How to Make a Homeschool Classroom

Creating a classroom area for your child’s homeschool may help your child transition to a school mindset each day. Start by designating a space and decorating the room, then set up the basic furniture for your learning area. Finally, work on organizing your supplies so you’re ready to go.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Preparing Your Homeschool Room
Set aside a whole room if you have space. If possible, it can be helpful to dedicate a whole room to homeschooling, as it keeps the mess out of sight and helps keep your kids on task. You can use a family room, den, basement, office, or even an extra bedroom. You may even be able to convert a shed with electricity into a homeschooling room.[1]
Add your classroom to an existing room if you don’t have extra space. It’s entirely possible you don’t have the space to devote a whole room to homeschooling. If that’s the case, try picking a central area, such as the living room or dining area. Choose an area where you can add some storage, so that you can hide school stuff away when your kids aren’t working on it.[2]
Your dining area is a good choice since you already have a table in place for your kids to use.
Even if your kids tend to spread out around the house to work, you should still have a designated area for keeping your school supplies.[3]
Choose an area without distractions. Pick an area that doesn’t have distractions like a television, video game console, or the like. You want your kids to stay on task as much as possible, and distractions won’t help with that!
Try to pick a quiet area in the house that doesn’t have a lot of extraneous noise. For instance, you may not want to put the room too close to the laundry room.
Similarly, while you wouldn’t want to cover up the windows, you may want to face the classroom away from the windows.
Let any other household members know school is in session by hanging a sign on the door. That way, they won’t barge in!
Pick a room without carpet or install floor mats. Homeschooling can get messy, especially if you’re crafting or cutting up paper at all. By choosing a room without carpet, you can sweep up most debris, and if something like paint spills, it’s much easier to clean up.[4]
If the room you want to use has carpet, consider pulling it up. You may find hardwood or tile underneath. If it’s concrete, you can even just paint the concrete. If you find subfloor, you can put in laminate or another cheap and durable flooring solution.
Alternatively, try adding plastic office floor mats. These have spikes that go into carpet to hold them in place and provide a hard plastic surface on top.
Paint one or more walls with bright, happy colors if you can. You and your kids are going to spend a lot of time in your homeschooling room, so you might as well make it cheerful. If you’re allowed to paint the walls in your home, try choosing a bright accent color for one or two walls, then paint the other walls a more neutral color.[5]
You could pick a creamy yellow for sunshine effect or a bright purple if it’s your kids’ favorite color.
Add fun decals to the walls if you don’t want to paint. Stick up wall decals of animals, flowers, the alphabet, or any fun theme your kids will like. Wall decals make it easy to change out the theme, as you can just peel them off and stick up a new set when you’re tired of the old ones.[6]
You can find wall decals at craft stores or online.
If you want something a little more permanent, try stenciling the alphabet and numbers on the walls, or having your kids paint a mural together.[Edit]Setting up a Learning Space
Include a table or desks to work on. While some kids may need to move to other areas at times, having a designated area to work on can help keep everyone on track. It can be the kitchen table, small desks for each kid, or even just a large, sturdy folding table.[7]
Add a whiteboard or projector screen to teach from. If you’re teaching several kids at once, you may want to use a board they can all see. You can get standalone whiteboards to set at one end of your classroom. You can also fold these whiteboards and put them away when you don’t need them. Alternatively, you can mount one on the wall to save space and use it as a projector screen as well.[8]
A computer with a large screen or TV screen hooked up to it will also work for displaying images and slideshows.
