less-formal look, feel free to dress a little more casually. Wear a trendier dress or a unique suit jacket without a tie. A sweater over a collared shirt can work as well. This would be appropriate for graphic designers, programmers, or writers.
Most business headshots are from the waist or chest and up. If you don’t plan on taking any full-body shots, feel free to wear some comfortable sweatpants or something like that.
Compare examples online or from coworkers to find what looks appropriate. Look at your boss’s headshot on social media to get a sense for what’s appropriate in your industry. If you can’t find it online, look for people in similar positions online. This is a great way to get a sense for where you should take your photo and how you should dress.[6]
If you’re looking for a new position or promotion, look at how the managers and directors in your field dress. For example, if you’re a mechanical engineer, look at how the head of engineering departments look in their headshots.
LinkedIn is great for this. Go on LinkedIn and browse profiles to compare how people present themselves in their photos.
This is less important if you aren’t shooting a business headshot since you can wear whatever you want.[Edit]Setting up the Camera
Use a DSLR camera or newer smartphone to get a high-quality image. A DSLR will give you more control over your image, but you can certainly use a phone with a high-quality lens if you that’s all you have available. It will be hard to get a high-quality image using a cheap camera or old phone. If you’re aiming for a professional look, it’s not worth wasting your time if you don’t have a great camera.[7]
Newer iPhones and Samsung models made after 2016 are known for having great cameras. If your phone’s camera has more than 12 megapixels (MP), the quality is likely very good. Megapixels refer to the number of pixels in each image. The more pixels there are, the more detailed the image will be.[8]
DSLR stands for digital single-lens reflex camera. DSLRs are the bulky cameras with big lenses that you see tourists and professional photographers using.
Set up your camera on a tripod or a flat, stable surface. Since you won’t be able take professional-looking photos while holding your camera, you’ll need a tripod or a flat surface to balance it on. Either attach your camera or smartphone to a tripod, or rest it on a flat surface, like a bookshelf, some books stacked on a table, a bench, or any other surface that’s high enough to capture your shot.[9]
Tripods for DSLRs are universal, and basically every camera should fit on a standard camera tripod. You can also get a tripod for your phone if that’s how you’re shooting your photos.
Set the shutter speed between 1/60-1/200 for a sharp photo. Shutter speed refers to how long the lens is exposed for an image. A faster shutter speed results in a sharper image, but requires a lot of light to illuminate the subject. A slower shutter speed will result in a brighter image, but things will be blurry if the camera and subject aren’t perfectly still. Keep the shutter speed at 1/60 or lower for a clear, sharp image.[10]
Prioritize shutter speed over the other settings for a business headshot. Raise the ISO or lower the aperture before you increase the shutter speed.
Turn the ISO to 100-400 for a clear, grain-free image. ISO stands for International Organization for Standardization. A higher ISO results in a grainer image, but requires a low exposure. A lower ISO will result in a higher-quality image, but requires a longer exposure. Start with the ISO at 100, 200, or 400 and make adjustments as needed based on the light you have available.[11]
Do not exceed 800 ISO. If you do, you’re going to end up with noise in your photo and it may look grainy. The only time you should exceed 800 ISO is if you’re shooting an artistic portrait and want the digital image to resemble film.
Adjust the aperture based on the depth of the image you want. Aperture, or f-stop, refers to the depth of field in an image. The lower the aperture, the blurrier images in the background will be. A high aperture requires a longer shutter speed. Unless you want to draw attention to something in the background, keep the f-stop under f/12.[12]
For an outdoor business headshot, set the aperture as low as you can (usually around f/2) to blur the background out. You want the emphasis to be on you, not the background.[Edit]Taking the Pictures
Place an item where you plan on standing and adjust the focus. Once you set your camera and lights up, put a chair, standing lamp, broom, or some other object in the location where you’re going to stand for the self-portrait. Then, either adjust the focus manually or use the automatic focus setting to bring your object into focus. This way, you know that you’ll be in focus when you replace the object for your portrait.[13]
