How to Set Up Solitaire

Most card games require a large group of people to enjoy, but Solitaire is designed for solo players. The game is a great way to pass the time and can provide hours of entertainment. Once you know the board layout and rules, it takes less than a minute to set up and can be assembled almost anywhere.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Dealing Your Cards
Shuffle the deck. To play Solitaire, you will need a traditional 52-card pack of standard playing cards. Open your pack and discard the instruction and Joker cards. Before you start dealing, shuffle the cards a couple of times to make sure that the deck is all mixed up.
Deal seven cards in a row. Deal the first card and place it face up on your left-hand side. Then, deal six more cards face-down in a row to the right of this card so that each card has its own spot.
When you are finished, you should have seven cards total. The first one on the left should be facing up and the other six should be facing down.
The cards that you are dealing are called your “Tableau.” These are the main cards that you will use to play solitaire.[1] When you are finished dealing all of the cards, your Tableau will look similar to an upside down staircase.
Skip the first card and then deal six cards. Next, you will need to deal six more cards onto the stacks. Place the first card face up on the second stack of cards from the left. Then, deal one card face down card onto each of the stacks moving to the right.[2]
Count over to the third card and then deal five cards. Starting with the third stack over from the left, deal one card face up. Then, deal four more cards facing down on each of the stacks to the right of this stack.[3]
Deal four cards starting with the fourth stack. Starting with the fourth stack over from the left, deal one card face up onto this stack and then deal three cards facing down. Place one card onto each of the stacks to the right of this stack.[4]
Skip the first four cards and deal three. Count over to the fifth card from the left in your row of seven card stacks. Deal one card facing up on this stack and then deal one card facing down onto each of the two stacks to the right.[5]
Count over to the sixth card and then deal two. Next, count over to the sixth stack from the left and deal one card facing up onto this stack. Then, deal one card facing down onto the stack to the right of this stack. This stack should be the last one in your row of seven.[6]
Deal one last card face up. There should only be one stack left that does not have a face up card on it. This stack should be all the way on the right of your Tableau. Deal one card onto this stack facing up. Now this stack should have six cards facing down and one on top that is facing up.[7]
After you have dealt this last card, your Tableau is complete! Dealing the Tableau is the hardest part of setting up solitaire, so the next part will be easy.[Edit]Placing the Rest of the Cards
Place the remaining cards face down. After you have finished setting up your stacks, you can place the cards that you have left just above the Tableau on the left-hand side. This will be your “Stock” or “Hand” pile. You will draw cards from this pile as you play the game.[8]
If you want to be extra sure that the cards are shuffled, then you can shuffle them again before placing your Stock pile. This is optional though.
Identify the space for your discard pile. The discard pile, also known as the “Talon” or “Waste” pile, is where you will discard any cards that you draw and cannot use.[9] At the start of your game, the Talon pile will be empty. Reserve a space next to your Stock pile to create your Talon pile during gameplay.
The Talon pile is usually just to the right of the Stock pile.
When you have exhausted your Talon pile, you can flip it over (face down) onto the Stock pile space again and continue playing.
Leave room for your Foundation piles. The Foundation piles are where you will place the cards that you will clear from the Tableau stacks as you play solitaire. At the start of your game, your Foundation piles will be empty, so you just need to reserve some space above your Tableau. Leave enough room to place four stacks of cards as you play.[10][Edit]Playing a Game
Learn the object. If you have never played solitaire before, then you will need to take a few minutes to learn how to play solitaire first. The object of a game of Solitaire is to transfer all of the cards in the deck and in the tableau stacks to your foundation piles.[11] You begin the game with nothing in these piles and arrange cards in these stacks going from lowest to highest and separated by suit.[12]
For example, one stack might begin with the ace of spades, so only the two of spades can be placed in this stack next. You cannot place the three of spades until the two of spades is in place.
Draw and place cards. You will need to draw and place cards to play. Draw one card at a time and either play it on one of your stacks or discard it if you cannot use it. You can play a card on one of your tableau stacks if the color and sequence are right.[13] The colors need to alternate between red and black.
For example, if one stack has a five of hearts on it and you draw a four of clubs, then you could play the four of clubs on the five of hearts.
Move and flip face-up cards. You can move cards between stacks to expose face-down cards. When a face down card is exposed, then you can flip it over and use it.
For example, if one stack has a five of hearts on it and another stack has a six of spades on it, then you could move the five of hearts to the six of spades stack. This will expose a face-down card that you can then flip over and either leave it in place or use it.
Reuse the discard pile. When you have exhausted the discard pile, then you can flip over the stack and begin using those cards again. Continue to draw one card at a time and to flip the deck each time you go through it.
Transfer cards to the foundation piles to clear them. As you expose cards and draw cards, you will be able to transfer them to the foundation piles above your tableau stacks. Remember that each pile needs to begin with an ace card and there should only be one stack per suit.[14]
When each stack contains an ace through king set, then you will have won the game![Edit]Learning Rules and Variations
WH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5eab90b2468c0’)Solitaire Rule SheetWH.shared.addScrollLoadItem(‘5eab90b2475c5’)Solitaire Variations
[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Deck of cards (multiple decks for multi-player Solitaire)
Table or other playing surface[Edit]Related wikiHows
Play Blackjack
Play Poker
Play Gin Rummy
Play Speed[Edit]References
[Edit]Quick Summary↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/#sthash.dIyqUlpw.dpuf

