How to Hang Pictures Without Nails

Hanging pictures is a great way to decorate and personalize a space. But there are many places where you may want to hang a picture but can’t use nails, perhaps because you don’t want to leave large holes in the wall, can’t drill or hammer through the wall, or will be changing your pictures or their arrangement frequently. This is when it comes in handy to know how to hang pictures without nails, which you can do with tacks, various adhesive products, and other ingenious solutions. There are several methods to choose from, and you can decide what will work best for you depending on your supplies and circumstances.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Using Picture Hanging Strips
Remove hanging hardware. Adhesive picture hanging strips need flat surfaces to work properly, so remove any protruding hanging hardware that has been installed on the back of the picture.[1] This includes nails, screws, wires, keyhole or sawtooth fasteners, or anything else that could make the back surface of the picture uneven.Adhesive picture hanging strips (as well as adhesive nails and hooks) can be found in office supply stores, craft stores, hardware stores, and online.
Clean your surfaces. Adhesive picture hanging strips require a clean surface to stick properly, so wipe down your picture and the wall where you’re going to hang it with a clean cloth and isopropyl alcohol.[2]Allow the surfaces to dry before applying the strips.
Apply the strips. For each set of strips, press the two different sides together. One set at a time, remove one liner and press the adhesive to the back of the picture. Continue pressing for 30 seconds. Repeat until the required strips have been applied.One set of strips will hold up to three pounds (1.36 kg), and most 8×10-inch (20×28 cm) pictures. If you only need a single set of strips, position it at the top center of the picture.
Two sets of strips will hold up to six pounds (2.7 kg), and most 11×17-inch (28×44 cm) pictures. Position one set of strips at each top corner of the picture.
Four sets of strips will hold up to twelve pounds (5.4 kg), and most 18×24-inch (46×61 cm) pictures. Position one set of strips at each top corner of the picture; position another set on each side of the picture, two-thirds of the way down from the top.[3]
Affix the picture to the wall. First, remove the liner on the outside of the strips to reveal the adhesive. Then, press the picture against the wall. Slowly separate the strips on the picture from those on the wall by gently pulling on the bottom corners of the picture and lifting. With your fingers, press the strips against the wall for 30 seconds.[4]
Wait one hour. This allows all the adhesive on the strips to set and dry. When the hour is up, replace the picture back onto the wall by lining up the strips. [Edit]Using Adhesive Hooks or Nails
Clean your wall. Like picture hanging strips, adhesive hooks and nails require clean surfaces, so wipe down the wall with a clean cloth and isopropyl alcohol, then let it dry.Adhesive hooks or nails have adhesive backings that stick to walls, so that you can mount pictures using the hanging hardware attached to the picture. Depending on the hardware on your picture, make sure you purchase the appropriate adhesive hanging equipment.
Prepare the adhesive. Remove the liner from the adhesive strip and affix it to the hook or nail.Some adhesive hooks come with the adhesive already affixed to the back. Skip this step and move on to the next if that’s the case with the adhesive hook you have.
Affix the adhesive hook or nail to the wall. First, remove the liner from the back of the adhesive that’s attached to your hook or nail. In the place where you want your picture hung, firmly press the adhesive hook or nail against the wall for 30 seconds.[5]
Wait an hour for the adhesive to dry. When the hour is up, hang your pictures normally based on the hanging hardware installed.Make sure you know the weight of your picture before you purchase adhesive nails, as they generally only hold between five and eight pounds (2.26 and 3.6 kg), while smaller hooks may only hold one or two pounds (0.45 or 0.9 kg).
To hang a picture that’s heavier than what your adhesive nails or hooks are rated for, use more than one. Ensure the weight gets distributed evenly by using a level during installation.[Edit]Using Press-in Hooks
Choose your hooks. There are several brands that make hooks that are designed to be inserted into drywall without hammers, nails, or any other tools. These include Hercules Hooks, Super Hooks, Monkey Hooks, and Gorilla Hooks.[6] They are made of different materials and rated to hold varying weights, but each one does require making a small hole in the wall. According to the manufacturers:
A Hercules Hook can hold as much as 150 pounds (68 kg).
A Super Hook can hold up to 80 pounds (36.28 kg).
A Monkey Hook can hold up to 35 pounds (15.87 kg).
A Gorilla Hook can hold as much as 50 pounds (22.67 kg).