You can even just paint one wall with white paint, and project images and slideshows onto the wall using a computer and projector.
Include a space to read. Nothing is quite as nice as curling up in a comfy corner with a book. You could throw a large beanbag or floor pillow in a corner with a lamp or set up a comfy loveseat with a lamp. That way, when your kids need to spend some time reading, they have a designated place to go.[9]
You don’t have to include this space in your homeschooling area, as you likely have other spaces in your house. However, it can make it more fun to have a dedicated area for it.
Gather the school supplies you’ll need. For younger kids, you’ll need crayons, pencils, chalk, and art supplies. For older kids, you’ll need pens, pencils, whiteout, and maybe cheap tablets to work on. You may also need some subject-specific supplies, such as a calculator for math, lab supplies for science, and highlighters for English and social studies.[10]
For both ages, you’ll also need things like staples and a stapler, a 3-ring hole punch, paper clips, a printer, and highlighters.
Print out classroom rules and charts. Kids need help staying on track, so having the classroom rules up on the wall in a pretty font can help. You may also want to have a schedule on the wall if you plan out your day with specific time frames.[11]
Try a chart for each kid, letting them know what they need to complete each day. You can have them fill in sections with stickers as they get done.
You could also dedicate a whiteboard to daily tasks. That is, you can have a section on the whiteboard for what each kid needs to accomplish that day.
Add a cork board or a metal board to display your children’s work. If your child does well, you may want to stick it up on the wall. A cork board is an easy way to do this, as you can just use pushpins to pin up their work.
Alternatively, set up a board that will hold magnets. For instance, some whiteboards are metal underneath.[Edit]Organizing the Supplies
Designate a bookshelf, shelving unit, or cabinet to organizing. When you homeschool, you need a ton of supplies, from pens, pencils, and papers to textbooks, curriculum, and worksheets. A designated shelving unit can help you organize the chaos.[12]
If you don’t have much cash, try scouring garage sales and thrift stores.
Alternatively, start with a few plastic bins until you can upgrade to a shelf.
Try painting what you find so it blends in with the space you put it in.[13]
Pick storage that hides supplies away. Whether you choose large plastic bins, a large cabinet, or storage cubes on shelves, find a way to hide your supplies away. Organize your items into bins before placing them on the shelves. Hiding your messy supplies will make everything feel so much neater.[14]
If you don’t have storage bins, try painting old shoe boxes or used postal boxes. They can look bright and cheery once you paint them, and you can store items in them.
You can also use things like cups to organize pens and pencils. While it won’t hide them, it will keep them more organized.
When you don’t have to look at the chaos of school supplies all the time, you’ll feel more calm and collected, and your kids will, too.
Make a specific place for each school supply to live. Books, pencils, crayons, paper–each of these needs a specific place to call home. If you don’t set aside a single space for each thing, your school supplies will end up in a jumbled mess because no one will know where to put anything![15]
Label where each item should go with masking tape or a label maker. Have everyone put things away in their place at the end of the day.
Pick an organizational method for papers. You can use 2-pocket folders, expanding folders, binders, or even files to organize papers for you and your kids. Try color-coding them, so each of your kids has one color and you have your own color. That way, you can easily keep track of what folder belongs to each person.[16]
Make sure to label everything clearly, so it’s easy to keep track of.
Get rid of what you don’t need each year. You’re likely going to be adding new supplies each year, which can quickly overrun your organizational space. To cut back on the problem, take stock of your supplies each year, and donate or sell anything you don’t need anymore. That way, you free up space for new stuff.[17]
[Edit]References↑ https://www.thechaosandtheclutter.com/archives/our-homeschool-classroom