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.cardgamesolitaire.com/solitaireInstructions.php

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

↑ http://www.bicyclecards.com/how-to-play/solitaire/

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Today in History for 30th April 2020

Historical Events

1725 – Emperor Charles VI and King Philip IV of Spain sign Treaty of Vienna
1937 – The Philippines holds a plebiscite for Filipino women on whether they should be extended the right to suffrage; over 90% would vote in the affirmative
1939 – NBC/RCA 1st public TV demo with FDR at opening of NY World’s Fair
1954 – Darius Milhauds 4th Concert for piano and orchestra premieres in Haifa
1976 – Muhammad Ali beats Jimmy Young in 15 for heavyweight boxing title
2018 – World’s oldest known spider, a female trapdoor, dies after being killed by a wasp sting in Western Australia, aged 43

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1896 – Anandamayi Ma [Nirmala Sundari], Indian spiritual leader, born in Kheora, British India (now Bangladesh)
1912 – Manuel Gutiérrez Mellado, Deputy Prime Minister of Spain (1976-81) and Minister of Defense (1977-79), born in Madrid (d. 1995)
1938 – Juraj Jakubisko, Slovak film director (Crucial Years), born in Kojšov, Czechoslovakia
1952 – Jacques Audiard, French film director
1957 – Aviva Chomsky, American historian, daughter of Noam Chomsky
1987 – Rohit Sharma, Indian Cricketer

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

535 – Amalaswintha, queen of Ostrogoths, murdered in the bath at about 37
1795 – Jean-Jacques Barthélemy, French writer and numismatist (b. 1716)
1900 – Casey Jones, American railroad engineer, dies at 36 heroically in Cannonball Express train wreck
1983 – Muddy Waters, US blues singer/guitarist (Mad Love), dies at 70
1996 – Julio Cesar Mendez Montenegro, President of Guatemala (1966-70), dies
2017 – Ueli Steck, Swiss mountain climber, dies in a climbing accident in Nepal at 40

More Famous Deaths »