On most phones, you touch the screen where the object is to put it into focus.
On a DSLR, the focus setting is typically on the side of the lens itself. “M” stands for manual while “A” stands for automatic. When it’s set to automatic, you press the shutter button halfway down and the lens will adjust accordingly based on what you’re looking at in the viewfinder.
Set the timer on your camera. Every camera has a delayed-timer setting which should give you enough time to move from the camera to the spot where you’re going to stand for the photo. Unfortunately, you will need to repeat this process every time you want to take a photo. To take multiple photos at once, connect an intervalometer or remote shutter to your camera and use that instead.[14]
An intervalometer is an automated attachment that you plug into your camera. Set it to take a photo every 1, 5, or 10 seconds to change your pose or facial expression after every shot. Intervalometers are typically used to make stop-motion videos or in time-lapse photography.
A remote shutter is an attachment that plugs into you camera. It comes with a clicker that you can click from anywhere to take a photo without being behind the camera.
Run to your mark and pose for the camera. Once you set the timer, move quickly to the spot where you’re taking your photo and pose. Position yourself so that you’re in the exact location where the object you used to set the focus. Take a breath and make whatever expression or gesture you’d like for your photo.[15]
For a business headshot, be sure to relax your arms at your side and stand up straight. Tense arms can make you hunch over a little, which can make you look dishonest or tired.
You can stuff your hands in your pockets if it makes it easier for you to relax.
If you’re shooting some artful self-portraits, feel free to make whatever facial expression you think works for the image you’re going for.
Review the results of your shot and adjust the settings as needed. Once you’ve taken a single shot, go back to the camera and review your image. Use this first shot as a metric for what settings or adjustments you need to make in terms of how you look and what the camera settings are. If the image is too dark, try raising the ISO 100-200 or lowering the shutter speed. If you’re blurry, readjust the focus. If the image is washed out in light, lower the ISO to 200-400 before moving the shutter speed down.[16]
It is extremely unlikely that your first photo will look right. Don’t worry–the closer you get to the right settings for your shot, the more likely you are to find the perfect self-portrait!
Continue taking photos until you have several portraits to choose from. Once you’ve adjusted your settings based on your first image, continue taking photos. Make adjustments as needed and shoot multiple images until you achieve your goal. Shoot at least 10-20 images to increase the chances that at least 1 of your portraits is excellent![17]
The more images you take, the more likely it is that you’ll capture something truly special. At the same time, it can take a long time to sort through hundreds of photos! Ideally, you should have at least 5 options to choose from.
Edit your photographs using professional editing software. If you know how to use a complex editing program like Photoshop, upload your photos and edit the ones you really like in your editing program. Otherwise, download a simple and free editing program like PhotoScape, Photoshop Express, or Gimp. Crop your images to get the best ratio between your body and the negative space, adjust the light levels, and apply filters as desired to improve the look of your photos.[18]
If the color of the lighting is off, change the white balance settings. To make your image brighter or darker, use the brightness or contrast settings to adjust the light in your photo.
Professional headshots typically don’t use flashy camera filters. If you really want to stand out and you’re in a creative industry, feel free to opt for a black and white filter, though!
If you’re using your phone, click the “edit” button in the gallery screen to change a photo. You can always edit photos from your camera in a computer program after you edit them, though.
In a professional headshot, there should probably be a 2:1 ratio between your body and the background. You want the focus to be on you, not the background.[Edit]Tips
Angle your chin slightly away from the camera to appear less flat in your self-portrait. This is a common technique that you can utilize to look more appealing and attractive.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Tripod
DSLR or phone camera[Edit]References↑ https://youtu.be/UrocO1xRn0s?t=38