↑ https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/organized-homeschool-space-dining-room/

↑ https://raisinglifelonglearners.com/organizing-your-homeschool-in-a-tiny-house/

↑ https://www.thechaosandtheclutter.com/archives/our-homeschool-classroom

↑ https://www.thechaosandtheclutter.com/archives/our-homeschool-classroom

↑ https://www.thechaosandtheclutter.com/archives/our-homeschool-classroom

↑ https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/organized-homeschool-space-dining-room/

↑ https://www.thechaosandtheclutter.com/archives/our-homeschool-classroom

↑ https://www.thechaosandtheclutter.com/archives/our-homeschool-classroom

↑ https://thepioneerwoman.com/homeschooling/5-tips-for-organizing-your-homeschool-room/

↑ https://thepioneerwoman.com/homeschooling/5-tips-for-organizing-your-homeschool-room/

↑ http://boldturquoise.com/homeschooling-without-a-school-room-staying-classy/

↑ https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/organized-homeschool-space-dining-room/

↑ https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/organized-homeschool-space-dining-room/

↑ https://thepioneerwoman.com/homeschooling/5-tips-for-organizing-your-homeschool-room/

↑ https://thepioneerwoman.com/homeschooling/5-tips-for-organizing-your-homeschool-room/

↑ https://www.thispilgrimlife.com/organized-homeschool-space-dining-room/

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Today in History for 7th April 2020

Historical Events

1625 – Albrecht von Wallenstein appointed German supreme commander
1923 – Workers Party of America (NYC) becomes official communist party
1944 – World War II: General Montgomery speaks to generals at St. Paul’s School about his vision for the upcoming D-Day landings
1965 – Bevan Congdon makes a stumping as 12th man NZ v Pakistan
1980 – Jimmy Carter breaks relations with Iran during hostage crisis
1987 – Al Campanis, Dodger executive for more than 40 years, resigns, after making racial remarks on “Nightline”

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1897 – Walter Winchell, Harlem newscaster/columnist (Untouchables), born in NYC, New York
1926 – Johannes Rood, Dutch immunologist (Eurotransplant)
1939 – Gary Kellgren, American music producer who cofounded The Record Plant studios, born in Shenandoah, Iowa (d. 1977)
1956 – Christopher Darden, American O.J. Simpson prosecutor
1963 – Jaime de Marichalar, duke of Lugo, Spanish royalty
1972 – Shana Williams, Bridgeton NJ, long jumper/heptathlete

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1789 – Peter Camper, anatomist/animal scholar, dies at 66
1789 – Abd-ul-Hamid I, Ottoman Sultan (b. 1725)
1877 – Errico Petrella, Italian composer, dies at 63
1880 – Isaac M. St. John, American Brigadier General (Confederate Army), dies at 52
1987 – Maxine Sullivan [Marietta Williams], American jazz vocalist and performer (Going Places), dies following a seizure at 75
1996 – John Evan “Jasper” Weston-Davies [pen name Berkley Mather], English writer, dies at 87

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How to Use a Peloton Bike

The Peloton indoor cycling bike features a built-in wireless touchscreen that allows you to stream live or on-demand classes to get a great workout at home. Your Peloton bike must be delivered and installed by professionals so it can be calibrated and connected. But, once you’re set-up, using your bike is easy and fun! Adjust the bike so it’s comfortable for you and choose your first ride from the touchscreen menu. Eventually, you’ll become fluent in the lingo and you may even want to join a tribe of riders that share some of your interests.