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How to Repair Faux Leather

Faux leather is also known as imitation, synthetic, or artificial leather. It has a similar appearance to natural leather, but faux leather items typically consist of a fabric base with a polyurethane coating. This composition means that faux leather will inevitably peel and crack over time, in which case there are different methods you can use to repair it. With a few leather repair supplies and the right techniques, you can restore most faux leather items to prolong their usability, though they won’t last forever.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Covering Peeling or Cracking with Leather Paint
Peel off all the loose pieces of the faux leather. Use your fingers to pull off any loose flaps of the faux leather that are sticking up from the item. Stop when you can’t peel any more off.[1]
You can use a blunt-edged object, such as a butter knife, to help you peel up and scrape away the loose bits of faux leather if it is difficult to do with just your fingers.
This method works for all types of faux leather items that are peeling or cracking including furniture, clothing, and accessories. Keep in mind that it will likely only temporarily restore the appearance of the faux leather and it won’t make it look brand new. You will eventually be better off replacing the item.
Wipe down the peeled section and surrounding area with a leather wipe. Open up a can of leather wipes and pull out a single wipe. Rub it all over the spot you just peeled and the surrounding faux leather to clean the surface for painting.[2]
Leather wipes are specifically formulated for cleaning leather and work well on faux leather, but you could also use a different kind of gentle cleaning wipe, such as a baby wipe.
Choose an appropriately-colored acrylic leather paint. Select a color of acrylic leather paint that closely matches the color of your faux leather item. Acrylic leather paint is available online, at craft stores, and at leather supply shops.[3]
If you can’t find the right color of acrylic leather paint, you can mix multiple colors together to make a color that closely matches the faux leather.
Brush on the leather paint horizontally using a small paintbrush. Pour a bit of your chosen paint out into a plastic cup and dip a small paintbrush, like the kind used for art, into the cup to get some paint on it. Spread the paint over the peeled area in long horizontal strokes.[4]
If there are different sections of faux leather of varying sizes that you want to repair, it can be helpful to have several small paint brushes of different sizes to paint smaller and larger damaged areas.
Let the paint dry for at least 30 minutes. Wait 30 minutes and then gently poke the painted area with a fingertip to see if it is dry to the touch. Let it dry longer if it is still sticky until it feels totally dry.[5]
You can use a hair dryer to speed up the drying process if you want. Set it to medium heat and hold it about away from the painted surface, then move it slowly back and forth across the painted patch until it is dry.
Paint on additional coats until you are happy with the finish. Use your paint brush to apply more coats of the same color. Allow each coat to dry before applying the next one.[6]
Pay special attention to certain areas that might require more paint to blend the repaired area in, such as around the edges where the paint meets the existing faux leather and any spots near seams.
Add a clear acrylic finisher top coat to seal the paint job. Choose a matte, glossy, or semi-gloss clear acrylic finisher based on how shiny the existing faux leather is. Use a clean paint brush to apply the clear acrylic finished over the entire painted area and the surrounding edges using long horizontal strokes.[7]
Don’t worry if the acrylic finisher looks white when you first apply it as it will dry on clear.
Watch out for any runs or droplets as you go and wipe them up with your paintbrush.
Let the item dry overnight before you use it. Leave the item alone until the next day so the top coat has plenty of time to cure. Make sure that nobody else uses the item if it is something communal like a sofa.[8]
Remember that your faux leather will not look perfect when you examine it up close, but from a distance it will look much better than before when it was peeling and ugly.[Edit]Fixing Minor Peeling with Leather Dye
Put on a pair of latex gloves. Use a pair of well-fitted latex gloves like the kind doctors wear. This will protect your skin from getting stained but allow you to use your fingertips to effectively apply the dye.[9]
This method works best for small damaged areas where the faux leather is just starting to peel or crack.
Choose an appropriate color of leather repair dye. Pick out a dye color that closely matches the color of the faux leather item you want to repair. Leather repair dye is available online or at leather repair shops.[10]
You can use leather repair dye to color exposed fabric that the faux leather has peeled away from as well as to stick loose pieces of the faux leather back down.
Shake up the bottle and cover the damaged area with dye. Ensure that the cap is on tightly, then shake the bottle up and down to mix the dye. Open up the cap on the bottle of dye and tilt it upside down over the peeling or cracking area. Squeeze out enough drops of dye to cover the exposed material underneath the faux leather.[11]
The dye will absorb into the fabric, so go ahead and apply it generously. You don’t need to worry about putting too much.
Work the dye underneath any loose pieces of faux leather. Use a fingertip to carefully lift up any loose flaps of peeling faux leather. Spread the dye around underneath the flaps so it soaks into all the exposed fabric underneath and gets on the undersides of the flaps.[12]
