Australian English

Australian English
RegionAustralia
Native speakers
18.5 million in Australia (2021)[1]
5 million L2 speakers of English in Australia (approx 2021)
Early forms
Latin (English alphabet)
Unified English Braille[2]
Language codes
ISO 639-3
Glottologaust1314
IETFen-AU[3][4]
This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode characters. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA.
Percentage of people who speak the English language at home in 2016

Australian English (AusE, AusEng, AuE, AuEng, en-AU) is the set of varieties of the English language native to Australia. It is the country's common language and de facto national language; while Australia has no official language, English is the first language of the majority of the population, and has been entrenched as the de facto national language since European settlement, being the only language spoken in the home for about 72.7% of Australians.[5] [6] It is also the main language used in compulsory education, as well as federal, state and territorial legislatures and courts.

Australian English began to diverge from British and Irish English after the First Fleet established the Colony of New South Wales in 1788. Australian English arose from a dialectal 'melting pot' created by the intermingling of early settlers who were from a variety of dialectal regions of Great Britain and Ireland,[7] though its most significant influences were the dialects of Southeast England.[8] By the 1820s, the native-born colonists' speech was recognisably distinct from speakers in Britain and Ireland.[9]

Australian English differs from other varieties in its phonology, pronunciation, lexicon, idiom, grammar and spelling.[10] Australian English is relatively consistent across the continent, although it encompasses numerous regional and sociocultural varieties. 'General Australian' describes the de-facto standard dialect, which is perceived to be free of pronounced regional or sociocultural markers and that is often used in the media.

  1. ^ English (Australia) at Ethnologue (19th ed., 2016)
  2. ^ "Unified English Braille". Australian Braille Authority. 18 May 2016. Retrieved 2 January 2017.
  3. ^ "English"; IANA language subtag registry; subject named as: en; publication date: 16 October 2005; retrieved: 11 January 2019.
  4. ^ "Australia"; IANA language subtag registry; subject named as: AU; publication date: 16 October 2005; retrieved: 11 January 2019.
  5. ^ "2071.0 – Census of Population and Housing: Reflecting Australia – Stories from the Census, 2016". Abs.gov.au. Archived from the original on 2 September 2017. Retrieved 27 September 2017.
  6. ^ "Pluralist Nations: Pluralist Language Policies?". 1995 Global Cultural Diversity Conference Proceedings, Sydney. Department of Social Services. Archived from the original on 20 December 2008. Retrieved 10 July 2017. "English has no de jure status but it is so entrenched as the common language that it is de facto the official language as well as the national language."
  7. ^ Burridge, Kate (2020). "Chapter 11: History of Australian English". In Willoughby, Louisa (ed.). Australian English Reimagined: Structure, Features and Developments. Routledge. pp. 178¬–181. ISBN 978-0-367-02939-5.
  8. ^ Cite error: The named reference Moore 2008 69 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  9. ^ Burridge, Kate (2020). "Chapter 11: History of Australian English". In Willoughby, Louisa (ed.). Australian English Reimagined: Structure, Features and Developments. Routledge. p. 181. ISBN 978-0-367-02939-5.
  10. ^ Cox, Felicity (2020). "Chapter 2: Phonetics and Phonology of Australian English". In Willoughby, Louisa (ed.). Australian English Reimagined: Structure, Features and Developments. Routledge. p. 15. ISBN 978-0-367-02939-5.

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