[Edit]Steps
[Edit]Setting the Seat Position
Turn the lever below the seat to the left to loosen it. Find the lever that adjusts the height of the seat located on the frame of the bike below the seat. Rotate it to the left, or counterclockwise, to loosen it. Turn it so the seat is loose enough to be moved up and down.[1]
Allow the lever to keep a little bit of tension on the seat so it doesn’t slide all the way down as you adjust it.
Stand next to the bike and move the seat so it’s aligned with your hip. Once the seat is loose enough to move, use your hands to raise it up or down. Move the seat so it’s in line with the bone of your hip so it’s adjusted to the proper height.[2]
Aligning the seat with your hip bone is recommended for first time users, but eventually, you may find that a different seat position is more comfortable for you. For example, if you have really long legs, raising the seat a little higher than hip-height can reduce tension on your knees.
Tighten the seat by turning the lever to the right. Lock the seat into position by rotating the lever on the frame clockwise, or to the right. Continue turning the lever until the seat is held firmly and securely.[3]
Loosen the lever underneath the seat by turning it to the left. Find the lever that adjusts the depth of your seat, which is located on the underside of it. Rotate it counterclockwise to loosen it so you can easily move the seat forward or backward with your hands.[4]
Use the length of your arm to adjust the seat to the proper depth. Stand next to your bike and rest your elbow on the nose, or the very front of the seat. Then, keeping your elbow on the seat, try to touch the handlebars with your fingertips. Move the seat so that your fingertips just touch the handlebars.[5]
Using your elbow and fingertips is an easy way for beginners to find a proper seat depth, but you may find that a different position is more comfortable for you.
Rotate the lever to the right to tighten the seat. Use 1 hand to hold the seat in position and turn the lever to the right to tighten it. Continue rotating the lever as far as you can so the seat is held firmly and securely in position.[6][Edit]Adjusting the Handlebar Height
Loosen the lever on the front of the bike by turning it to the left. Find the lever that controls the height of the handlebars located on the very front of the bike. Turn the lever counterclockwise to loosen the handlebars so they can be moved up and down.[7]
Stand in front of the seat and place your forearms under the handlebars. Stand with the frame of the bike between your legs and the handlebars in front of you. Cradle the handlebars with your forearms and bend your knees slightly.[8]
Don’t try to raise the handlebars from the front or side of the bike or you could strain your back.
Lift the handlebars and hold them in place. Press up through your forearms to raise the handlebars. When you’ve reached your desired height, hold them in place with 1 of your arms cradled beneath them.[9]
Tighten the lever by turning it to the right to secure the handlebars. With 1 arm cradling the handlebars to keep them held in position, use your other hand to rotate the adjustment lever to the right to tighten it. Continue turning the lever as far as you can so the handlebars are held in position.[10][Edit]Clipping in and out of the Bike
Stand with 1 foot on each side of the bike frame and the pedals lying flat. Stand over the center of the bike frame with the pedals between your legs. Move the pedals so they’re aligned horizontally with the ground and the Peloton logo is facing up.[11]
The Peloton logo must be facing up in order for you to fit your shoes into the grooves on the pedals.
Insert the cleat of 1 shoe into the grooves of a pedal with your toes pointing down. Peloton bikes use “clipless” pedals, so you’ll need to wear cycling shoes with a 3-bolt cleat that fit into them. Align the cleat on the bottom of 1 of your shoes with the grooves on the top of 1 of the pedals. Point your toes down as you slide 1 of your shoes into the grooves and begin to push forward on the pedal.[12]
You don’t have to use the Peloton brand shoes to clip into the bike. Any cycling shoe that has a 3-bolt cleat mount will work just fine!
Keep your other foot firmly planted on the ground to provide balance.
Push down on the pedal until you hear it click into place. Drive through the heel of your foot as you rotate the pedals. Continue pushing until you hear a “click” and your shoe snaps into place on the pedal.[13]
Slide your other foot into the other pedal and press forward. Move the pedals so they’re lying flat and insert the cleat of your other shoe into the grooves on the top of the other pedal. Point your toes down and drive through your heel as you rotate the pedals until you hear it snap into place.[14]
Kick your heel outward and your toes inward to clip out of the bike. Whenever you’re ready to clip out of the bike, bring the pedals to a complete stop. Then, use 1 swift motion to kick your heel outward and drive your toes toward the frame of the bike. The locking mechanism will disengage and you can remove your foot from the pedal. Repeat the motion on the other side to remove your other shoe.[15]