↑ https://youtu.be/UrocO1xRn0s?t=38

↑ https://youtu.be/kJ3S4TYmHRM?t=175

↑ https://youtu.be/kJ3S4TYmHRM?t=175

↑ https://mckeephotography.com/what-to-wear-for-business-headshots/

↑ https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamarruda/2018/09/05/the-best-linkedin-headshots-and-how-to-create-yours/#173219286d2f

↑ https://www.popsci.com/do-you-need-a-dedicated-camera/

↑ https://www.techradar.com/news/best-cameraphone

↑ https://www.diyphotography.net/choose-best-tripod-photography-needs/

↑ https://www.techradar.com/how-to/the-exposure-triangle

↑ https://www.techradar.com/how-to/the-exposure-triangle

↑ https://www.techradar.com/how-to/the-exposure-triangle

↑ http://vision.cse.psu.edu/courses/CompPhoto/PhotoIntro.pdf

↑ https://cs.olympus-imaging.jp/en/support/imsg/digicamera/download/manual/omd/man_em10m3_e.pdf

↑ https://mckeephotography.com/what-to-wear-for-business-headshots/

↑ https://youtu.be/bqhPdLienLM?t=3

↑ https://youtu.be/aZPiuNjaeRg?t=26

↑ https://petapixel.com/2014/01/24/40-tips-take-better-photos/

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Today in History for 19th March 2020

Historical Events

1919 – Literary Magazine “Littérature”, edited by André Breton, Philippe Soupault, and Louis Aragon publishes its first issue
1982 – Falklands War: Argentinian forces land on South Georgia Island, precipitating war with the U.K.
1984 – John J O’Connor named 8th archbishop of New York
1987 – Fred Currey acquires Greyhound Bus Company
1989 – Men’s Figure Skating Championship in Paris won by Kurt Browning (CAN)
1995 – “Uncle Vanya” closes at Circle in Sq Theater NYC after 29 performances

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1589 – William Bradford, English separatist, Governor of Plymouth colony for 30 years (baptized), born in Austerfield, England (d. 1657)
1817 – Lewis Henry Little, Brigadier General (Confederate Army), (d. 1862)
1819 – David Henry Williams, American Brigadier General (Union Army), born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania (d. 1891)
1904 – Tadeusz Zygfryd Kassern, Polish composer and cultural attache, born in Lviv, Poland (d. 1957)
1955 – Bruce Willis, American actor (Moonlighting, Die Hard), born in Idar-Oberstein, West Germany
1964 – Barbara Lynch, American restaurateur (The Barbara Lynch Gruppo), born in Boston, Massachusetts

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1898 – João da Cruz, Brazilian poet, dies at 26
1918 – Willem H de Beaufort, Dutch historian/liberal politician, dies at 73
2004 – Mitchell Sharp, Canadian politician (b. 1911)
2008 – Paul Scofield, English actor (A Man for All Seasons and Quiz Show), dies from leukemia at 86
2008 – Hugo Claus, Belgian writer (Cool Lover, Sugar), dies at 78
2017 – Mary Maples Dunn, American college president (Smith College), dies at 85

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How to Come Out to Your Friends

