How to Wear a Dress Shirt Untucked

Although untucked shirts aren’t a great option for formal events, they can add a layer of polish and style to a casual ensemble. Before selecting a dress shirt to wear, compare the garment against a few basic guidelines to see if it can be untucked. Then, you can experiment with different sweaters, jeans, and various kinds of shoes until you find a casual or formal outfit that works well for you!

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Choosing the Right Dress Shirt
Select a shirt that only goes down to your zipper. Try on your dress shirt in front of a mirror, so you can see how long the shirt tails are. While you don’t have to measure the garment, see if the hem drifts below the middle of your pant’s zipper. If the shirt is long and baggy, set it aside and try on a different garment. Additionally, check that the shirt doesn’t ride up on your midsection.[1]
Untucked dress shirts look best when they’re shorter in length overall.
Lift up your arms to see how long or short your garment is. If your shirt lifts up to the point where you can see your midsection, then you shouldn’t wear it untucked.
Untuck shirts that have a straight hemline. Examine the bottom section of your shirt to see if it’s straight or curved. While many dress shirts can be worn tucked or untucked, note that shirts with curved, uneven seams with obvious shirt tails are designed to be tucked into your pants.[2]
Shirts with curved hemlines and shirt tails are designed to be tucked into dress pants, and are typically worn with jackets or blazers, or as part of a suit ensemble.
Shirts with straight hems can be squared-off or curved along the bottom.
Opt for dress shirts with loose collars to create a casual outfit. Pinch the fabric of your collar to see how stiff or loose the material is. If the collar is stuffed or made with an especially sturdy fabric, set the shirt aside for a more formal occasion. If the collar is loose, then you can repurpose the shirt for a business-casual or everyday look.[3]
Shirts with tight, stiff collars are more designed to be paired with ties, dress pants, suits, and other formal attire.
Pick out dress shirts that comfortably fit so you can look professional. Try on different garments to see if they fit over your back, shoulders, and midsection without being too tight or baggy. If the shirt is too loose, you might look unpolished. However, if you choose a garment that’s too tight, your outfit might come off as awkward and uncomfortable. If the dress shirt doesn’t fit properly, don’t wear it untucked.[4]
To ensure that your clothing fits comfortably, take some basic measurements and compare them to a sizing chart. This can help give you a better idea of what size shirt is best for your body type.
Gauge the formality of the event before attending in an untucked shirt. Think about the purpose of your outing and determine if it’s a fancy or casual event. If the event is considered black-tie, be sure to tuck in your dress shirt. If you’re going out for drinks or to a casual party, then you’ll be fine going out with an untucked shirt.[5]
Always err on the side of caution when planning an outfit. If you aren’t sure if the occasion is formal or casual, leave your dress shirt tucked in.
For instance, you’ll probably want to tuck in your shirt when attending a wedding, unless the event is explicitly described as a relaxed, casual.[Edit]Creating a Casual Outfit
Roll up your sleeves for a more casual, on-the-go look. If you’re leaving your shirt untucked, there’s no reason to leave your arms constricted by long shirt sleeves! Take the cuff of your shirt sleeve and roll it backwards until you reach your elbow. Try to roll your sleeves evenly on both sides, so your outfit still looks polished and professional.[6]
If you’re planning an outfit for warmer weather, choose a short-sleeved dress shirt or polo shirt instead.
Pair an untucked dress shirt with jeans to give off a casual vibe. Choose a comfortable pair of jeans in your preferred style. As you put the outfit together, check that the dress shirt doesn’t fall below the middle of the zipper. You can finish off the outfit with a formal or casual pair of shoes, depending on your own personal preference.[7]
For instance, try pairing a blue-patterned dress shirt with dark blue jeans. Create a relaxed look by rolling up the sleeves, or add a formal touch by sliding on a watch.
Belts are an acceptable accessory to wear with an untucked shirt.[8]
Keep the top 2 buttons undone to give yourself some breathing room. If you’re not wearing a tie or similar accessory, you don’t need to keep all of your dress shirt’s buttons secured into place. Instead, leave the top buttons open, while the rest are still secured into place. If you’d prefer to create a more polished look, only leave the top collar button undone.[9]
Leaving the top button tied will make your outfit stiff and uncomfortable.
Pick sneakers or athletic shoes to create a more casual look. If you’re planning to be on-the-go, opt for a pair of shoes that fit comfortably and provide you with a lot of mobility. If you don’t like wearing sneakers or trainers, opt for tennis shoes or another type of comfortable footwear.[10]
For example, try pairing a short-sleeved, untucked dress shirt with a pair of jeans and some comfortable tennis shoes.[Edit]Building a Dressier Ensemble
Wear a dress shirt with nice pants or chinos to a formal setting. Instead of choosing a pair of baggy pants, opt for a pair of chinos or dress pants that have a sleek, professional look. Choose soft, muted colors that work well in an office or other professional atmosphere, like dark green or tan. For an especially comfortable and stylish ensemble, choose an untucked, short-sleeve dress shirt to complete your outfit.[11]
Belts, watches, and aviators are great accessories to try with this type of outfit.
For example, try pairing a blue short-sleeved dress shirt with a pair of green chinos, along with professional, neutral-toned desert boots.
Slip on a sweater to create a stylish ensemble. Add an extra layer of warmth to your outfit during the colder months by slipping a sweater overtop of an untucked dress shirt. Be sure to select a dress shirt that fits correctly and doesn’t fall over the midsection of your pants zipper.[12]
While some people prefer to tuck in dress shirts beneath a sweater, there’s nothing wrong with the bottom of the shirt being visible beneath the garment.
For example, try slipping on a dark green sweater over a white dress shirt. Pair these items with a pair of jeans, along with a comfortable pair of loafers.
For instance, a pair of loafers can go well with a pair of dark jeans.
Avoid wearing jackets or blazers with an untucked shirt. While untucked shirts are a comfortable option for social gatherings and casual, everyday outfits, don’t try to mix them into your especially formal attire. If you’re choosing to wear a suit or blazer of any kind, keep your shirt tucked into the waistline of your pants.[13]
If you’re trying to stay warm, opt for a casual jacket or coat instead.
Choose loafers if you’re headed to a fancier location. When adding the finishing touches to your outfit, look for a pair of shoes that add a layer of polish to your outfit without appearing over-the-top. If you’re headed to a party or other social gathering, slip on a pair of loafers to compliment the relaxed style of your untucked dress shirt.[14]
Since an untucked shirt is only used for relaxed, casual occasions, you don’t need to slip on fancy dress shoes or wingtips.[Edit]References↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cRXMwQePhg&t=1m14s