Apply more dye as needed while you do this until there is enough to get it all over the damaged area and the color of the exposed fabric looks dark enough.
Press the loose pieces of faux leather down into the wet dye with your fingers. Carefully poke all loose flaps of faux leather back down against the dyed fabric with your fingertip. Rub them gently towards the center of the damaged area to smooth them out.[13]
The leather repair dye also acts as an adhesive, so the loose flaps will be stuck down once the dye dries.
If you purchased a leather dye repair kit, you can also use any application tools that came with the kit to help press down and smooth out the loose flaps of faux leather.[14]
Dry the repaired area with a hair dryer. Turn on a hair dryer to medium heat and hold it about away from the repaired area. Wiggle it back and forth over the wet dye for a few minutes until it is dry to the touch.[15]
You can also use a heat gun to dry the dye if you have one available.
If you don’t have anything to speed up the drying process, the leather dye will take 1-2 hours to dry on its own.
Touch up the repaired area with additional dye if needed. Inspect the spot you repaired after it is dry. Add more dye if you want to darken it or if there are still loose flaps of faux leather sticking up that you want to smooth out.[16]
You can repeat the process of drying the dyed area with a hair dryer and touching it up as many times as you want to until you are happy with the results.
Let the repaired faux leather dry overnight. Wait until the next day before touching the repaired area or using the item. This will give the dye plenty of time to cure and ensure that the loose pieces of faux leather are strongly adhered to the fabric underneath.[17][Edit]Sealing Tears with a Leather Repair Kit
Purchase an appropriately-colored leather or vinyl repair kit. Leather and vinyl repair kits come with colored patches, sandpaper, a cleaning solution, at least 1 patch, and adhesive. Buy one that has a patch that closely matches the color of your damaged faux leather item.[18]
These kits are commonly marketed for repairing leather and faux leather furniture and car seats. They are available online, at a home improvement center, or from a leather or auto supply shop.
You can use this type of kit to fix tears, rips, and holes in your faux leather items.
Rub the area inside the tear with the supplied sandpaper. Sand down the damaged area, being careful not to sand the intact faux leather around the tear, to remove oils and fibers. Try to get the damaged area as smooth as possible so the patch will adhere well.[19]
If your kit did not come with sandpaper, use your own fine-grit sandpaper, such as 120-grit.
Wipe the area down with a soft cloth and the supplied cleaning solution. Pour some of the kit’s cleaning solution onto a soft, clean cloth. Rub down the area inside the tear that you just sanded, as well as the surrounding faux leather, to remove any dirt and residue.[20]
If the kit did not provide you with a cleaning solution, you can use rubbing alcohol to clean the damaged area.
Cut away any flaps of faux leather around the tear using sharp scissors. Trim off any pieces of faux leather that are jagged, pointing upwards, or overhanging the tear. This will tidy up the tear so that the patch blends in better.[21]
You can use a sharp utility knife or boxcutter to do this as well.
Trim the kit’s patch to be slightly bigger than the tear. Use a pair of sharp scissors to trim a piece of the repair kits patch to the shape of the area you want to patch, making it slightly bigger. This will allow you to stick down the surrounding faux leather on top of the patch to seal the tear.[22]
Some kits might have multiple patches, in which case you can choose from different colors to get the closest possible match.
Squeeze the provided adhesive around under the edges of the tear. Carefully lift up the edges around the tear and squeeze some adhesive underneath. Use any provided tools, such as a little plastic spatula, to spread the adhesive around.[23]
Be careful not to get any adhesive onto the good faux leather around the tear. If you do, carefully scrape it off using the edge of an old card before it dries.
Press the patch down firmly inside the tear. Slip the patch into the torn area and center it so it is underneath the surrounding faux leather edges. Press and hold it in place for the recommended amount of time, according to your repair kit’s instructions.[24]
If the tear is very tiny, like a thin slit from a knife, you don’t necessarily have to use the patch. You can skip to the next step and try glueing down the surrounding faux leather to seal up the tear.
Glue the edges of the surrounding faux leather down to the patch. Apply another thin bead of the provided adhesive underneath the edges of faux leather around the patched tear. Press the edges down firmly and smoothly so that they stick around the patch.[25]
If you couldn’t find a patch in a color that closely matches your faux leather item, you can paint over it with leather paint or use leather dye to color it. Some kits might even come with different colorants you can apply on top of the patch.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
[Edit]Covering Major Peeling with Leather Paint
Leather wipes
Butter knife (optional)
Acrylic leather paint
Acrylic finisher
Paint brushes
Plastic cup
Hair dryer (optional)[Edit]Fixing Minor Peeling with Leather Dye
Leather dye
Latex gloves
Hair dryer[Edit]Sealing Tears with a Leather Repair Kit
Leather or vinyl repair kit
Soft cloth
Scissors[Edit]References↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k9j8OQELsw&feature=youtu.be&t=100