Install your hooks. Push the long, curved (not kinked), tapered end of the hook through your drywall. Once you’ve pushed it most of the way in, position it so the small hook on the outside will be facing upright (so that you can hang things from it). Set it in place by pushing it in the rest of the way.[7]
Hang your picture. Most press-in hooks come in packs of four or more. To hang heavier pictures using two hooks, measure the width of the picture and divide it into thirds. Place one hook at the one-third mark, and a second hook at the two-thirds mark. For even heavier pictures that require three hooks, measure the picture and divide it into quarters. Place one hook at the one-quarter mark, one hook in the center (two-quarters), and one hook at the three-quarter mark. [Edit]Using Tape or Reusable Adhesive
Select your adhesive. Double-sided tape will work to affix lightweight pictures to walls, though it’s not necessarily designed for that job and may strip paint when it comes off. Reusable adhesive, also known as sticky tack or poster tack, is designed to affix lightweight pictures to walls, but it can get gummy over time and be difficult to remove.
Reusable adhesives and tapes are strong enough to hold loose pictures or posters (not in a frame), but are not designed to hold much more than one pound (0.45 kg).
Single-sided tape can be converted into makeshift double-sided tape by taking a strip of tape, making it into a loop with the adhesive side out, and fastening the ends of the tape together to close the loop.
Prepare the wall. Adhesives will work best with clean surfaces, so wipe down your wall with a clean cloth and isopropyl alcohol. While waiting for that to dry, wipe down the back of your poster or picture with a clean, dry cloth.Wash your hands before handling reusable adhesive to prevent transferring dirt or oil onto it.
Prepare your picture. Lay your picture face down on a flat surface. Press small balls of reusable adhesive or small squares of double-sided tape to the corners of your picture (on the back of the picture). If you’re hanging a larger picture, frame the back outside edge with adhesive or tape.
Mount your picture. Once you’ve got your tape or adhesive in place, pick up the picture, line it up on the wall, and press it against the wall to affix the adhesive or tape to the wall. [Edit]Hanging a Picture String
Find existing wall fixtures. Look for hooks, screws, vents, or knobs that are already in place and that could bear a few extra pounds. Note that this method will be most appropriate for lightweight pictures that aren’t in frames.
Look for wall features that are out of the way and that could have a string run between them without posing a strangulation risk.
Tie on your string. Cut a length of string, twine, or wire that’s long enough to span the distance between the two wall fixtures, plus some extra for tying knots. Tie each end of the string to a separate wall fixture. You can either pull the string taut or leave it slightly loose and droopy.
A taut string will look more rigid and uniform, while a droopy string will look more relaxed and artistic. The choice between the two is a matter of aesthetic preference.
Wire will be harder to tie than string or twine (it will be easier to wrap it tightly around your fixture than tie it), will provide an industrial look, and will allow pictures to slide around for quick re-positioning. Wire is thin and strong, but doesn’t lend itself to the droopy look.
Twine and string will be easy to tie, can be left droopy or pulled taut, and will provide a more rustic look.Twine will be thicker than wire or string, but stronger than string. String will be thinner than twine, but not as strong.
Hang your pictures. Use clothespins or clips to affix your pictures to the string.[8] If your string begins to sag more than it’s supposed to or the knots won’t stay tied, you may have too much weight. Either use stronger twine or wire, or tie a second string to different fixtures for a second row of pictures.
To distribute weight and pictures evenly, place your first picture in the center of the string using your eye or a tape measure. Using the first picture as the center point that separates two halves, divide those halves in half again, and place one picture at each center point. Continue dividing your spaces in half and using the center points as picture locations until all your pictures are hung.[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
A corkboard that’s already in place or propped up against a wall or furniture can be used to display pictures.
Thumbtacks can be used to hang loose pictures, posters, or very lightweight framed pictures with wire hangers, as long as you can put small holes in the wall.
Framed or loose pictures can be displayed by being propped up against mantles, bookshelves, furniture, or other objects, or placed in standing frames.[Edit]Related wikiHows
Hang Pictures
Hang a Picture
Make a Picture Clothesline
Hang a String of Pictures on a Wall
Map out Where to Hang Pictures[Edit]References
Videos provided by Home Staging by Tori Toth
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.housetweaking.com/2013/03/01/easy-frame-hanging-no-nails-or-tape-measure-required/