Coming out to your friends can be scary, but it’s also a really exciting time in your life. Revealing your sexuality or gender identity allows you to live the life you want, but it’s normal to feel worried about how people are going to react. To make coming out to your friends easier, first decide who you feel comfortable telling. Then, plan what you want to say beforehand. Once you know what you want to say, announce your sexuality or gender identity in a way that’s comfortable for you. Additionally, be prepared to handle different types of reactions.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Deciding Who to Tell
Wait until you feel ready to come out. There’s no rush to come out, and you don’t owe anyone an explanation about your sexuality or gender identity. Give yourself as much time as you need to get comfortable with yourself before you reveal yourself to your friends. Your coming out should be on your own terms.[1]
In some cases, friends or family members might be asking about your sexuality or gender identity. You don’t have to answer them until you’re ready. You might instead say, “I’m not really worried about dating right now. Are you seeing someone?”
Some of your friends might feel ready to come out before you, and that’s okay! You don’t need to come out just because someone else has. Your journey is different from theirs.
Ask your friends about LGBTQ+ issues to see if they’re accepting. It’s normal to feel nervous about how your friends will react. Fortunately, you can test their reactions by seeing how they respond to LGBTQ+ topics. Bring up an LGBTQ+ character, news story, or issue, then ask your friends what they think about it. See if they seem supportive or possibly judgmental.[2]
You might say, “What did you think of Love, Simon?” “Were you shocked when Cheryl came out as a lesbian on Riverdale?” or “I’m confused about this same sex wedding cake debate. What do you think?”
If you’re transgender or nonbinary, you might say, “Have you read about the transgender bathroom laws? What do you think?” or “Have you ever questioned your own gender identity?”
Identify the friends you think will support you. Consider which of your friends seem supportive of same sex relationships, transgender people, and nonbinary people. Pick the people you think will be most supportive to tell first. As you tell more people, your supportive friends can be there for you as you come out to others.[3]
It’s possible that many of your friends will be supportive. However, it’s okay if you just start with a single friend. What’s important is that you feel comfortable with your coming out journey.
Postpone telling people you think will judge or reject you. While it’s not fair to you, some people may have trouble accepting your identity. This can be really painful, but it’s important to remember that this has nothing to do with you. If you suspect someone will react negatively, wait to tell them until you’re ready to deal with their reaction. Keep in mind that you never have to tell them if you don’t want to.[4]
For instance, you might have a friend who’s very vocal about their negative opinions regarding LGBTQ+ issues. It’s probably best not to tell them about your identity.
If you’re feeling hurt over losing friends who won’t accept you, remind yourself that true friends love you for who you are. You don’t need negative people in your life, and you will find friends who support you.
Make new friends in the LGBTQ+ community if you don’t have support. It’s okay if you feel nervous about trying to make new friends. Don’t worry about bonding with people right away. Just focus on meeting people through social events or online. Get to know them and try to make a connection. Soon, you’ll have new friends who love you for who you are.[5]
Go to LGBTQ+ events or Meetups in your area. Set a goal to meet people and say, “Hi.” Over time, you’ll make a few new friends.[Edit]Planning What to Say
Write down what you want to tell your friends. Think about everything you’d like to say, then jot down the ideas that seem most important to you. Pour out your heart and say how you feel about your friends. Then, revise what you’ve written so that it’s clear and concise.[6]
You might write something like, “Lately, I’ve been dealing with a lot of conflict inside myself, but recently I realized something really important. You’re one of my closest friends, so I want to be my true self around you. I hope that you’ll accept me for who I am. I’m gay, and I’m ready to live my life out and proud.”
Use a positive tone to show that you’re proud of who you are. Your sexuality or gender identity is part of you, so you have every right to be excited and proud to share it with people. Don’t let worries about how people will react make you feel ashamed or like you’re holding in a secret. As you plan what you want to say, keep your tone positive and celebratory.[7]
For instance, use an upbeat tone of voice while you’re speaking. Additionally, focus on how you’re sharing your truth rather than thinking of this as a dark secret.
Say only what feels comfortable to you. You are totally in control of what you say during your coming out. Don’t feel pressured to provide personal details or to explain yourself. Decide what you’re comfortable sharing, and stick to that.[8]
You don’t need to provide “proof” of your sexuality or gender identity. Similarly, you don’t need to explain how you realized your identity unless you want to do so. What you share is totally up to you.