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k9j8OQELsw&feature=youtu.be&t=180

↑ https://independencebrothers.com/blogs/leather-jackets/faux-leather

↑ https://independencebrothers.com/blogs/leather-jackets/faux-leather

↑ https://independencebrothers.com/blogs/leather-jackets/faux-leather

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k9j8OQELsw&feature=youtu.be&t=300

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k9j8OQELsw&feature=youtu.be&t=450

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k9j8OQELsw&feature=youtu.be&t=520

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rw5io9gpV8&feature=youtu.be&t=78

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rw5io9gpV8&feature=youtu.be&t=82

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rw5io9gpV8&feature=youtu.be&t=127

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rw5io9gpV8&feature=youtu.be&t=135

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rw5io9gpV8&feature=youtu.be&t=169

↑ https://organizeyourstuffnow.com/repairing-leather-faux-leather-furniture

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rw5io9gpV8&feature=youtu.be&t=248

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rw5io9gpV8&feature=youtu.be&t=268

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Rw5io9gpV8&feature=youtu.be&t=268

↑ https://www.lakeland-furniture.co.uk/blog/repair-tear-faux-leather-furniture/

↑ https://www.lakeland-furniture.co.uk/blog/repair-tear-faux-leather-furniture/

↑ https://www.lakeland-furniture.co.uk/blog/repair-tear-faux-leather-furniture/

↑ https://www.lakeland-furniture.co.uk/blog/repair-tear-faux-leather-furniture/

↑ https://www.lakeland-furniture.co.uk/blog/repair-tear-faux-leather-furniture/

↑ https://organizeyourstuffnow.com/repairing-leather-faux-leather-furniture

↑ https://www.lakeland-furniture.co.uk/blog/repair-tear-faux-leather-furniture/

↑ https://www.lakeland-furniture.co.uk/blog/repair-tear-faux-leather-furniture/

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How to Camp in the Woods

Heading out to woods for a weekend can be a fun diversion from a routine weekend. A successful trip involves planning out the goods and clothing you need to carry. Carry fewer supplies if you don’t have access to a vehicle or plan on walking a lot. When you get to the woods, choose your camping spot carefully. Secure your tent and other supplies so you can have a relaxing time in nature.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Choosing a Pack and Shelter
Pack a tent that will stand up to the weather. A sturdy camping tent is the quintessential element of most camping trips. For woodland camping, you need something waterproof. Look for a tent with an attached rainfly and vents you can open to facilitate air circulation.[1]
Most tents designed for camping in the woods are 3-season tents, which means they can be used in all seasons except for winter.
If you do plan on camping in the winter, get a 4-season or winter shelter. These tents are heavier and more durable to compensate for tougher conditions.
Get a lighter tent if you plan on walking a lot. Keeping your tent lightweight is important if you need to carry it around for long distances. Smaller tents are lighter but typically house only 1 or 2 campers. Look for tents with lightweight aluminum poles. Tents with few zippers or storage spaces also save on weight.[2]
You can also lighten your load a little by leaving your tent stakes behind and securing the tent to natural features such as rocks, roots, or trees.
If you plan on car camping, which means driving to a campsite, bringing a heavy luxury tent isn’t a problem.
You may be able to go without a tent, such as if you are camping in an RV or plan on sleeping outdoors in the open air.
Get a waterproof tarp to keep your tent dry. Rain is a possibility when you’re in the woods, and a good tarp can provide some protection from it. You can often string up a tarp between the trees to drive water away from your campsite. Another option is to place a tarp underneath your tent in order to prevent moisture from leaking inside. Whatever you do, bring at least 1 tarp if you plan on camping outdoors.[3]
You can order tarps online or find them at most home improvement stores. Be sure to get rope or stakes if you plan on hanging a tarp.
Choose an insulated sleeping bag to keep yourself warm. Similar to tents, a variety of sleeping bags exist to cater to different camping experiences. A 3-season sleeping bag is suitable for most trips. Many sleeping bags are made out of synthetic materials, which makes them warm and durable. However, synthetic bags take up more space, which may be an issue as you pack.[4]
Bags filled with down feathers are warmer and can be a better option during cold nights. You can get a bag with water-resistant down, which is cheaper and not as insulating as traditional goose down.
If you camp a lot in the summer or winter, look for bags specifically for those seasons. Summer bags are lighter and more ventilated, while winter bags are heavier and more insulated.
Pick a lightweight backpack to carry your camping gear. Your choice of backpack determines how much gear you can carry. Backpacks themselves can feel quite weighty, so select yours carefully. Consider how long you plan on camping, what you need to bring, and how much you can carry.[5]
Like tents, bags have different weights. Packs with few pouches, zippers, and fabrics will be the lightest. You should test packs by wearing them to make sure they feel comfortable to you.
An overnight pack is good for a 1 or 2-day trip. Weekend packs are useful for trips 2 to 3 days long. Multiday and extended-trip packs can hold supplies for longer trips.
If you are able to make use of a vehicle, getting a great backpack is less important. Consider how far you plan on walking and what you need to carry after you park.
If you’re camping with other people, you can split up the gear between multiple bags.[Edit]Selecting Clothing
Bring at least 1 change of clothing. Spare clothing is very useful when you get caught out in the rain. It also helps when you’re sweating through warm weather. When 1 set of clothing gets wet, you can switch to your backup set while your original outfit begins to dry. Arrange your outfits before you leave and make room for them in your pack.[6]