↑ http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/658807O/commandtm-instructions.pdf

↑ http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/658807O/commandtm-instructions.pdf

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJ9RZt0_qMk

↑ http://multimedia.3m.com/mws/media/658816O/commandtm-instructions.pdf

↑ http://doesitreallywork.org/picture-hanger-reviews/

↑ http://doesitreallywork.org/super-hook-review/

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IRU4DZSqdow

Read More

Today in History for 26th March 2020

Historical Events

1943 – Elsie S Ott becomes 1st woman awarded US Air Force Medal
1944 – 705 British bombers attack Essen
1956 – Red Buttons debuts on TV in Studio One
1981 – Police and Albanian demonstrators battle in Kosovo, Yugoslavia
1987 – August Wilson’s “Fences” premieres in NYC
1995 – 15th Golden Raspberry Awards: “Color of Night” wins

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1896 – Richard Flury, Swiss composer, born in Biberist, Switzerland (d. 1967)
1908 – Kenneth Mellanby, entomologist
1940 – Bill Ind, Bishop-designate (Truro)
1941 – Yvon Marcoux, Quebec politician
1971 – Behzad Ghorbani, Iranian zoologist and sociobiologist
1973 – T.R. Knight, American actor

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1546 – Thomas Elyot, English diplomat, dies at about 56
1857 – Wei Yuan, Chinese scholar and geographer of Qing Dynasty, dies at 62
1933 – Eddie Lang [Salvatore Massaro], American jazz guitarist known as the “father of jazz guitar”, dies at 30
1973 – Noël Coward, English playwright (Hay Fever, Private Lives), director (In Which We Serve-1942 Academy Award), actor and singer, dies of heart failure at 73
1996 – Tom Wakefield, British writer, dies at 60
2006 – Anil Biswas, Indian politician (b. 1944)

More Famous Deaths »