Practice what you want to say so it’s easier to share with your friends. State what you want to say aloud so you can hear how it sounds. You might also sit in front of a mirror so you can practice telling it to someone else. Keep practicing until you feel comfortable with what you want to say.[9]
If something feels wrong, don’t be afraid to change it.
If you’re already out to a family member or best friend, ask them to help you practice. For instance, you might tell them what you plan to say and get their feedback.[Edit]Announcing Your Sexuality or Gender Identity
Tell your friends in person if you feel comfortable doing it face-to-face. If you’re comfortable coming out in person, doing it one-on-one or in small groups is an awesome idea. Ask your friends to meet you in a comfortable, private location. Then, tell them what you practiced.[10]
For instance, you might ask your friends out to dinner or could invite them over to your house.
Use props if you want to make it playful and fun. You get to set the mood for your coming out. If you want it to be more playful than serious, try adding props to your announcement. You might use a large banner or give your friends small items or gifts with your LGBTQ+ announcement written on them. In addition to keeping it fun, props also break the ice for you! Here are some ideas:[11]
Make a banner that says “I’m gay!” and stand under it.
Hand out cupcakes that say “Your Friend is Bi.”
Give your friends eggs filled with glitter, then ask everyone to break them just before you make your announcement.
Sing “I’m Coming Out” on a karaoke machine.
Come out in a text if you’re too nervous to say it in person. You might be too nervous to tell people in person, and that’s totally okay! Instead, type out everything you want to say into a text. Alternatively, send your friends a fun coming out meme. In addition to helping you feel comfortable, this gives them time to process the information and come up with a response.[12]
You could text them, “Hey, you’re one of my best friends, so I wanted to tell you something really important about me. I hope that you’ll accept me for who I am and be there for me. I’ve known for awhile that I’m a trans man, and I want to start living my life as my true self.”
Write a letter if you express yourself better on paper. A personal letter is an intimate way of expressing what you want to say without having to do it in person. Write or type all of the information you want to share as part of your coming out. Personalize letters to each of your friends so they understand how much they mean to you. Send the letters to your friends, then wait a few days before following up with everyone.[13]
Some of your friends might reach out to you right away. If this happens, listen to what they have to say and answer questions you feel comfortable with.
After about 2-3 days, contact friends you haven’t heard from. Say something like, “I wanted to talk to you about the letter I sent you. Have you read it?”
Make an announcement on social media to tell everyone at once. If you’re comfortable with everyone knowing your sexuality or gender identity, posting on social media might be a fun, easy way to come out to everyone. Type out an emotional message if that feels right to you, or post a fun LGBTQ+ photo. Explain that you’re proud of who you are and hope your friends will be supportive.[14]
Type something like, “I feel like it’s time for me to be honest with everyone. I’m gay and proud! I hope that everyone reading this can accept me for who I am and will support my coming out!”
You could also post a pic of you in your favorite rainbow outfit, holding a sign that says, “Hey! I’m Gay!”
Host a coming out party if you want to set a celebratory tone. If you enjoy being the center of attention, a coming out party might be the most fun way to tell your friends. Plan a party that’s as big or small as you feel comfortable with. Then, invite the friends you think will be supportive. Here are some party ideas to help you come out:[15]
Consider using rainbow decorations to signal to your friends that this is a coming out party.
Hang a banner that announces your sexuality or gender identity if that feels right to you.
Have a toast to give your coming out speech.
Decorate your treats with fun coming out statements, like “Gay AF” or “Who runs my world? Girls!”[Edit]Handling Different Reactions
Expect your friends to ask questions. Your friends are probably going to have questions, so decide what you’re comfortable addressing. Don’t feel pressured to answer any questions that make you uncomfortable. However, it’s helpful to provide answers to topics you’re open to talking about.[16]
For instance, your friend might ask, “How long have you known you were transgender?” You might say, “I realized I was really a guy when I was 3-years-old, but I haven’t felt comfortable talking about it until now.” Similarly, a friend might ask, “Are you sure you’re gay?” You could respond, “Yes, I’m definitely attracted to guys.”
Gently refuse to answer questions that are too personal. Let’s say your friend asks about your sex life. You might say, “I’m glad you want to know me better, but that’s not something I feel comfortable sharing. I hope you understand.”
Give your friends time to process your coming out. It’s common for your friends to feel shocked, even if they’re super supportive of the LGBTQ+ community. This doesn’t mean they’re pulling away or don’t accept you. It’s important to give them the time they need to think about what you’ve said and decide how to respond. Let your friends have time to think things over.[17]