Many people make the mistake of packing too much clothing. At a minimum, you need 2 outfits. Bring more if you would like, but make sure you can carry it.
Wear clothing made from a quick-drying fabric. Nothing is worse than wearing a cotton T-shirt and denim jeans drenched in rain and sweat. The best fabrics for camping are synthetics, such as nylon and polyester, and some natural materials, such as fleece and merino wool. These fabrics all wick away water and dry more quickly than cotton clothing. Try to choose clothing that fits you well but leaves a little space for air to circulate.[7]
Regular clothing, including jeans, shorts, and cotton shirts, are okay to bring if you have room, can keep dry, and don’t plan on walking much.
Nylon and polyester are synthetic fabrics and are a little cheaper than merino wool.
Bring a warm fleece or wool jacket for cold weather. Factor in cold weather and dipping temperatures at night. Jackets with fleece or wool linings are light, so they are easy to carry. Select a jacket that fits snugly on your body but doesn’t restrict your ability to move and breathe.[8]
Regular jackets are bulky and often dry poorly when soaked. Specialty jackets are important for camping, especially if you plan on walking a lot.
Be sure to check the weather before you leave. You may be able to risk leaving the jacket at home.
Include a rain jacket to stay dry in bad weather. Look for jackets that are both waterproof and breathable. These jackets feel lighter and less oppressive than regular rain jackets. Water-resistant gear is available, but it is only meant to shield you from light rains over a short amount of time.[9]
Some items, including ponchos, are okay to use in a stationary camp. These options are cheaper but can easily break.
Consider investing in waterproof clothing if you plan on being around water a lot, such as while on a boat.
Wear a bandana, wide hat, or other sun protection. Take into account how long you will be exposed to the sun so you don’t get any nasty burns. Cover your head with a bandana or wear a wide-brimmed hat to protect the top of your head. You will likely want sunglasses as well to shield your eyes.[10]
You definitely need these items while you are out in the daytime. They are important even when the skies are overcast.
Select a pair of hiking boots that support your ankles. Hiking boots may not seem important for camping in the woods, but a good pair of shoes can protect you from ankle injuries. Hiking shoes, which look similar to regular tennis shoes, are great options for day trips. Choose a pair that feel snug but give your toes a little room to move around.[11]
Hiking shoes or boots are a must if you plan on walking around, especially if you’re around rocks or slippery areas. They hold up better to the moisture and give more traction on difficult walking surfaces than regular shoes.
Day hiking boots are a sturdier footwear option that’s useful for short hikes and carrying light loads. Backpacking boots give you extra support when you are on long trips and carrying heavier loads.[Edit]Packing Supplies
Bring a portable stove to cook your food. You can purchase a portable burner to cook up food on the go. Some stoves run on propane, but others use wood or charcoal, so bring some fuel as well. Take matches as well in case you need them to activate the stove.[12]
You can also cook over a campfire. Try bringing along a cooking grate and lay it over your fire pit.
Bring a pot, knife, and other utensils. If you pack lightly, you don’t need to take a lot of these supplies. Most portable ovens are small, so you end up cooking everything in a single pot. You will need a sharp knife in order to cut food, open cans, and perform other handy tasks around camp. Bring a few forks and spoons to help you cook and eat.[13]
Plastic utensils and paper plates are acceptable if you’re not isolated in the woods. For backpacking trips, these items are an issue since they aren’t reusable and you may not find a place to throw them away.
Choose prepared foods you can eat on the go. Peanut butter, granola bars, nuts, jerky, and dried fruits all require little to no preparation. When you don’t have time to cook or are unable to because of a storm, you will have these snacks to tide you over. These foods don’t take up much space and won’t expire during your trip.[14]
If you have access to a vehicle, you can still bring a cooler with meat, beverages, and other goodies.
Bring along canteens filled with water. Take reusable canteens that you can keep filled at all times. Plastic water bottles are fine, but keep in mind that they can be heavy and you may not be able to dispose of used bottles right away. If you’re on the go, a gravity filter will allow you to purify water wherever you camp.[15]
If you’re going to an established campground, find out where the water taps are so you can access them at all times.
If you think you may not have access to clean water, bring water purification tablets so you can sterilize water from a natural source.[16]
Keep a first-aid kit ready in case of emergencies. Pack your first-aid kit with a list of emergency phone numbers and any medications you need. Bandages, a needle, scissors, and antiseptic wipes are a few useful supplies to include in the kit. You may wish to include duct tape, which can be used in a multitude of ways around camp.[17]
For instance, you can set a broken bone by making a splint out of clothing, branches, and duct tape.
Also, consider bringing a satellite phone so you can always call for help during an emergency.
Bring along some entertainment to keep you busy. Keeping yourself entertained is up to you, but a pack of cards can go a long way. Electronics usually aren’t an option out in the woods, so use your time to relax. Read books, tell stories, or observe wildlife.[18]
Consider what your needs are. If you plan on walking a lot, you might not be able to bring along a lot of games or activities.
If fishing is legal near your campground, you might bring along fishing supplies, for example.