Never try to clip out while the pedals are still spinning or you could seriously injure yourself.[Edit]Riding the Peloton Bike
Turn on your Peloton bike and enter your subscription information to activate it. Press the power button on the touchscreen to turn on the bike and bring up the main menu. Follow the onscreen prompts to enter information such as your time zone and the email you used to pay for your subscription. Choose the subscription for the account and tap the button that says “Activate.”[16]
If you received your Peloton bike as a gift, enter the subscription activation key instead of your email.
Add any additional riders that may use the bike as well.
Create a leaderboard name that represents you. When you login to your Peloton bike’s home screen for the first time, you’ll be prompted to create a screen name that will appear on the leaderboard and the class roster. Choose one that tells a little bit about yourself and is relatively simple and easy to read so your instructor can give you a shout out during a live class.[17]
For example, if you’re a stay-at-home mom, and you’re looking to be more active, you could choose a screen name like, “FitMomEmma.” Or, if you’re an early riser, you could choose something like, “ZeroDarkThirtyRider.”
Avoid vulgar or complicated leaderboard names like, “xX_JR1996M_xX_” which can be difficult to read.
Your leaderboard name can give a sense of who you are, which will help you find riders with similar personalities and interests.
Check out the Peloton 101 tutorial if you’re brand new to the bike. Once you’re logged into the home screen, look for the video series labeled “Peloton 101” in the list of menu options. If you’re just getting started riding your Peloton bike, spend some time going through the videos so you can get even more familiar with your bike.[18]
You don’t have to watch all of the tutorial at once if you’re ready to get to a ride. You can always check it out later.
Choose an on-demand ride to ride whenever you want. Once you’re logged in, look through the onscreen menu for lists of rides that you can choose. If you can’t make the time that a live class is set to start, or you just want to choose your own ride on your own time, select the on-demand menu. Scroll through the options and read the descriptions find one that sounds appealing to you.[19]
You can still save your stats and details during on-demand rides so you can revisit them later and add to your overall riding scores.
Look at the type of ride to find one that’s right for you. For example, choose a “Beginner” ride if you’re new to the bike, or choose a “Heart Rate Zone” ride for a cardio-focused ride.
Join a live ride if you want to participate in real-time. Check the times on the home screen for upcoming live rides and join the lobby about 10 minutes before the ride is set to start so you can participate in the warmup and class discussion. You’ll be able to actively participate in real-time and ask questions or receive feedback from the instructor.[20]
You’ll get a shoutout from the instructor for your first live ride!
Select an encore ride to have your results on a live leaderboard. If you can’t make it for a live ride, you can choose one from the encore menu to participate in a pre-recorded ride with an active leaderboard. You’ll have real-time riders participating with you, and you’ll be able to save your stats for the ride to contribute to your total riding scores.[21]
An encore ride is a great option if you have certain instructors that you prefer, but you can’t always make their live rides.
Follow the directions of your instructor during your ride. Whenever a ride starts, follow the commands of the instructor so you can get the most out of your ride while also ensuring that you do it safely. When your instructor says to speed up, speed up! When they tell you to slow down, slow down. Each ride has an intentional structure and pace for you to follow.[22]
Increase the resistance by turning the resistance knob clockwise. During the ride, your instructor will tell you to either increase or decrease the resistance. To do this, locate the resistance knob on the frame of the below the handlebars. Turn it to the right to increase the resistance and to the left to decrease the resistance.[23]
As you get more experienced, you’ll become better at finding the right amount of resistance for you.
Press the resistance knob straight down to apply the brakes. If you need to slow down your bike or bring it to a quick stop, you can apply the brakes by pressing the resistance knob straight down. Continue holding the knob down until the pedals have slowed enough to allow you to bring them to a stop on your own.[24][Edit]Learning the Lingo
Use the Peloton picks program to try different coaching styles. Every Peloton coach will have their own way of motivating you and have a vocabulary that is slightly different than other instructors. Explore the Peloton picks option on the home screen to try out rides with different instructors so you can find one that you enjoy. As you ride with them more often, you’ll pick up on their unique cues and lingo.[25]