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exVu1iapzUk&t=2m15s

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cRXMwQePhg&t=2m52s

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diwccqFt6iU&t=1m1s

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exVu1iapzUk&t=2m44s

↑ https://www.today.com/style/heres-one-reason-you-shouldnt-wear-untucked-shirt-office-t48946

↑ https://www.today.com/style/heres-one-reason-you-shouldnt-wear-untucked-shirt-office-t48946

↑ https://wellbuiltstyle.com/how-to-wear-a-short-sleeve-button-up-shirt-with-style/

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cRXMwQePhg&t=1m43s

↑ https://hr.az.gov/sites/default/files/media/Dress-Code-05312018.pdf

↑ https://wellbuiltstyle.com/how-to-wear-a-short-sleeve-button-up-shirt-with-style/

↑ https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/313269

↑ https://www.gentlemansgazette.com/overrated-underrated-dress-shirt-details/

↑ https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/313269

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Today in History for 21st March 2020

Historical Events

1863 – Naval Engagement at Havana, Cuba: USS Henrick Hudson vs Confederate blokcade runner Wild Pigeon
1909 – Moran and MacFarland (US) wins Europe’s 1st 6 day bicycle race (Berlin)
1987 – PSV sells soccer player Ruud Gullit to AC Milan (Ÿ17 million)
1995 – New Jersey officially dedicates the Howard Stern Rest Area along Route 295
2018 – China announces greater controls over the media, including merging state-run radio and television broadcasters into a single conglomerate called “Voice of China”
2019 – Governor of Missouri Mike Parson declares a state of emergency as flooding from Nebraska and Iowa flows downstream into the state

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1768 – Jean-Baptiste-Joseph Fourier, mathematician/Egyptologist
1901 – Richard Leslie Hill, historian
1934 – Al Freeman Jr, Tx, actor (One Life to Live, My Sweet Charlie), (d. 2012)
1955 – Jean Marie Hon, actress (Jane-Man From Atlantis), born in San Francisco, California
1962 – Matthew Broderick, American actor (WarGames, Biloxi Blues), born in NYC, New York
1975 – Mark Williams, Welsh snooker player

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1656 – Armagh James Ussher, Irish Archbishop of Armagh (claimed world began 4004 BC), dies at 76
1734 – Robert Wodrow, Scottish historian (b. 1679)
1992 – Natalie Sleeth, American composer, dies at 61
1998 – Galina Ulanova, Russian prima ballerina assoluta (b. 1910)
2007 – Drew Hayes, American writer and graphic artist (b. 1969)
2015 – Jackie Trent, English singer-songwriter (Neighbours theme) and actress, dies at 74

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Make Chai Tea

Although chai has its origins in India, this flavorful black tea is popular around the world. To make homemade chai with a bold flavor, crush your own spices and steep them with black tea bags and milk. If you don’t feel like measuring your own spices, buy flavored chai tea bags from the store and pour hot water over the bag to brew the tea. For the speediest mug of chai, create a powdered chai tea mix that you can dissolve in water or milk.