Use insect repellent and sunscreen to protect yourself. Bugs and bright sunlight are common in the woods, so don’t let them ruin your trip. Make use of these products at least once a day to protect your skin. Increase their effectiveness by wearing covering clothing and taking shelter in your tent.[19]
Choose a broad spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 30. Try to reapply the sunscreen at least every 2 hours, or more often if you’re getting wet or sweaty.[20]
Spray an insect repellent containing DEET or picaridin on your clothing and exposed skin to protect you from mosquitoes, ticks, and other biting pests.[21][Edit]Setting up and Maintaining Camp
Choose a spot away from hills. When camping, the best spots are ones where you won’t wake up in a puddle of rainwater. Look for flat pieces of ground that are above nearby slopes. If you camp near a slope, water may run down it and gather underneath your tent. If possible, look for marked spots or clearings where other people have camped before.[22]
While you can dig out the soil to guide water away from you, this is frowned upon in many camping areas. Avoid the trouble by choosing your spot carefully.
Pitch your tent on level ground. Whether you camp in a tent or an RV, the ground needs to be as flat as possible. Most commercial sites are situated on ideal spots, but if you’re out in the wilderness on your own, search around for a decent spot. Level ground feels more comfortable to lie on and you can rest easy knowing water won’t rush towards your tent.[23]
Stake your tent carefully. Plant the stakes firmly in the ground and tether your tent to them with strong rope.
Position a waterproof tarp underneath your tent. Your tent should rest completely on the tarp in order to seal out water. Fold the tarp so that it doesn’t protrude out from under the tent. If it sticks out at all, water can get on top of it and leak into your tent.[24]
Another way to lay down a tarp is to put it inside the tent. Tuck the edges up over the tent’s frame so water can’t get on top of the tarp.
Build a fire pit to start a fire. Clear the wood and other debris from an area about away from your tent. Dig a hole in the ground about the size of the fire you desire, then surround it with rocks. Stack smaller branches over bigger ones in the hole, then light the bigger branches to start your fire![25]
To put out the fire, smother it with dirt or water. You can push the tinder around with a large stick to make sure it is out. You shouldn’t feel any heat coming off the tinder when you move your hands towards it.
A good campfire is useful for cold nights or cooking out in the open, but it isn’t always necessary. If you have a portable stove in the middle of summer, you may wish to skip building a separate fire pit.
Be cautious when starting fires. Always keep an eye on the fire and put it out before you return to your tent or leave the area.
Drink plenty of water while you camp. Many woodland campgrounds have taps you can access to keep yourself hydrated. If a tap isn’t available, pop open bottles of water or purify your own water by setting up a gravity filter. Dehydration is a risk, especially during hikes, so keep your canteens filled.[26]
Symptoms of dehydration include headaches, dry mouth, dizziness, and fatigue. If you are dehydrated, drink water as soon as possible and consider going to a doctor immediately.
Boiling water does help, but it may not purify it enough to make it completely safe to drink. For the best results, bring a portable filter.
Move food waste away from your campground. Hungry animals may show up when you least expect them. Always clean your campground after you eat, disposing of or storing your waste. Keep all of your cooking supplies at the edge of your area, far from your tent. Lock food away in a bear-proof cooler to discourage theft.[27]
Avoid cooking fragrant foods like bacon or fish, if possible, since these are most likely to attract wild animals.
One way to protect your food is to suspend a bear-proof cooler from a dark rope tied to a tree branch. Animals may give up quickly if they can’t reach the food.
Scare away bears and other wild animals if they find your camp. Wild animals can be a problem in the woods, especially bears and wolves. Encountering these creatures may be a scary thought, but they are mostly harmless. If you see them, do not approach them. Stay back and make loud noises, such as by talking, yelling, and banging items together, to scare the animal off.[28]
Bear attacks are relatively rare, but you should still know how to deal with them. If a bear growls or looks defensive, stand still. If it charges, lie down and play dead.
Clean up your camping area before you leave. Leave your campsite as you found it! Make sure your campfire is out first. Then, collect all of your gear and waste. Avoid leaving trash like food tins or plastic bottles lying around. Keep the land pristine so the next camper can enjoy it too.[29]
Sometimes you may have to bite the bullet and carry trash with you until you find a place to throw it away.
Clear out your fire pit if you dug one and fill it with dirt again. Avoid burying trash in it.[Edit]Video
[Edit]Tips
Research your campground so you know what to expect. Find out where you can set up your tent, what amenities are nearby, and what animals are in the area.
Camp with other people! You can trade stories and keep each other entertained.
Be respectful of other campers. Many people go camping to get away. They may not appreciate loud music or other distractions.
Camping with a vehicle is a lot different than backpacking. You have a lot more storage space and can carry heavier supplies.
Remember the golden rule, which is “Leave the campground the way you found it.” Pick up after yourself![Edit]Warnings
Fire is dangerous! Never leave a fire burning unattended and keep smoke out of your tent.
Wild animals are an unavoidable part of camping. Prepare for this and seal away food to discourage animals from entering your camp.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Tent
Sleeping bag
Backpack
A change of clothing
Waterproof rain jacket
Sunglasses
Camp stove
Pot
Utensils
Fuel
Water bottles
Food
First aid kit
Rope[Edit]Related wikiHows
Camp in the Rain
Set up a Camping Area
Survive in the Woods
Clean Dishes on a Camping Trip
Pack for a Camping Trip[Edit]References↑ https://gearjunkie.com/how-to-choose-a-tent