Some of your friends might immediately reach out to you, and that’s awesome!
If your friends go quiet for a few days, give them a little space. After a few days, touch base with them to see if they’re open to talking. You might text them, “Hey! I just wanted to see how you were doing. Wanna chat?”
Don’t take negative responses personally. Unfortunately, some people may react negatively when you come out. This can be super painful, but it’s important to remember that they aren’t really rejecting you. Their reaction is about them, so try to separate yourself from it.[18]
Take a break from people who are making you feel bad about yourself.
If someone says a nasty comment to you, respond with something like, “I’m sorry that you hold that kind of hate in your heart,” “I’m sorry you feel that way,” or “It’s not okay for you to say these things to me.”
Ask your friends not to tell anyone else if that’s important to you. You have the right to decide who knows about your sexuality and gender identity. Your coming out should be on your own terms, so tell your friends what you’re comfortable with them sharing. This will help you control your own story and decide what labels apply to you.[19]
Say something like, “I’m telling you this because you’re one of my closest friends. However, I’m not ready for everyone at school to know, so please don’t tell anyone else,” or “I’m planning to come out to different people at different times. Please don’t discuss this with anyone else because I want to tell them in my own time.”
Focus on the positives because your identity is something to celebrate. There may be some difficult moments during your coming out process. Try not to let these issues get you down. Instead, think about what’s going right in your life and how awesome it will be to finally live the life you want.[20]
Make a gratitude list to remind yourself of what’s going well. Write down 3-5 things that you’re grateful for every day, then re-read your list when you’re feeling down.
Surround yourself with people who support you so you’re not worrying about people who are negative.
Don’t forget about online forums! If you’re not feeling supported in real life right now, look for pro-LGBTQ+ friends online. You’re not alone!
Recognize it’s okay to change your label as you grow. While some people instantly know their sexuality or gender identity, it’s okay if it takes you a while to fully understand who you are. Give yourself permission to be who you are on the inside, even if that means coming out again to the same group of friends. If they’re the right friends for you, they’ll support you every time![21]
For instance, you might think that you’re bisexual at first. However, you might later discover that you’re gay. Similarly, you might think you’re nonbinary but may decide that you’re actually transgender. It’s okay to re-label yourself![Edit]Tips
Make fun plans for the 2-3 days after your coming out because it may take your friends time to process what you’ve said. Instead of sitting around worrying about their reaction, have some fun!
If you haven’t accepted your sexuality or gender identity yet, you may be more likely to take negative reactions badly. Reach out to the LGBTQ+ community for support and to help you learn to love yourself. It also helps to see a counselor.
Don’t blame yourself if someone won’t accept you. Your sexuality or gender identity is part of who you are, and you have every right to live your life on your own terms.[Edit]Warnings
See a therapist if you’re feeling anxious or depressed over being LGBTQ+ or over the responses from your friends. Your therapist can help you work through your feelings and learn to love yourself. Additionally, they’ll help you build new friendships, if necessary.
Get help immediately if someone threatens you with violence. While it’s totally unfair, some people can be cruel.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Come Out to Strict Religious Parents When You’re Gay
Come Out As Transgender[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.teenvogue.com/story/how-to-come-out-to-your-friends

↑ https://www.teenvogue.com/story/how-to-come-out-to-your-friends

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.relate.org.uk/relationship-help/help-young-adults/common-problems/i-dont-know-how-come-out-my-family-and-friends

↑ https://www.relate.org.uk/relationship-help/help-young-adults/common-problems/i-dont-know-how-come-out-my-family-and-friends

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.teenvogue.com/story/how-to-come-out-to-your-friends

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.cosmopolitan.com/lifestyle/advice/a5960/fun-ways-to-come-out/

↑ https://www.relate.org.uk/relationship-help/help-young-adults/common-problems/i-dont-know-how-come-out-my-family-and-friends

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.teenvogue.com/story/how-to-come-out-to-your-friends

↑ https://www.teenvogue.com/story/how-to-come-out-to-your-friends

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.relate.org.uk/relationship-help/help-young-adults/common-problems/i-dont-know-how-come-out-my-family-and-friends

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.pflagatl.org/how-to-come-out-to-family-and-friends/

↑ https://www.relate.org.uk/relationship-help/help-young-adults/common-problems/i-dont-know-how-come-out-my-family-and-friends

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