[Edit]Ingredients
[Edit]Chai Tea from Scratch
8 green cardamom pods
8 cloves
4 whole black peppercorns
2 cinnamon sticks
A piece of fresh ginger
of whole milk
of water
4 plain black tea bags
Sugar, to tasteMakes

[Edit]Brewing Chai Tea Bags
1 chai tea bag
of water
of milk
1 1/2 teaspoons (10 g) of honey
1 teaspoon (4 g) of sugarMakes

[Edit]Homemade Chai Mix
2 ½ teaspoons (4.5 g) of ground ginger
2 teaspoons (4 g) of ground cinnamon
¾ teaspoon (1.5 g) of ground cloves
¾ teaspoon (1.5 g) of ground cardamom
1 teaspoon (2 g) of ground allspice
1 teaspoon (2 g) of ground nutmeg
½ teaspoon (1 g) of finely-ground black pepper
1 ½ cups (187 g) of unsweetened instant tea or decaffeinated instant tea
1 ½ to 2 cups (300 to 400 g) of sugar
1 cup (125 g) of nonfat dry milk powder
1 cup (125 g) of powdered nondairy creamer
1 cup (125 g) of French vanilla-flavored powdered nondairy creamer
1/2 cup (59 g) of unsweetened cocoa powder, optionalMakes 5 ½ cups (704 g) of mix