↑ https://gearjunkie.com/how-to-choose-a-tent

↑ https://www.montgomeryparks.org/uploads/docs/Essentialcampinggearchecklist_000.pdf

↑ https://www.colorado.com/articles/camping-colorado-basics

↑ https://greatist.com/fitness/know-you-go-camping

↑ https://darlingmagazine.org/how-to-dress-for-a-camping-trip/

↑ https://www.wilderness.org/articles/article/45-tips-foolproof-fall-camping

↑ https://www.nationalforests.org/blog/16-camping-dos-and-donts

↑ https://backpackers.com/outdoor-guides/rain-jacket-guide/

↑ https://www.montgomeryparks.org/uploads/docs/Essentialcampinggearchecklist_000.pdf

↑ https://www.backpacker.com/gear/gear-choosing-the-right-pair-of-hiking-boots

↑ https://www.colorado.com/articles/camping-colorado-basics

↑ https://greatist.com/fitness/know-you-go-camping

↑ https://spoonuniversity.com/lifestyle/10-best-foods-to-bring-camping

↑ https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nation/what-to-bring-camping-gear-tips

↑ https://www.wilderness.org/articles/article/45-tips-foolproof-fall-camping

↑ https://www.colorado.com/articles/camping-colorado-basics

↑ https://www.montgomeryparks.org/uploads/docs/Essentialcampinggearchecklist_000.pdf

↑ https://www.montgomeryparks.org/uploads/docs/Essentialcampinggearchecklist_000.pdf

↑ https://www.cancer.org/latest-news/choose-the-right-sunscreen.html

↑ https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2018/the-pre-travel-consultation/protection-against-mosquitoes-ticks-other-arthropods

↑ https://www.outdoorlife.com/7-rules-for-building-best-backcountry-camp#page-2

↑ https://www.outdoorlife.com/7-rules-for-building-best-backcountry-camp#page-2

↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjqqxoP8KQI

↑ https://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/41282.html

↑ https://greatist.com/fitness/know-you-go-camping

↑ https://www.outdoorlife.com/7-rules-for-building-best-backcountry-camp#page-7

↑ https://www.grizzlydiscoveryctr.org/education/bear-awareness-hiking-camping/

↑ https://www.nationalforests.org/blog/16-camping-dos-and-donts

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Today in History for 29th April 2020

Historical Events

1553 – Flemish woman introduces practice of starching linen into England
1903 – Limestone slides at Turtle Mountain kill 9 in Frank, Alberta
1932 – 1st broadcast of “One Man’s Family” on NBC radio, longest-running dramatic serial on US radio (ends 1959)
1982 – Alfredo Magana elected President of El Salvador
1986 – NFL Draft: Auburn running back Bo Jackson first pick by Tampa Bay Buccaneers
1992 – 27th Academy of Country Music Awards: Garth Brooks and Reba McEntire win

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Famous Birthdays

1896 – Jacques Wolfe, Romanian-American composer, born in Botoşani, Romania (d. 1973)
1925 – Albert “Ab” Abspoel, Dutch actor and director (Surprise Attack, Elevator), born in The Hague, Zuid-Holland, Netherlands (d. 2000)
1945 – Hugh Hopper, rocker (Soft Machine)
1963 – Mike Babcock, Canadian NHL Coach (Anaheim, Detroit, Team Canada), born in Manitouwadge, Ontario
1974 – Alana Blahoski, ice hockey forward (USA, Olympics 1998)
1974 – Julian Knowle, Austrian tennis player

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Famous Deaths

1935 – Leroy Carr, American blues singer-songwriter, dies at 30
1956 – Nemesio Otano y Eugenio, composer, dies at 75
1986 – Seamus McElwaine, Irish IRA-terrorist, killed at 25
1988 – Jan Kapr, Czech composer, dies at 74
2012 – Amarillo Slim, American professional poker player, dies at 83
2015 – Jean Nidetch, American businesswoman and founder of Weight Watchers, dies at 91

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