Read More

How to Store a Bike

Whether you have an expensive bike that you use every day or a cheap bike that you take out occasionally, it’s important to store it securely. Think about your storage needs to determine where to keep your bike when you’re not using it. Then, choose a storage rack so your bike isn’t leaning against a wall. With a little care and consideration, your bike will be safe and sound until you’re ready to ride.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Choosing a Storage Location
Use your garage to easily store multiple bikes. If you have space in your garage, it’s a great way to store bikes so they’re not in your way. A garage is more secure than storing your bike outside and you don’t have to worry about bringing a wet bike into your home.[1]
To make it easier to get your bike in and out of the garage, designate a bike-only space so it doesn’t get blocked by storage containers, vehicles, or clutter.
Designate a small shed for your bike if you don’t have garage space. Clear space in an outdoor shed if you want to park 1 or more bikes. The shed protects the bike from extreme weather and you can lock the door to secure your bike.[2]
If you don’t have space in your yard, consider placing a bike shed on an unused parking space.
Set up a bike tent for an inexpensive and portable storage option. If you don’t have a small shed on your property but you have outdoor space, buy a lightweight bike tent. You can quickly set this up just like a standard tent, but it’s designed to fit 1 or 2 bikes.[3]
Keep in mind that although a bike tent protects your bike from rain or wind, it’s not a secure way to store your bike for a long time.
Keep your bike indoors if you don’t have a garage or outdoor space. If you don’t have a yard or garage, you’ll probably need to get creative with storing your bike inside. If your house or apartment has stairs, try hiding it under them or devote a small workroom to storing the bike.[4]
You can display your bike and make it part of your home’s decor. Consider hanging it on the wall in one of your main living spaces. You can even buy or make a bike display shelf.[Edit]Picking a Storage Rack
Purchase a floor stand if you only want to store 1 bike. If you’re looking for a simple storage solution that doesn’t require you to lift or move the bike, buy a bike floor stand. This looks like a long metal bar that bends up at 1 end. To store your bike, roll the front or back wheel into the middle of the stand and it will stay in place.[5]
Floor stands are a good option if you’re storing the bike indoors, in a shed, or in a bike tent.
Choose a vertical stand if you want to take up less storage space. Look for a bike stand that has a vertical pole and clamp near the top. Lift up the bike so you can clamp the seat post in place. This raises the bike up a little so only 1 tire is on the ground.[6]
You can use a vertical bike stand indoors, in a bike shed or tent, or in the garage.
This is also a good option if you don’t want to install a hook or mount to your wall or ceiling.
Install a hook, hinge, or mount to the wall if you want to keep the bike off of the floor. If you don’t have a lot of space and don’t want your bike resting on the ground, buy a hook to screw into the wall. You could also purchase a hinge or horizontal wall mount that installs directly into the wall. Then, lift your bike by the frame or wheel so it hangs on the mount.[7]
For example, if you use a horizontal wall mount, you’ll lift the bike up so both ends are suspended by the mount. If you’re using a hook, you’ll probably need to hang just 1 of the tires by the hook so the bike dangles.
Install a ceiling-mounted pulley if you want to maximize storage space. If you have limited space in your garage or entryway but want to store your bikes inside, buy a ceiling-mounted pulley. Hook a clamp attached to a rope to each end of your bike. Then, pull on the rope so the pulley raises the bike to the ceiling.[8]
This is a good option if you want to be able to park cars in your garage without your bike getting in the way.[Edit]Protecting Your Bike from Damage
Avoid leaning the bike against a wall. Always use a storage rack when you’re not using your bike instead of propping it against a wall or immovable object. Propping the bike can damage the frame, gears, and seat over time. Your bike can also fall over since it’s not secure.[9]
Leaning the bike puts pressure on parts, which can cause them to loosen.
Drape a tarp above the bike to protect it from dust and moisture. Hang a thin tarp over the bike so it’s suspended above the bike. If you can, drape the tarp over something that’s taller than the bike so it doesn’t come into contact with the bike. Then, secure the bottom of the tarp in place with bungees, stakes, or rope.[10]
If you completely encase the bike in a tarp, the material can trap moisture which causes the bike to rust.
Put a full bike cover over your bike if you’re storing it for a long time. Purchase a bike cover made of a stretchy elastic material that conforms to the shape of your bike. Cover the bike if you plan to store the bike outside or in your garage for the long term.[11]
The cover prevents the bike from getting scratched, stained, or faded. Most are waterproof too, which prevents the bike from rusting.
Use at least 1 type of lock to keep your bike secure. If you’re storing your bike anywhere outside, it’s a good idea to lock it with a heavy-duty lock. Buy a “U” or “D” shaped lock and thread it through the frame so you can lock it to an immovable object. To make it harder to steal, thread heavy chains or a cable lock through the wheels and secure them to the object.[12]
Avoid using locks that are thin since these are easy to cut.
Clean and prep the bike if you’re storing outside for the long term. Take off any electronic parts that might stop working because of exposure to moisture or extreme cold. Then, clean your bike with water and dry it thoroughly. Spread a lubricant on parts of the bike that might rust, such as the bolts, drivetrain, or spokes.[13]
You can also spray a rust-inhibitor if you have a steel-frame bike.
Remember to thoroughly clean the bike and pump up the tires before you plan on using it again.[Edit]Tips
If you’re still unsure about how to store your bike, check your local cycling center or bicycle club for ideas.[Edit]References↑ https://rebootmygarage.com/garage-storage-ideas/best-way-to-store-my-familys-bicycles/

↑ https://youtu.be/fg__D12_BsQ?t=292

↑ https://youtu.be/p1N3HCYoHvM?t=665

↑ https://youtu.be/lTIDw6gSM4k?t=246

↑ https://youtu.be/uOs1F_swahw?t=94

↑ https://youtu.be/uOs1F_swahw?t=109

↑ https://youtu.be/uOs1F_swahw?t=159

↑ https://youtu.be/uOs1F_swahw?t=247

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/repair/g20004453/4-surprising-ways-youre-hurting-your-bike-0/

↑ https://www.bicycling.com/repair/a20009645/what-happens-when-you-leave-your-bike-outside/#

↑ https://youtu.be/rNLb3WU-9oM?t=32

↑ https://www.iii.org/article/bicycle-safety-and-insurance

↑ https://mynorthernbackyard.com/can-i-store-my-bike-or-the-kids-bikes-in-my-backyard/

Read More