Christianity in Singapore

Christians in Singapore constitute 18.9% of the country's population.[1] In 2020, about 37.1% of the country's Christians identified as Catholic and 62.9% as 'Other Christians' (chiefly Protestants).[2]

Christianity was introduced to Singapore by Anglicans among the first British settlers to arrive shortly after the founding of modern Singapore by Stamford Raffles. The percentage of Christians in Singapore increased from 12.7% in 1990 to 14.6% in 2000.[3] Whilst the 2015 census showed the Christian population increased again, to 18.8%.[4] Christianity has flourished in post-colonial Singapore,[5] and a growing number of Singaporeans are converting to Christianity, Christian converts tend to come from the young, well-educated, higher-income brackets, and English-speaking Chinese generation.[6][7][8]

The majority of Christian churches are under the umbrella of the National Council of Churches of Singapore.[9] Most belong to Protestant traditions which consist of an array of denominations. Another major umbrella group is APCCS (Alliance of Pentecostal & Charismatic Churches Singapore)[10] is a network of local churches, Christian organisations and pastors from largely independent charismatic churches and the Assemblies of God denomination.

  1. ^ "Census of Population 2020: Religion" (PDF). Department of Statistics Singapore. 16 June 2021. Retrieved 25 June 2021.
  2. ^ Singapore Census of Population 2015: Statistical Release 1: Demographic Characteristics, Education, Language and Religion. Singapore: Department of Statistics, Ministry of Trade and Industry, Singapore. January 2011. Table 59 ("Resident Population Aged 15 Years and Over by Religion, Ethnic Group and Sex"). ISBN 978-981-08-7808-5.
  3. ^ Sng, Bobby E.K. (2003). In His Good Time: The Story of the Church in Singapore 1819–2002 (3rd ed.). Singapore: Bible Society of Singapore. p. 337. ISBN 981-220-286-2.
  4. ^ "Better-educated S'pore residents look to religion". 13 January 2011. Archived from the original on 16 January 2011. Retrieved 26 February 2011.
  5. ^ Goh, Daniel P. S. (21 April 2010). "State and Social Christianity in Post-colonial Singapore". Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia. Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia. 25 (1): 54–89. doi:10.1355/SJ25-1C. JSTOR 41308136. S2CID 144235936. Christianity has flourished in post-colonial Singapore, especially attracting conversions from among young, urbanized and English- educated.
  6. ^ S. Chin, Clive (2017). The Perception of Christianity as a Rational Religion in Singapore: A Missiological Analysis of Christian Conversione. Routledge. p. 166. ISBN 9781498298094. This socio-demographic characterizes Christian converts as mostly .. (2) well-educated, (3) belonging in higher-income brackets, (4) switching their religion between ten and twenty-nine years of age
  7. ^ "Religious Revival Among Chinese in Singapore" (PDF). SSA1201 Assignment. 14 May 2018. Converts to Christianity tend to come from the young, educated, English-speaking Chinese generation
  8. ^ Goh, Daniel P. S. (21 April 2010). "State and Social Christianity in Post-colonial Singapore". Sojourn: Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia. Journal of Social Issues in Southeast Asia. 25 (1): 54–89. doi:10.1355/SJ25-1C. JSTOR 41308136. S2CID 144235936. Christianity has flourished in post-colonial Singapore, especially attracting conversions from among young, urbanized and English- educated.
  9. ^ "National Council of Churches Singapore Website". National Council of Churches Singapore Website. Archived from the original on 25 April 2011.
  10. ^ "Alliance of Pentecostal & Charismatic Churches Singapore Website". Alliance of Pentecostal & Charismatic Churches Singapore. Retrieved 13 June 2022.

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