You’ll also see when each instructor has scheduled live rides so you can work to incorporate them into your schedule.
Place your hands at the widest part of the handlebars for 1st position. Take a comfortable seated position on the seat of the bike, also known as the saddle. Lean forward with your back flat and straight, your shoulders relaxed, and your chest open to allow your lungs to expand. Place your hands at the widest part of the handlebars.[26]
Whenever an instructor tells you to go back to 1st position in a ride, gently return to this position.
If you have to reach for the handlebars, try adjusting your seat so it’s closer and more comfortable for you.
Rise out of the seat and continue to pedal to be in 2nd position. Turn the resistance knob clockwise so it takes more effort to pedal. Stand up out of the seat with your head up and chest open as you continue to pedal. Position your hips so they’re directly over the pedals and place your hands on the bend of the handlebars to support your upper body.[27]
2nd position is often used for low-speed, high resistance standing jogs.
Stand with your hips in front of the pedals to use 3rd position. Increase the resistance by turning the knob so you can stand out of the seat. Rise up out of the seat with your head high and your chest open and position your hips in front of the pedals as you continue to turn them. Place your hands at the top of the handlebars for stability.[28]
This position is often used for steep climbs or to accelerate to high speeds.
Calculate your Power Zone so you can push yourself on rides. Select an “FTP” test ride from the library on your monitor and complete it to find your specific zones so you can use them to go on Power Zone rides. Knowing your specific zones will help you understand how hard you need to push yourself in order to stay in the zone and get the most out of your rides.[29]
Focusing on Power Zone rides will also allow you to track your progress as you get better and better.
Look for the instructors Denis Morton and Matt Wilpers in the library to find FTP test rides you can use to find your zones.
Give high-fives to other riders by tapping their profile picture. During a live or encore ride, you can congratulate another rider or simply say hello by sending them a “high-five.” Locate the profile picture of the person you want to high-five next to their leaderboard name on your home screen. Double-tap the picture with your finger to send them a high-five.[30]
The other rider will be notified that you send them a high-five and they may send one in return.
If someone breaks their own record or if you both just survived a tough steep climb, a high-five is a great way to motivate each other!
Earn a Century Shirt by completing 100 rides. Once you finish your 100th ride, you’re eligible for a Peloton Century Shirt that you can wear to show off your accomplishment. Look for an email within a week or so after you finish your 100th ride, or reach out to the Peloton support team to ask about it if you don’t receive an email. The shirt itself is free, but you’ll need to pay a shipping fee to have it sent to you.[31]
Shipping usually costs about $7 or so.
If you try to buy a Century Shirt before you earn it, it will cost $100,000!
Join a tribe that appeals to you to find a community of riders. On the leaderboard during rides, you’ll see various groups of riders labeled with a hashtag, such as #PelotonMoms or #PowerZonePack. These are “tribes” or groups of riders who have similar interests that participate in rides together. Join a tribe that shares similar interests so you can ride with them and keep yourself motivated.[32]
For example, there are tribes of doctors, lawyers, teachers, early morning risers, and many more that you can choose to join.
Many tribes also have Facebook groups that you can join so you can communicate with them outside of the Peloton rides.[Edit]Things You’ll Need
Peloton bike
Cycling shoes with a 3-bolt cleat
Sweat towel
Water bottle[Edit]References↑ https://youtu.be/vDInG0S13tM?t=53

↑ https://youtu.be/vDInG0S13tM?t=62

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↑ https://medium.com/@JohnA/the-absolute-beginners-guide-to-peloton-eb0a42933ce3

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↑ https://www.businessinsider.com/are-peloton-bikes-worth-the-cost-2019-3

↑ https://youtu.be/3Be3K7g9y7k?t=49

↑ https://medium.com/@JohnA/the-absolute-beginners-guide-to-peloton-eb0a42933ce3

↑ https://youtu.be/erqLKwwZCVE?t=166

↑ https://blog.onepeloton.com/ultimate-guide-peloton-ride-types/

↑ https://youtu.be/vDInG0S13tM?t=352

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↑ https://medium.com/@JohnA/the-absolute-beginners-guide-to-peloton-eb0a42933ce3

↑ https://blog.onepeloton.com/new-features-more-ways-to-ride-together/

↑ https://medium.com/@JohnA/the-absolute-beginners-guide-to-peloton-eb0a42933ce3

↑ https://medium.com/@JohnA/the-absolute-beginners-guide-to-peloton-eb0a42933ce3

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