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Making Chai Tea from Scratch
Use a skillet to crush cardamom, cloves, and peppercorns. Put 8 green cardamom pods, 8 cloves, and 4 whole black peppercorns into a sealable plastic bag and press the air out. Seal the bag and press a heavy skillet or rolling pin on it to crush the spices.[1]
If you have a mortar, put the spices into it and use the pestle to crush the spices until the pods open.
Peel a piece of ginger and slice it into pieces. Use the edge of a spoon to scrape the peel from a piece of fresh ginger. Carefully cut it into thin slices that are thick.[2]If you can’t find fresh ginger, substitute 1 teaspoon (2 g) of ground ginger.
Place the spices, cinnamon sticks, and ginger in a saucepan. Put the crushed spices into a medium saucepan on the stove. Add two cinnamon sticks and the sliced ginger.[3]There’s no need to crush the cinnamon sticks since you’ll strain them out along with the spices. They’ll add a strong, spicy flavor to your tea.
Add of milk and of water. Pour the whole milk and water into the saucepan with the spices. Although you can use low-fat milk, using whole milk gives your tea a richer, creamier taste.[4]Feel free to substitute alternative milk, such as soy, oat, or almond milk.
Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat. Turn the burner on and keep the lid off of the saucepan. This helps you see when the mixture begins to boil. You can stir it occasionally to distribute the spices.[5]Heating the spices in the milk will make the tea more flavorful.
Add 4 tea bags and turn off the heat. As soon as the liquid reaches a boil, turn off the burner. Open 4 black tea bags and place them into the saucepan with the liquid. Press down on each tea bag with the back of a spoon to submerge it completely.[6]
Cover the saucepan and steep the tea for 10 minutes. Put the lid on the pan so the tea doesn’t cool and set a timer. Steep the tea until the liquid becomes a deep, pinkish-tan color.[7]
You can stir the tea occasionally to prevent the spices from settling as the tea steeps.
Strain the tea and sweeten it according to your taste. Set a fine-mesh strainer over a teapot or large measuring jug. Slowly pour the chai tea through the strainer and discard the solids. Then, taste the tea and stir in as much sugar as you like.[8]Put the lid on the saucepan and refrigerate leftover chai tea for up to 3 days.
Use your favorite sweetener. You could try honey, agave, or stevia, for instance.[Edit]Brewing Chai Tea Bags
Bring of water to a boil. Fill a kettle or saucepan with water that hasn’t been boiled before and set it on the stove. Using fresh water gives your tea the best flavor. Then, turn the burner to high so the water comes to a boil.[9]
If you prefer, heat the water in an electric kettle.
Put 1 chai tea bag in a mug and pour in the boiling water. Open 1 chai tea bag and put it in a large serving mug. Carefully pour of the boiling water into the mug so the tea bag is saturated.[10]Try your favorite variety of storebought chai tea bags. You could use decaffeinated, chai green tea, or herbal chai tea, for instance.
Steep the tea for 4 to 6 minutes before you remove the bag. Stir the tea occasionally to distribute the chai tea seasonings in the water and set a timer for at least 4 minutes. The longer you steep the tea, the more flavorful the chai will be. Remove the tea bag once the tea has brewed as long as you like.[11]For even stronger chai tea, leave the tea to steep for up to 10 minutes.
Stir in the honey and sugar. Pour in 1 1/2 teaspoons (10 g) of honey along with 1 teaspoon (4 g) of sugar. Stir the sweeteners well so they dissolve into the tea. Then, taste the tea and add more honey or sugar if you want the tea even sweeter.[12]You could substitute agave, stevia, or low-calorie sweetener for the honey and sugar.
Pour in of milk. If you don’t mind your chai tea cooling off a little, stir in the milk while it’s cold. For hot chai tea, warm the milk in a saucepan on the stove or microwave it for about 30 seconds before you add it to your mug of tea.[13][Edit]Making Chai Mix Powder
Put all of the spices into a large bowl. If your spices are over 6 months old, buy new spices so they have a bolder flavor. Measure each of the following spices and add them to the bowl:[14]2 ½ teaspoons (4.5 g) of ground ginger
2 teaspoons (4 g) of ground cinnamon
¾ teaspoon (1.5 g) of ground cloves
¾ teaspoon (1.5 g) of ground cardamom
1 teaspoon (2 g) of ground allspice
1 teaspoon (2 g) of ground nutmeg
½ teaspoon (1 g) of finely-ground black pepper
Whisk in instant tea, sugar, milk powder, and the nondairy creamers. Use 1 ½ cups (187 g) of unsweetened or decaffeinated black tea and add between 1 ½ and 2 cups (300 to 400 g) of sugar, depending on how sweet you like your chai. To make your chai mix milky, whisk in 1 cup (125 g) of nonfat dry milk powder, 1 cup (125 g) of powdered nondairy creamer, and 1 cup (125 g) of French vanilla-flavored powdered nondairy creamer.[15]If you don’t want to buy 3 different powdered products, use a total of 3 cups (375 g) of any 1 of these ingredients.
Store the mix in an airtight container until you’re ready to drink it. Your chai mix is good to use for up to 6 months. Keep it in your pantry in an airtight container, like a jar or a sealable bag, for maximum freshness.[16]
Remember to label the container so you know when to use the mix by.
Dissolve (16 g) of mix in of boiling water to make a mug of tea. To make a quick cup of chai tea, carefully pour the boiling water into a large mug. Then, stir in the powdered mix until it’s completely dissolved. If you’d like even creamier chai tea, use milk or a combination of milk and water.[17]If you added cocoa powder to the mix, use hot milk instead of water.[Edit]Tips
For a cool treat, blend ¼ cup (32 g) of chai tea mixture with of milk and 3 ½ cups (525 g) of vanilla ice cream.[18][Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Chai Tea from Scratch
Sealable plastic bag
Heavy skillet or rolling pin
Spoon
Knife and cutting board
Saucepan with lid
Fine-mesh strainer
Serving mugs[Edit]Brewing Chai Tea Bags
Kettle or saucepan
Measuring cups and spoons
Spoon
Large serving mug
Small saucepan, optional[Edit]Homemade Chai Mix
Measuring cups and spoons
Large bowl
Spoon
Airtight container
Mug[Edit]Related wikiHows
Brew Kung Fu Tea
Prepare Oolong Tea
Make Bouquet Garni[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/homemade-chai-201226

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-peel-and-mince-fresh-ginger-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-182774

↑ https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/easy-chai-tea-recipe

↑ https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/easy-chai-tea-recipe

↑ https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/easy-chai-tea-recipe

↑ https://www.realsimple.com/food-recipes/browse-all-recipes/easy-chai-tea-recipe

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-a-chai-tea-latte-242520

↑ https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-a-chai-tea-latte-242520

↑ https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/222513/chai-tea-latte/

↑ https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/222513/chai-tea-latte/

↑ https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/222513/chai-tea-latte/

↑ https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/222513/chai-tea-latte/

↑ https://brewedleaflove.com/chai-tea-latte/

↑ https://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/chai-tea-mix

↑ https://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/chai-tea-mix

↑ https://www.cookinglight.com/recipes/homemade-chai-tea-mix

↑ https://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/chai-tea-mix

↑ https://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/chai-tea-mix

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